Happy New Year 2013!

سنة  جديدة  سعيدة

Xīnnián kuàilè .. heureuse nouvelle année ..

glückliches neues Jahr .. hau’oli makahiki hou

Happy New Year

2013

שנה טובה ומבורכת.. Boldog új évet.. bahagia tahun baru

felice anno nuovo .. Akemashite omedetōgozaimasu

saehae bog manh-i .. feliz año nuevo

heri. ya .mwaka .mpya

Obama Biden

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75 Responses to Happy New Year 2013!

  1. CR says:

    WH

    Tuesday, January 1, 2013

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama, Vice President Biden and Congress negotiate a budget deal

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
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    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM
    11:00 PM
    11:20 PM
    President Obama delivers a statement.

    11:45 PM
    President Obama departs the White House en route Andrews Air Force Base.

    12:00 AM
    President Obama departs Andrews Air Force Base en route Honolulu, Hawaii.

    • CR says:

      President Obama’s 2013 New Year Message

      “As we gather together this holiday season and look ahead to the new year I leave you with a simple message, a wish:

      In the face of violence, let’s see peace.

      In the face of injustice, let’s strive for dignity.

      In the face of oppression, let’s stand for liberty.

      And in the face of suspicion and mistrust, let’s build empathy and understanding.

      Let’s understand that we need to live together as nations and as peoples, as brothers and sisters, as children of a loving God.”

      12/19/12 President Barack Obama

  2. CR says:

    ProPresObama.org 2012 Annual Report

    This blog was viewed about 86,000 times in 2012.

    In 2012, there were 170 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 503 posts. There were 1625 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 282 MB. That’s about 4 pictures per day.

    The busiest day of the year was February 27th with 3,604 views. The most popular post that day was UAW National Community Action Program Legislative Conference.

  3. CR says:

    Why 2013 should be a good year for the U.S. economy

    December 26, 2012 at 11:23 am Posted by Neil Irwin – washingtonpost

    This is the first of three posts looking at how the economy will do in 2013. Today, we consider why the fundamentals of the U.S. economy point toward a good year. On Thursday and Friday we’ll look at the biggest risks to that positive outlook, first that the federal government will mess it all up, and second that international troubles could reemerge and dampen Americans’ prospects.

    There is good reason to think that 2013 will be the finally be the year that the U.S. economic recovery really feels like a recovery: The biggest forces that have been holding the economy back finally seem to be subsiding.

    There is a risk, of course, that new headwinds will gather to hold the economy back — but more on that on Thursday and Friday. Today, a look at why this should, by all rights, be quite a happy new year.

    The recession began five years ago and ended more than three years ago. Yet some 12 million Americans are still looking for work, and many millions more would confirm that it hasn’t felt like a recovery at all. That would include the people who have seen their incomes flatline or have been drowning in mortgage debt for years on end.

    The data support this impression, that the U.S. economy still hasn’t really recovered. Since the start of 2010, growth has averaged 2.2 percent, which would be just fine in normal times, but is lousy considering the starting point was a time of mass unemployment and general economic despair. The nation is poised to approach the fourth anniversary of economic recovery this summer with something approaching a $1 trillion gap between what it is capable of producing and what it is actually producing. Within that trillion dollars are the squelched dreams of millions of families who wanted a better economic life.

    It will take a few years of real growth — at least 3 percent, but 4 or 5 percent shouldn’t be too much to ask — to change that dynamic. And the stars are aligning for 2013 to be the beginning of a period of above-par growth.

    For more: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2012/12/26/why-2013-should-be-a-good-year-for-the-u-s-economy/

  4. CR says:

    US Fiscal Cliff Status

    * 12/27/12 President Obama arrived back early from his holiday recess to deal with the fiscal cliff crisis

    * 12/27/12 US Senate lawmakers return to Capitol Hill following their holiday recess for a special session on the fiscal cliff crisis

    * 12/30/12 US House of Representative lawmakers return to Capitol Hill following their holiday recess for a special session on the fiscal cliff crisis

    gop-house-leader-eric-cantor-fiscal-cliff-tweet

    • CR says:

      Fiscal cliff: Biden, McConnell make major progress

      12/31/12 6:00 AM EST Updated: 12/31/12 8:22 AM EST By JOHN BRESNAHAN, MANU RAJU and JAKE SHERMAN – POLITICO44

      Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Vice President Joe Biden engaged in furious overnight negotiations to avert the fiscal cliff and made major progress toward a year-end tax deal, giving sudden hope to high-stakes talks that had been on the brink of collapse, according to sources familiar with the discussion.

      McConnell and Biden, who served in the Senate together for 23 years, only started talking Sunday, after negotiations between Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) and McConnell sputtered.

      Sources close to the talks said a deal is now more likely to come together but cautioned that obstacles remain, including how Speaker John Boehner and House Republican leaders react to any tentative agreement.

      “The Leader and the VP continued their discussion late into the evening and will continue to work toward a solution. More info as it becomes available,” a McConnell spokesman said.

      It comes as Washington awakens on a chilly New Year’s eve to a daunting reality: If lawmakers and the White House are not able to broker a last-minute deal on the fiscal cliff, the country will actually go over it.

      For more: http://www.politico.com/story/2012/12/fiscal-cliff-hanger-as-deal-in-limbo-85599.html?hp=t1

      • CR says:

        Five facts about the Biden-McConnell deal

        December 31, 2012 at 5:35 pm Posted by Suzy Khimm – bloomberg

        The first thing that everyone points out about the proposed fiscal cliff deal between President Obama and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is that it lets the Bush tax cuts expire on income above $450,000. It also includes a one-year extension of unemployment insurance, ensuring that 2 million continue to receive benefits, while leaving out an extension of the payroll tax holiday. But there’s actually a lot more that’s in this possible agreement.

        1. The working poor would benefit significantly from an extension of tax breaks for low-income families

        2. The estate tax provision would benefit a very small number of people and an even smaller number of small businesses and family farms

        3. Businesses would continue to benefit from specially targeted tax breaks, including ones that support clean energy

        4. The Alternative Minimum Tax would be permanently fixed to avoid burdening middle-class families

        5. Capital gains and dividends would be taxed at 20 percent for families with income above $450,000

        For more: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2012/12/31/five-facts-about-the-biden-mcconnell-deal/

      • CR says:

        Democrats win key tax fights in emerging fiscal cliff deal

        12/31/12 4:07 PM EST By STEVEN SLOAN and KELSEY SNELL – POLITICO44

        The emerging fiscal cliff deal is enough to leave Republicans with a major New Year’s hangover.

        The package being negotiated by Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell and Vice President Joe Biden amounts to a defeat for the GOP on multiple fronts.

        It not only raises tax rates, but also extends stimulus-era tax policy, prolongs emergency unemployment benefits, maintains targeted tax breaks derided by the party as corporate handouts and revives limits on deductions for the wealthy that have been dormant for almost a decade — all policies that the GOP has fought. It’s expected to raise $600 billion over 10 years.

        Above all, the emerging deal would shatter 20 years of Republican orthodoxy on taxes, undercutting a core part of the party identity that had been built around giving no quarter to any tax increase — ever. An eventual vote on this tax package would mark the first time any Republicans have voted en masse on a tax increase since President George H.W. Bush famously recanted on his “read my lips” promise.

        Democrats are making concessions of their own, especially on the threshold at which tax rate hikes should kick in. After a campaign that centered on raising taxes for those making more than $250,000, the deal would instead raise the bar to $400,000 for individuals and $450,000 for married couples. Democrats also failed in their bid to subject more inheritances to a steeper estate tax and increase the debt ceiling as part of a fiscal cliff package.

        For more: http://www.politico.com/story/2012/12/democrats-win-tax-fights-in-emerging-fiscal-cliff-deal-85625.html?hp=t1_3

    • CR says:

      December 31, 2012

      Remarks by the President on Fiscal Cliff Negotiations

      South Court Auditorium
      Eisenhower Executive Office Building

      1:45 P.M. EST

      THE PRESIDENT: Hello, everybody! (Applause.) Thank you. Please, everybody have a seat. Well, good afternoon, everybody.

      AUDIENCE: Good afternoon!

      THE PRESIDENT: Welcome to the White House.

      AUDIENCE: Thank you!

      AUDIENCE MEMBER: Thank you for having us. (Laughter.)

      THE PRESIDENT: Now, I realize that the last thing you want to hear on New Year’s Eve is another speech from me. But I do need to talk about the progress that’s being made in Congress today.

      For the last few days, leaders in both parties have been working toward an agreement that will prevent a middle class tax hike from hitting 98 percent of all Americans, starting tomorrow. Preventing that tax hike has been my top priority, because the last thing folks like the folks up here on this stage can afford right now is to pay an extra $2,000 in taxes next year. Middle-class families can’t afford it. Businesses can’t afford it. Our economy can’t afford it.

      Now, today it appears that an agreement to prevent this New Year’s tax hike is within sight, but it’s not done. There are still issues left to resolve, but we’re hopeful that Congress can get it done. But it’s not done.

      And so part of the reason that I wanted to speak to all of you here today is to make sure that we emphasize to Congress and that members of both parties understand that all across America, this is a pressing concern on people’s minds.

      Now, the potential agreement that’s being talked about would not only make sure that taxes don’t go up on middle-class families, it also would extend tax credits for families with children. It would extend our tuition tax credit that’s helped millions of families pay for college. It would extend tax credits for clean energy companies that are creating jobs and reducing our dependence on foreign oil. It would extend unemployment insurance to 2 million Americans who are out there still actively looking for a job.

      I have to say that ever since I took office, throughout the campaign, and over the last couple of months, my preference would have been to solve all these problems in the context of a larger agreement, a bigger deal, a grand bargain — whatever you want to call it — that solves our deficit problems in a balanced and responsible way, that doesn’t just deal with the taxes but deals with the spending in a balanced way so that we can put all this behind us and just focusing on growing our economy.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/12/31/remarks-president-fiscal-cliff-negotiations

    • CR says:

      House won’t vote before midnight on ‘cliff’ deal

      12/31/12 Associated Press – 21 mins ago

      WASHINGTON (AP) — The House will miss the midnight Monday deadline lawmakers set for voting to avoid the “fiscal cliff.”

      House Republicans notified lawmakers that the chamber will vote Monday evening on other bills. They say that will be their only votes of the day.

      President Barack Obama and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell said Monday they are near a deal to avoid wide-ranging tax increases and spending cuts — the fiscal cliff — that take effect with the new year.

      Both men said they were still bargaining over whether — and how — to avoid $109 billion in cuts to defense and domestic programs that take effect on Wednesday.

      It remained unclear whether the Senate would vote Monday.
      Congress could pass later legislation retroactively blocking the tax hikes and spending cuts.

      • CR says:

        House Planning No Budget Vote Means Tax Increases Start

        Dec 31, 2012 1:48 PM PT By Roxana Tiron & Margaret Talev – bloomberg

        The U.S. House of Representatives doesn’t plan any votes on the federal budget tonight, meaning that Congress for now will fail to avert $600 billion in tax increases and spending cuts set to start at midnight.

        Taxpayers and investors won’t see immediate effects of the changes, which would accumulate over a matter of months. Congress could reverse them by acting retroactively early in 2013. There are signs they may do just that.

        Earlier today, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said lawmakers in Congress were “very, very close” to a deal to avert the budget changes, known as the fiscal cliff. The Kentucky Republican called on lawmakers to “pass the tax-relief portion” of a budget agreement being negotiated that would continue lower tax rates for all but the highest earners.

        The only House votes scheduled for today are on non-budget items, according to the chamber’s schedule. Republicans left open the option to return if needed. House Republicans planned a private conference meeting at 5 p.m. Washington time, and Senate Republicans were meeting at 4:30 p.m.

        President Barack Obama said before McConnell spoke that a deal to avert tax increases and spending cuts starting tomorrow is “within sight” though it hasn’t been completed.

        “It appears that an agreement to prevent this New Year’s tax hike is within sight, but it’s not done,” Obama told a group of what the White House described as middle-class taxpayers. He urged people to “keep the pressure on over the next 12 hours or so; let’s get this thing done.”

        For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-12-31/house-planning-no-budget-vote-means-tax-increases-start.html

      • CR says:

        Biden to Pitch Budget Deal to Democrats as Vote Possible

        Dec 31, 2012 4:04 PM PT By Kathleen Hunter & Richard Rubin – bloomberg

        Vice President Joe Biden will come to the Capitol to present a bipartisan budget deal to wavering Democrats, in advance of a possible vote tonight, with tax increases for almost every U.S. worker set to start tomorrow.

        Senate Republicans told reporters after a private meeting late today that many would support a deal to increase taxes on top earners, extend expanded unemployment benefits and prevent automatic spending cuts from taking effect for two months.

        The timing of the votes and a likely lack of action by the House of Representatives means that tax cuts first enacted in 2001 will expire at midnight.

        Taxpayers and investors won’t see immediate effects of the changes, which would accumulate over a matter of months. By acting early in 2013, Congress could reverse the $600 billion in tax and spending changes known as the fiscal cliff.

        Senators John McCain and Jon Kyl, both Arizona Republicans, said that a deal to avoid the automatic fiscal changes was in the final stages. Illinois Senator Dick Durbin, the chamber’s second-ranking Democrat, said Biden would brief fellow party members “when we get an agreement.”

        The House concluded business until noon tomorrow without taking action on the budget. Republicans left open the option to return if needed.

      • CR says:

        Senate clears fiscal cliff deal 89-8

        1/1/13 2:58 AM EST Updated: 1/1/13 9:08 AM EST
        By JAKE SHERMAN, CARRIE BUDOFF BROWN and KATE NOCERA – POLITICO

        Congress lost a mad, New Year’s Eve dash to beat the fiscal cliff deadline, cinching a deal with President Barack Obama to raise taxes on the wealthy and temporarily freeze deep spending cuts but failing to get it through both chambers before midnight.

        So over the cliff the country went — though perhaps for only a day or two and, assuming no snags, without incurring the double whammy of another recession and higher unemployment.

        The measure, which would raise tax rates for families making more than $450,000 and delay deep across-the-board spending cuts for two months, cleared the Senate by an overwhelming 89-8 vote shortly after 2 a.m. The Republican-controlled House could take up the pact in a rare New Year’s Day session, though the timing of that chamber’s vote was not clear.

        The $620 billion agreement was a major breakthrough in a partisan standoff that has dragged on for months, spooking Wall Street and threatening to hobble the economic recovery. It turned back the GOP’s two-decade-long refusal to raise tax rates, delivering a major win for the president.

        The bill also canceled pay raises for members of Congress and averted an expected hike in the price of milk by extending expiring dairy policy.

        But as big a deal as it was, it did little to address the nation’s long-term deficit problem — there’s nothing in it to pare back entitlement spending — or to defuse a potential crisis over raising the debt ceiling that could come as early as February.

        Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/01/senate-clears-fiscal-cliff-deal-89-8-85640.html?hp=t1

      • CR says:

        January 01, 2013

        Statement from the President on the Senate Deal to Extend Middle Class Tax Cuts

        Leaders from both parties in the Senate came together to reach an agreement that passed with overwhelming bipartisan support today that protects 98 percent of Americans and 97 percent of small business owners from a middle class tax hike. While neither Democrats nor Republicans got everything they wanted, this agreement is the right thing to do for our country and the House should pass it without delay.

        This agreement will also grow the economy and shrink our deficits in a balanced way – by investing in our middle class, and by asking the wealthy to pay a little more.

        What’s more, today’s agreement builds on previous efforts to reduce our deficits. Last year, I worked with Democrats and Republicans to cut spending by more than $1 trillion. Tonight’s agreement does even more by asking millionaires and billionaires to begin to pay their fair share for the first time in twenty years. As promised, that increase will be immediate, and it will be permanent.

        There’s more work to do to reduce our deficits, and I’m willing to do it. But tonight’s agreement ensures that, going forward, we will continue to reduce the deficit through a combination of new spending cuts and new revenues from the wealthiest Americans. And as we address our ongoing fiscal challenges, I will continue to fight every day on behalf of the middle class and all those fighting to get into the middle class to forge an economy that grows from the middle out, not from the top down.

        • CR says:

          President Obama on the “fiscal cliff” agreement

          Published on Jan 2, 2013

          President Obama on what’s in the “fiscal cliff” agreement and what it means for you. Watch it and share it with friends and family.

        • CR says:

          President Obama on the “fiscal cliff” agreement

          Published on Jan 2, 2013

          President Obama on what’s in the “fiscal cliff” agreement and what it means for you. Watch it and share it with friends and family.

      • CR says:

        Biden briefing House Democrats on fiscal cliff deal

        January 1, 2013 9:51 AM By Lynn Sweet – suntimes

        WASHINGTON–Vice President Joe Biden heads to Capitol Hill for the second time in less than 24 hours to broker deals for Congress to pass fiscal cliff legislation. Biden, the key White House negotiator with Senate Republicans, briefs House Democrats on the fiscal cliff deal at 12:15 p.m. ET.

        House Republican members hold their own huddle at 1 p.m.

        Other details on how the House will proceed are developing. There is no guarantee of a vote. The Senate passed their fiscal cliff bill a little after 2 a.m. on Tuesday after a rare New Year’s Even session.

        Click HERE to read the White House face sheet on the fiscal cliff legislation–which includes extending the farm bill for a year–which will prevent a spike in milk prices.

      • CR says:

        House Republican leaders seek escape from ‘fiscal cliff’ mess

        1/1/13 By Olivier Knox, Yahoo! News | The Ticket – 57 mins ago

        Updated 7:27 pm ET

        Republican House leaders are giving their fractious caucus a choice: Try to amend a fiscal cliff compromise passed in the Senate early Tuesday morning or go for a straight up-or-down vote on the original deal.

        Either way, it apppeared the fate of the measure would be known Tuesday night.

        A hard-fought bipartisan compromise hatched by Vice President Joe Biden and Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell to spare all but the richest Americans from painful income-tax hikes teetered on the edge of collapse on Tuesday as angry House Republicans balked at the package’s lack of spending cuts.

        The legislation sailed through the Senate shortly after 2 a.m. by a lopsided 89-8 margin. But it landed with a thud in the House, where Republican Majority Leader Eric Cantor surprised lawmakers by coming out flatly against the deal.

        Amending the Senate plan could jettison the entire deal.

        For more: http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/senate-house-faces-test-fiscal-cliff-deal-161832950–politics.html

        • CR says:

          House passes fiscal cliff deal, tamps down GOP revolt

          1/1/12 By Olivier Knox, Yahoo! News | The Ticket – 13 mins ago

          Updated 11:03 pm ET

          Despite a divided Republican majority, the House of Representatives late Tuesday easily approved emergency bipartisan legislation sparing all but a sliver of America’s richest from sharp income tax hikes — while setting up another “fiscal cliff” confrontation in a matter of weeks.

          Lawmakers voted 257-167 to send the compromise to President Barack Obama to sign into law. Eighty-five Republicans and 172 Democrats backed the bill, which had sailed through the Senate by a lopsided 89-8 margin shortly after 2 a.m. Opposition comprised 151 Republicans and 16 Democrats.

          Republican House Speaker John Boehner voted in favor of the deal, as did House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, his party’s failed vice presidential candidate. But Republican House Majority Leader Eric Cantor and Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy voted against it.

          For more: http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/ticket/senate-house-faces-test-fiscal-cliff-deal-161832950–politics.html

  5. CR says:

    Clinton suffered clot between brain and skull, doctors say

    12/31/12 Arshad Mohammed – Reuters – 23 mins ago

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton suffered a blood clot in a vein between her brain and skull behind her right ear but is expected to make a full recovery, her doctors said in a statement released by the State Department.

    Clinton did not suffer a stroke or neurological damage as a result of the clot, the doctors said, adding that “she is in good spirits, engaging with her doctors, her family and her staff.”

  6. CR says:

    Romney’s ’47 percent’ chosen as year’s best quote

    12/11/12 By By JOHN CHRISTOFFERSEN | Associated Press

    NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) — Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s comments about 47 percent of the population dependent on the government and “binders full of women” topped this year’s best quotes, according to a Yale University librarian.

    Fred Shapiro, associate librarian at Yale Law School, released his seventh annual list of the most notable quotations of the year.

    “Debate remarks and gaffes actually seemed to play an important role in the ups and downs of the election campaign and may even have affected the ultimate outcome of the election,” Shapiro said.

    Romney, who lost the November election to President Barack Obama, made the 47 percent comment at a private fundraiser in May that was secretly recorded and posted online in September by Mother Jones magazine.

    “There are 47 percent of the people who will vote for the president no matter what … who are dependent upon government, who believe that they are victims. … These are people who pay no income tax. … and so my job is not to worry about those people. I’ll never convince them that they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives,” Romney said.

    Romney spoke about reviewing “binders full of women” as governor when he sought to diversify his Massachusetts administration.

    “It contributed to an image of him as being somewhat out of touch and maybe particularly out of touch with issues related to women,” Shapiro said.

    For more: http://news.yahoo.com/romneys-47-percent-chosen-years-best-quote-162127619.html

  7. CR says:

    2013-joint-congressional-presidential-inaugural-committee

    Fifty Seventh Presidential Inauguration
    Tickets for the Swearing-In January 21, 2013

    Tickets for the Inaugural swearing-in ceremonies will be distributed in January 2013 by both Senators and Representatives elected (or reelected) this November.

    JCCIC Website: http://www.inaugural.senate.gov
    JCCIC Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/JCCIC

  8. Kat 4 Obama says:

    Happy and HOPEful New Year’s Eve, CR and all friends!

    >^..^<

  9. Happy New Year !!!

    Verzonden met mijn Windows Phone

  10. vitaminlover says:

    Happy New Year!

  11. CR says:

    Please join me in lighting a candle for our President, First Family and the Nation.

    http://www.gratefulness.org/candles/candles.cfm?l=eng&gi=PBO

  12. Kat 4 Obama says:

    Well, how do you like them apples. House will vote on fiscal cliff deal tonight with no amendments.

    http://tpmdc.talkingpointsmemo.com/2013/01/house-fiscal-cliff-vote.php

  13. Kat 4 Obama says:
    • CR says:

      January 01, 2013

      Statement from the President on the Senate Deal to Extend Middle Class Tax Cuts

      Leaders from both parties in the Senate came together to reach an agreement that passed with overwhelming bipartisan support today that protects 98 percent of Americans and 97 percent of small business owners from a middle class tax hike. While neither Democrats nor Republicans got everything they wanted, this agreement is the right thing to do for our country and the House should pass it without delay.

      This agreement will also grow the economy and shrink our deficits in a balanced way – by investing in our middle class, and by asking the wealthy to pay a little more.

      What’s more, today’s agreement builds on previous efforts to reduce our deficits. Last year, I worked with Democrats and Republicans to cut spending by more than $1 trillion. Tonight’s agreement does even more by asking millionaires and billionaires to begin to pay their fair share for the first time in twenty years. As promised, that increase will be immediate, and it will be permanent.

      There’s more work to do to reduce our deficits, and I’m willing to do it. But tonight’s agreement ensures that, going forward, we will continue to reduce the deficit through a combination of new spending cuts and new revenues from the wealthiest Americans. And as we address our ongoing fiscal challenges, I will continue to fight every day on behalf of the middle class and all those fighting to get into the middle class to forge an economy that grows from the middle out, not from the top down.

      • CR says:

        What The Howling Left Doesn’t Get: The Fiscal Cliff Deal Is A Huge Strategic Win For Progressives

        Tuesday, January 01, 2013 Posted by Deaniac83 – ThePeoplesView

        So, it’s a done deal. The fiscal cliff deal passed by the Senate in the wee hours of the new year morning has just cleared enough votes in the House. 90% of Democrats voted for it. But that’s not for lack of trying by the Left’s howler monkeys to kill this deal.

        This afternoon, I got an email from MoveOn.org, asking me to send an email to my Congresswoman, urging her to oppose the aforementioned deal. And so, of course, I sent her an email urging a vote in favor of the fiscal cliff compromise. What boggles the mind though – although, I suppose I should be used to the intransigence from the Left’s howling crowd demanding flying unicorns from the president – is what possibly could be keeping a group like MoveOn and its ideologue brotheren from supporting the deal.

        But to understand their grievances – or if you take my frame, hair-on-fire stagecraft – you need to understand, in short, what is in the deal. Summarizing from Wonkblog by Ezra Klein:

        * Income tax rates for incomes above $400,000 ($450,000 for joint filers) rise to a marginal rate of 39.6% permanently. All expiring (lower) tax rates for incomes below that amount are made permanent.
        * Estate tax increases to 40% for inheritances over $5 million, from the expiring 35%.
        * Stimulus tax breaks – the expanded Earned Income Tax Credit, the Child Tax Credit and the American Opportunity Tax Credit – are extended for another year.
        * The Alternative Minimum Tax is permanently fixed to stop it from affecting the middle class.
        * Extended unemployment benefits are extended for another year.
        * The stimulus business tax breaks – including R&D and wind energy credits – will also be extended for another year.
        * Medicare provider payments are prevented from decreasing drastically (both from the sequester deal, 2%, and the automatic yearly reductions that Congress prevents every year).
        * The rest of the sequester – i.e. the automatic defense and domestic cuts – is postponed for two months, financed 50% by defense and domestic cuts.
        * Personal exemptions are phased out for incomes above $250,000; itemized deductions will be reduced for people with incomes over $350,000.

        For more: http://www.thepeoplesview.net/2013/01/what-howling-left-doesnt-get-fiscal.html

        • CR says:

          House members to Boehner: ‘Shame on you’ for not holding Sandy vote

          1/01/13 11:55 PM ET By Pete Kasperowicz – TheHill

          Republicans and Democrats in the House blasted Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) late Tuesday night for deciding against holding any vote on a Hurricane Sandy supplemental aid bill before the end of the 112th Congress.

          Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) started the discussion on the House floor by saying he was just informed that the House would not be taking any other votes in the 112th Congress and so would not be taking up a Sandy bill until the next Congress.

          “This Congress is apparently leaving town without responding to that emergency,” Hoyer said. “I am deeply disappointed … and the people who have been damaged by Sandy, including Gov. [Chris] Christie, a Republican, and Gov. [Andrew] Cuomo, a Democrat, should be deeply disappointed, and yes, angry, that this Congress would adjourn without addressing the pain of our fellow citizens.”

          Hoyer was followed by several angry Republicans and Democrats, many of whom said Boehner should be ashamed for not taking up a Sandy bill.

          For more: http://thehill.com/blogs/floor-action/house/275119-house-members-to-boehner-shame-on-you-for-not-holding-sandy-vote

          • CR says:

            House GOP blocks Violence Against Women Act

            Wed Jan 2, 2013 2:13 PM EST By Steve Benen – maddowblog

            Congress had a lengthy to-do list as the end of the year approached, with a series of measures that needed action before 2013 began. Some of the items passed (a fiscal agreement, a temporary farm bill), while others didn’t (relief funding for victims of Hurricane Sandy).

            And then there’s the Violence Against Women Act, which was supposed to be one of the year’s easy ones. It wasn’t.

            Back in April, the Senate approved VAWA reauthorization fairly easily, with a 68 to 31 vote. The bill was co-written by a liberal Democrat (Vermont’s Pat Leahy) and a conservative Republican (Idaho’s Mike Crapo), and seemed on track to be reauthorized without much of a fuss, just as it was in 2000 and 2005.

            But House Republicans insisted the bill is too supportive of immigrants, the LGBT community, and Native Americans — and they’d rather let the law expire than approve a slightly expanded proposal. Vice President Biden, who helped write the original law, tried to persuade House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) to keep the law alive, but the efforts didn’t go anywhere.

            And so, for the first time since 1994, the Violence Against Women Act is no more. Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), the Democratic point person on VAWA, said in a statement:

            “The House Republican leadership’s failure to take up and pass the Senate’s bipartisan and inclusive VAWA bill is inexcusable. This is a bill that passed with 68 votes in the Senate and that extends the bill’s protections to 30 million more women. But this seems to be how House Republican leadership operates. No matter how broad the bipartisan support, no matter who gets hurt in the process, the politics of the right wing of their party always comes first.”

            For more: http://maddowblog.msnbc.com/_news/2013/01/02/16305284-house-gop-blocks-violence-against-women-act?lite

          • CR says:

            Good Riddance to Rottenest Congress in History

            Jan 2, 2013 3:17 PM PT By Ezra Klein – bloomberg

            On January 3rd, the 112th Congress of the United States of America finally ends. Thank God.

            To properly evaluate the 112th, consider the record of its predecessor, the 111th Congress, which ran from January 2009 to January 2011. The fighting 111th passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (better known as the “stimulus”), the Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare”), and the Dodd-Frank financial reforms. It passed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act and expanded both the Serve America Act for community service and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. It created significant new anti-tobacco regulations, ratified the New Start nuclear arms reduction treaty, ended “don’t ask, don’t tell” in the armed forces and agreed to the 2010 tax deal, which extended the Bush tax cuts in return for the passage of middle- class stimulus.

            The laws passed by the 111th Congress were controversial, particularly among Republicans. They were also big, bold initiatives that, if not always fully equal to the size of our problems, surely perched on the outer edge of Congress’s capacity to deliver solutions. Love it or hate it, the 111th Congress governed. No Congress in recent history has a record of productivity anywhere near it.

            Terrible Policy
            What’s the record of the 112th Congress? Well, it almost shut down the government and almost breached the debt ceiling. It almost went over the fiscal cliff (which it had designed in the first place). It cut a trillion dollars of discretionary spending in the Budget Control Act and scheduled another trillion in spending cuts through an automatic sequester, which everyone agrees is terrible policy. It achieved nothing of note on housing, energy, stimulus, immigration, guns, tax reform, infrastructure, climate change or, really, anything. It’s hard to identify a single significant problem that existed prior to the 112th Congress that was in any way improved by its two years of rule.

            The 112th, which was gaveled into being on Jan. 3, 2011, by newly elected House Speaker John Boehner, wasn’t just unproductive in comparison with the 111th. It was unproductive compared with any Congress since 1948, when scholars began keeping tabs on congressional productivity.

            When it ends, the 112th Congress will have passed about 220 public laws — by far the least of any Congress on record. Prior to the 112th, the least productive Congress was the 104th, from January 1995 to January 1997. Not coincidentally, that Congress also featured a new Republican House majority determined to ruin a Democratic president in advance of the next campaign. The 104th, however, passed 333 public laws — almost 50 percent more than the 112th. The 112th stands alone in its achievement of epic failure.

            For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-01-02/good-riddance-to-rottenest-congress-in-history.html

      • CR says:

        President Obama on the “fiscal cliff” agreement

        Published on Jan 2, 2013

        President Obama on what’s in the “fiscal cliff” agreement and what it means for you. Watch it and share it with friends and family.

      • CR says:

        January 03, 2013

        Statement by the Press Secretary on H.R. 8

        On Wednesday, January 2, 2013, the President signed into law:

        H.R. 8, the “American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012,” which makes permanent the temporary rates on taxable income at or below $400,000 for individual filers and $450,000 for married individuals filing jointly; permanently indexes the Alternative Minimum Tax exemption amount to the Consumer Price Index; extends emergency unemployment compensation benefits and Federal funding for extended benefits for unemployed workers for one year; continues current law Medicare payment rates for physicians’ services furnished through December 31, 2013; extends farm bill policies and programs through September 30, 2013; and provides a postponement of the Budget Control Act’s sequester for two months.

        • CR says:

          Seven Things You Need to Know About the Tax Deal

          January 3, 2013

          1) As the President promised, income tax rates for middle-class families will stay low permanently. That’s good news for 98 percent of Americans and 97 percent of small businesses.

          2) As the President promised, for the first time in 20 years, a bipartisan agreement will increase tax rates on the wealthy. That rate increase will be immediate and permanent. Individuals making more than $250,000 will be asked to pay a little more to help reduce the deficit through a combination of increased tax rates and reduced tax benefits.

          3) This agreement cuts the deficit. It builds on the $1 trillion of spending cuts the President signed into law in 2011 through the Budget Control Act. This new agreement cuts the deficit by $737 billion by asking the wealthiest to begin to pay their fair share. Moving forward, the President is committed to reducing the deficit even more, splitting savings in a balanced way between spending cuts and even more revenue from the wealthiest

          4) As part of this deal, a group of tax cuts that help middle-class families keep more money in their pockets and afford to pay for higher education was also extended. The Child Tax Credit, Earned Income Tax Credit, and the new American Opportunity Tax Credit will stay in effect for at least the next five years.

          5) We’ll continue making investments that create jobs in domestic clean energy and innovation because the agreement extends the Production Tax Credit and the Research & Experimentation Tax Credit.

          6) Lawmakers agreed to extend emergency unemployment insurance for 2 million people looking for work.

          7) This agreement doesn’t cut Social Security benefits, Medicare, or Medicaid. That’s because the President stood strong against reducing our deficit on the backs of seniors, students, the poor, and working families.

          ————-

          White House White Board – American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012

          Published on Jan 3, 2013

          Deputy Director of the National Economic Council, Brian Deese, explains the bi-partisan deal that was recently completed in Washington and outlines what the deal means for the economy and how it met President Obama’s key economic priorities.

      • CR says:

        President Obama on the “fiscal cliff” agreement

        Published on Jan 2, 2013

        President Obama on what’s in the “fiscal cliff” agreement and what it means for you. Watch it and share it with friends and family.

  14. CR says:

    aloha_oe

    Obama heads to Hawaii

    1/1/13 11:40 PM EST By DONOVAN SLACK – POLITICO44

    Shortly after the House passed a deal averting the fiscal cliff, the White House announced President Obama will be heading to Hawaii to finish out his vacation.

    His wife and daughters have been there since before Christmas, but he left them to return to Washington to resolve the cliff standoff with Congress.

    The White House did not say how long the president would stay, but earlier security arrangements indicated the island of Oahu was prepared for him to stay until Jan. 6.

  15. CR says:

    WH

    Wednesday, January 2, 2013

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    President Obama arrives in Honolulu, Hawaii (50th State)

    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

    President Obama signs the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 via autopen
    Kailua, Hawaii

  16. CR says:

    Motor Vehicle Sales

    Released On 1/2/2013 For Dec, 2012

    Prior Consensus Consensus Range
    Domestic Vehicle Sales 12.0 M 11.7 M 11.6 M to 11.8 M
    Total Vehicle Sales 15.5 M 15.1 M 14.8 M to 16.3 M

    Market Consensus before announcement
    Sales of total light motor vehicles in November surged a monthly 8.7 percent to a 15.5 million annual rate. Replacement demand tied to Hurricane Sandy boosted sales as did incentives during the month. Sales were led by imports, up 11.2 percent, versus domestics, up 8.0 percent. Sales of imported trucks were up a sharp 15.9 percent, likely reflecting demand due to Sandy.

    Source: http://bloomberg.econoday.com/byshoweventfull.asp?fid=455391&cust=bloomberg-us&year=2013&lid=0&prev=/byweek.asp#top

  17. CR says:

    House members to Boehner: ‘Shame on you’ for not holding Sandy vote

    1/01/13 11:55 PM ET By Pete Kasperowicz – TheHill

    Republicans and Democrats in the House blasted Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) late Tuesday night for deciding against holding any vote on a Hurricane Sandy supplemental aid bill before the end of the 112th Congress.

    Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) started the discussion on the House floor by saying he was just informed that the House would not be taking any other votes in the 112th Congress and so would not be taking up a Sandy bill until the next Congress.

    “This Congress is apparently leaving town without responding to that emergency,” Hoyer said. “I am deeply disappointed … and the people who have been damaged by Sandy, including Gov. [Chris] Christie, a Republican, and Gov. [Andrew] Cuomo, a Democrat, should be deeply disappointed, and yes, angry, that this Congress would adjourn without addressing the pain of our fellow citizens.”

    Hoyer was followed by several angry Republicans and Democrats, many of whom said Boehner should be ashamed for not taking up a Sandy bill.

    For more: http://thehill.com/blogs/floor-action/house/275119-house-members-to-boehner-shame-on-you-for-not-holding-sandy-vote

    • CR says:

      January 02, 2013

      Statement by the President on the Status of the Administration’s Supplemental Request to Congress for Response, Recovery and Mitigation Related to Hurricane Sandy

      It has only been two months since Hurricane Sandy devastated communities across New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut as well as other eastern states. Our citizens are still trying to put their lives back together. Our states are still trying to rebuild vital infrastructure. And so, last month, working closely with the Governors of the affected states, I sent Congress an urgent request to support their efforts to rebuild and recover. The Senate passed this request with bipartisan support. But the House of Representatives has refused to act, even as there are families and communities who still need our help to rebuild in the months and years ahead, and who also still need immediate support with the bulk of winter still in front of us.

      When tragedy strikes, Americans come together to support those in need. I urge Republicans in the House of Representatives to do the same, bring this important request to a vote today, and pass it without delay for our fellow Americans.

    • CR says:

      House GOP blocks Violence Against Women Act

      Wed Jan 2, 2013 2:13 PM EST By Steve Benen – maddowblog

      Congress had a lengthy to-do list as the end of the year approached, with a series of measures that needed action before 2013 began. Some of the items passed (a fiscal agreement, a temporary farm bill), while others didn’t (relief funding for victims of Hurricane Sandy).

      And then there’s the Violence Against Women Act, which was supposed to be one of the year’s easy ones. It wasn’t.

      Back in April, the Senate approved VAWA reauthorization fairly easily, with a 68 to 31 vote. The bill was co-written by a liberal Democrat (Vermont’s Pat Leahy) and a conservative Republican (Idaho’s Mike Crapo), and seemed on track to be reauthorized without much of a fuss, just as it was in 2000 and 2005.

      But House Republicans insisted the bill is too supportive of immigrants, the LGBT community, and Native Americans — and they’d rather let the law expire than approve a slightly expanded proposal. Vice President Biden, who helped write the original law, tried to persuade House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) to keep the law alive, but the efforts didn’t go anywhere.

      And so, for the first time since 1994, the Violence Against Women Act is no more. Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), the Democratic point person on VAWA, said in a statement:

      “The House Republican leadership’s failure to take up and pass the Senate’s bipartisan and inclusive VAWA bill is inexcusable. This is a bill that passed with 68 votes in the Senate and that extends the bill’s protections to 30 million more women. But this seems to be how House Republican leadership operates. No matter how broad the bipartisan support, no matter who gets hurt in the process, the politics of the right wing of their party always comes first.”

      For more: http://maddowblog.msnbc.com/_news/2013/01/02/16305284-house-gop-blocks-violence-against-women-act?lite

    • CR says:

      Good Riddance to Rottenest Congress in History

      Jan 2, 2013 3:17 PM PT By Ezra Klein – bloomberg

      On January 3rd, the 112th Congress of the United States of America finally ends. Thank God.

      To properly evaluate the 112th, consider the record of its predecessor, the 111th Congress, which ran from January 2009 to January 2011. The fighting 111th passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (better known as the “stimulus”), the Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare”), and the Dodd-Frank financial reforms. It passed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act and expanded both the Serve America Act for community service and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. It created significant new anti-tobacco regulations, ratified the New Start nuclear arms reduction treaty, ended “don’t ask, don’t tell” in the armed forces and agreed to the 2010 tax deal, which extended the Bush tax cuts in return for the passage of middle- class stimulus.

      The laws passed by the 111th Congress were controversial, particularly among Republicans. They were also big, bold initiatives that, if not always fully equal to the size of our problems, surely perched on the outer edge of Congress’s capacity to deliver solutions. Love it or hate it, the 111th Congress governed. No Congress in recent history has a record of productivity anywhere near it.

      Terrible Policy
      What’s the record of the 112th Congress? Well, it almost shut down the government and almost breached the debt ceiling. It almost went over the fiscal cliff (which it had designed in the first place). It cut a trillion dollars of discretionary spending in the Budget Control Act and scheduled another trillion in spending cuts through an automatic sequester, which everyone agrees is terrible policy. It achieved nothing of note on housing, energy, stimulus, immigration, guns, tax reform, infrastructure, climate change or, really, anything. It’s hard to identify a single significant problem that existed prior to the 112th Congress that was in any way improved by its two years of rule.

      The 112th, which was gaveled into being on Jan. 3, 2011, by newly elected House Speaker John Boehner, wasn’t just unproductive in comparison with the 111th. It was unproductive compared with any Congress since 1948, when scholars began keeping tabs on congressional productivity.

      When it ends, the 112th Congress will have passed about 220 public laws — by far the least of any Congress on record. Prior to the 112th, the least productive Congress was the 104th, from January 1995 to January 1997. Not coincidentally, that Congress also featured a new Republican House majority determined to ruin a Democratic president in advance of the next campaign. The 104th, however, passed 333 public laws — almost 50 percent more than the 112th. The 112th stands alone in its achievement of epic failure.

      For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-01-02/good-riddance-to-rottenest-congress-in-history.html

  18. CR says:

    ICSC-Goldman Store Sales

    Released On 1/2/2013 7:45:00 AM For wk12/29, 2012

    Prior Actual
    Store Sales – W/W change 0.7 % 0.6 %
    Store Sales – Y/Y 3.2 % 2.7 %

    Highlights
    Post-Christmas bargain hunting helped drive same-store sales up a strong 0.6 percent in the December 29 week, according to ICSC-Goldman’s same-store sales index which shows a respectable plus 2.7 percent year-on-year rate. Also helping sales was the week’s cold weather which drove up sales of seasonal goods. Redbook’s tally will be posted later this morning at 8:55 a.m. ET.

    Source: http://bloomberg.econoday.com/byshoweventfull.asp?fid=455494&cust=bloomberg-us&year=2013&lid=0&prev=/byweek.asp#top

  19. CR says:

    PMI Manufacturing Index

    Released On 1/2/2013 8:58:00 AM For Dec, 2012

    Prior Consensus Consensus Range Actual
    Level 52.8 54.2 52.8 to 54.5 54.0

    Highlights
    The final December reading for Markit Economics’ PMI (Purchasing Managers’ Manufacturing Index) manufacturing report is a very solid 54.0, down two tenths from the flash reading but up a solid 1.2 points from November’s 52.8. Any reading over 50 indicates monthly growth in general business activity with December’s higher reading indicating a greater rate of growth than November. In fact, 54.0 is the strongest final reading since May.

    There’s very little change from the flash reading at mid-month with new orders, at 54.7 for a 1.1 point gain from November, a stand-out positive for the month. Backlog orders show slight growth, which of course is a positive, while the new export orders index, at 52.6 for a 2.3 point gain, is a special positive that hints at recovery in foreign markets. Employment is also a positive, at 54.5 for a nearly two point gain that points to building confidence among manufacturers.

    The approach of the fiscal cliff certainly didn’t hold down Markit’s sample, which is a good general indication for December’s other economic data. The monthly manufacturing report from the ISM, whose sample has been showing less strength than Markit’s sample, will be posted later this morning at 10:00 a.m. ET.

    Source: http://bloomberg.econoday.com/byshoweventfull.asp?fid=456566&cust=bloomberg-us&year=2013&lid=0&prev=/byweek.asp#top

  20. CR says:

    Construction Spending

    Released On 1/2/2013 10:00:00 AM For Nov, 2012

    Prior Prior Revised Consensus Consensus Range Actual
    Construction Spending – M/M change 1.4 % 0.7 % 0.6 % 0.0 % to 1.0 % -0.3 %

    Market Consensus before announcement
    Construction spending jumped 1.4 percent in October, following a gain of 0.5 percent the month before. The rise in October was led by private residential spending which advanced 3.0 percent after rising 1.1 percent the prior month. For the latest month, new 1-family outlays jumped 3.6 percent, new multi-family construction jumped 6.2 percent, and residential excluding new homes (largely improvements) gained 1.8 percent. Private nonresidential spending rose 0.3 percent after increasing 0.5 percent in September. Public outlays rebounded 0.8 percent, following a 0.1 percent dip the prior month.

    Source: http://bloomberg.econoday.com/byshoweventfull.asp?fid=456268&cust=bloomberg-us&year=2013&lid=0&prev=/byweek.asp#top

  21. CR says:

    Manufacturing sector expands in December: ISM

    1/2/13 Steven C. Johnson – Reuters – 3 mins 52 secs ago

    NEW YORK (Reuters) – Manufacturing expanded slightly in December, bouncing back from an unexpected contraction the prior month, according to an industry report released on Wednesday.

    The Institute for Supply Management (ISM) said its index of national factory activity rose to 50.7 from 49.5 in November. The reading narrowly beat 50.3, the median expectation of 55 economists polled by Reuters.

    A reading above 50 indicates expansion in the sector.

    While the index recovered from the 40-month low hit in November, it was well off the 54.1 reading seen in January 2012, suggesting manufacturing was still struggling to regain the momentum it had at the start of last year.

    The employment index rose to 52.7 in December from 48.4, while the forward-looking new orders component was steady at 50.3. Prices paid jumped to 55.5 from 52.5, beating expectations of 51.5.

  22. CR says:

    Top 10 Manufacturing Predictions for 2013

    IDC Manufacturing Insights Releases Top 10 Predictions for 2013
    New generation of manufacturing leadership will favor longer term growth initiatives based on advanced technology

    Dec 6, 2012 4:00 PM EST IDC Manufacturing Insights –

    FRAMINGHAM, Mass.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–
    IDC Manufacturing Insights today hosted a Webinar, IDC Manufacturing Insights Predictions 2013: Manufacturing, highlighting the top 10 predictions for the year ahead. Featuring analysts Robert Parker, Joe Barkai, Sheila Brennan, Simon Ellis, Kimberly Knickle, and Pierfrancesco Manenti, the session provided organizations with insight and perspective on long-term industry trends along with new themes that may be on the horizon. The Predictions Webinar series is designed to help company leaders capitalize on emerging market opportunities and plan for future growth. An audio replay of today’s Webinar will be available within 48 hours. To access the reply, please visit http://bit.ly/MI_Predictions2013_Manufacturing.

    The Top 10 Predictions for 2013 are:

    Prediction 1 – Business Productivity – The Next Wave Begins.
    Prediction 2 – 4 Pillars Support the House of Productivity.
    Prediction 3 – Resiliency Becomes a Priority for Manufacturers Looking to Master “Massive Multidimensionality.”
    Prediction 4 – Manufacturing IT Organizations will have to Support a More Productive Operational Ecosystem.
    Prediction 5 – Companies Recalibrate the Product Lifecycle Process.
    Prediction 6 – IT Delivers a “Digital Thread” for the Product Management Process.
    Prediction 7 – Service Excellence Becomes a Strategic Priority.
    Prediction 8 – Technology Advancements Accelerate Service Excellence Initiatives.
    Prediction 9 – People will be at the Center of the Factory of the Future.
    Prediction 10 – Advanced Technologies will Emerge in Support of Operational Excellence Strategies.

    “Manufacturing companies are sitting on a record stockpile of cash and, provided near-term uncertainties are resolved, are looking at robust global markets beyond 2013,” said Robert Parker, group vice president, IDC Manufacturing Insights. “Also, we are seeing a generational change at the executive levels across all segments. This new generation of manufacturing leadership will eschew stock buybacks and dividend increases in favor of longer term growth initiatives, many of which will have advanced technology at the core.”

    For more: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/idc-manufacturing-insights-releases-top-210000073.html;_ylt=A2KJjan7aMJQFScAzhTQtDMD

  23. CR says:

    Please join me in lighting a candle for our President, First Family and our Nation.

    http://www.gratefulness.org/candles/candles.cfm?l=eng&gi=PBO

  24. CR says:

    President Obama on the “fiscal cliff” agreement

    Published on Jan 2, 2013

    President Obama on what’s in the “fiscal cliff” agreement and what it means for you. Watch it and share it with friends and family.

  25. CR says:

    Obama hits the golf course

    1/2/13 3:24 PM EST By DONOVAN SLACK – POLITICO44

    After a contentious battle with Congress and midnight flight to Hawaii, President Obama got right back into vacation mode.

    After landing in Honolulu just before 5 a.m., he headed to the home in Kailua where his wife and daughters had been vacationing without him.

    Then he got an early start with a workout at the gym, and later hit the links at the Marine Corps Base in Kaneohe.

  26. Kat 4 Obama says:

    Happy and HOPEful day after the Incredible Fiscal Cliff Deal of a Lifetime, CR and all friends!

    >^..^<

  27. CR says:

    January 03, 2013

    Statement by the Press Secretary on H.R. 8

    On Wednesday, January 2, 2013, the President signed into law:

    H.R. 8, the “American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012,” which makes permanent the temporary rates on taxable income at or below $400,000 for individual filers and $450,000 for married individuals filing jointly; permanently indexes the Alternative Minimum Tax exemption amount to the Consumer Price Index; extends emergency unemployment compensation benefits and Federal funding for extended benefits for unemployed workers for one year; continues current law Medicare payment rates for physicians’ services furnished through December 31, 2013; extends farm bill policies and programs through September 30, 2013; and provides a postponement of the Budget Control Act’s sequester for two months.

    • CR says:

      Seven Things You Need to Know About the Tax Deal

      January 3, 2013

      1) As the President promised, income tax rates for middle-class families will stay low permanently. That’s good news for 98 percent of Americans and 97 percent of small businesses.

      2) As the President promised, for the first time in 20 years, a bipartisan agreement will increase tax rates on the wealthy. That rate increase will be immediate and permanent. Individuals making more than $250,000 will be asked to pay a little more to help reduce the deficit through a combination of increased tax rates and reduced tax benefits.

      3) This agreement cuts the deficit. It builds on the $1 trillion of spending cuts the President signed into law in 2011 through the Budget Control Act. This new agreement cuts the deficit by $737 billion by asking the wealthiest to begin to pay their fair share. Moving forward, the President is committed to reducing the deficit even more, splitting savings in a balanced way between spending cuts and even more revenue from the wealthiest

      4) As part of this deal, a group of tax cuts that help middle-class families keep more money in their pockets and afford to pay for higher education was also extended. The Child Tax Credit, Earned Income Tax Credit, and the new American Opportunity Tax Credit will stay in effect for at least the next five years.

      5) We’ll continue making investments that create jobs in domestic clean energy and innovation because the agreement extends the Production Tax Credit and the Research & Experimentation Tax Credit.

      6) Lawmakers agreed to extend emergency unemployment insurance for 2 million people looking for work.

      7) This agreement doesn’t cut Social Security benefits, Medicare, or Medicaid. That’s because the President stood strong against reducing our deficit on the backs of seniors, students, the poor, and working families.

      ————-

      White House White Board – American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012

      Published on Jan 3, 2013

      Deputy Director of the National Economic Council, Brian Deese, explains the bi-partisan deal that was recently completed in Washington and outlines what the deal means for the economy and how it met President Obama’s key economic priorities.

  28. CR says:

    Good Riddance to Rottenest Congress in History

    Jan 2, 2013 3:17 PM PT By Ezra Klein – bloomberg

    On January 3rd, the 112th Congress of the United States of America finally ends. Thank God.

    To properly evaluate the 112th, consider the record of its predecessor, the 111th Congress, which ran from January 2009 to January 2011. The fighting 111th passed the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (better known as the “stimulus”), the Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare”), and the Dodd-Frank financial reforms. It passed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act and expanded both the Serve America Act for community service and the Children’s Health Insurance Program. It created significant new anti-tobacco regulations, ratified the New Start nuclear arms reduction treaty, ended “don’t ask, don’t tell” in the armed forces and agreed to the 2010 tax deal, which extended the Bush tax cuts in return for the passage of middle- class stimulus.

    The laws passed by the 111th Congress were controversial, particularly among Republicans. They were also big, bold initiatives that, if not always fully equal to the size of our problems, surely perched on the outer edge of Congress’s capacity to deliver solutions. Love it or hate it, the 111th Congress governed. No Congress in recent history has a record of productivity anywhere near it.

    Terrible Policy
    What’s the record of the 112th Congress? Well, it almost shut down the government and almost breached the debt ceiling. It almost went over the fiscal cliff (which it had designed in the first place). It cut a trillion dollars of discretionary spending in the Budget Control Act and scheduled another trillion in spending cuts through an automatic sequester, which everyone agrees is terrible policy. It achieved nothing of note on housing, energy, stimulus, immigration, guns, tax reform, infrastructure, climate change or, really, anything. It’s hard to identify a single significant problem that existed prior to the 112th Congress that was in any way improved by its two years of rule.

    The 112th, which was gaveled into being on Jan. 3, 2011, by newly elected House Speaker John Boehner, wasn’t just unproductive in comparison with the 111th. It was unproductive compared with any Congress since 1948, when scholars began keeping tabs on congressional productivity.

    When it ends, the 112th Congress will have passed about 220 public laws — by far the least of any Congress on record. Prior to the 112th, the least productive Congress was the 104th, from January 1995 to January 1997. Not coincidentally, that Congress also featured a new Republican House majority determined to ruin a Democratic president in advance of the next campaign. The 104th, however, passed 333 public laws — almost 50 percent more than the 112th. The 112th stands alone in its achievement of epic failure.

    For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-01-02/good-riddance-to-rottenest-congress-in-history.html

  29. CR says:

    ********************
    THIS POST IS NOW CLOSED NBLB

    Come on over to my newest post titled: ” 113th US Congress – How Laws Are Made”

    ********************

    To get to the newest post click on “HOME” at the top of the thread

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