Economics of Immigration Reform

Economics of Immigration Reform

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CBO Report: Immigration Reform Will Shrink the Deficit and Grow the Economy

June 18, 2013 8:30 PM EDT Sylvia Mathews Burwell, Alan Krueger, Gene Sperling

Today, the independent Congressional Budget Office released its score of the Senate’sbipartisan immigration bill, providing even more evidence that commonsense immigration reform is good for the budget and good for economic growth.

CBO estimates that fixing our broken immigration system will reduce federal deficits by about $200 billion over the next 10 years, and about $700 billion in the second decade. The CBO analysis made clear that the additional taxes paid by new and legalizing immigrants would not only offset any new spending, but would be substantial enough to reduce the deficit over the 20-year window. A significant portion of the new taxes would be paid by previously undocumented immigrants. While many of these workers already pay federal taxes, millions more will pay payroll taxes once they are able to obtain legal status and work above board.

CBO also found that commonsense immigration reform will increase real GDP by 3.3% in 2023, and 5.4% in 2033, a real increase of roughly $700 billion in 2023 and $1.4 trillion in 2033, due to higher labor force participation, increased capital investment, and increased productivity resulting from “technological advancements, such as new innovations and improvements in the production process.”

CBO’s score follows other recent independent analyses which underscore that passing commonsense immigration reform is also one of the best, and often overlooked, ways to strengthen the solvency of the Social Security trust fund.

For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/06/18/cbo-report-immigration-reform-will-shrink-deficit-and-grow-economy

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Commonsense Immigration Reform Will Strengthen Social Security

July 01, 2013  Sylvia Mathews Burwell, Alan Krueger, Cecilia Muñoz and Gene Sperling

On Friday, we got even more proof of the high costs of inaction on bipartisan commonsense immigration reform.

In a letter to Senator Rubio released on Friday, the independent Social Security Office of the Chief Actuary provided a long-term analysis of the bipartisan Senate-passed Immigration Reform bill, demonstrating that commonsense immigration reform will strengthen Social Security over the long-term. Reform will ensure full Social Security solvency through 2035 and reduce Social Security unfunded liabilities by nearly half a trillion dollars through 2087.

The Social Security long-term report follows the recent analysis from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office that showed commonsense immigration reform is good for the budget and good for economic growth. The new Social Security report confirms that the bipartisan Senate-passed Immigration Reform Bill is also good for Social Security. The Senate-passed bill will strengthen the solvency of the Social Security Trust Fund in the short run and the long run by reforming the legal immigration system and by allowing undocumented workers to work above-board and thus ensuring that they pay payroll taxes.

The Actuary’s long-term report confirms that the net effect of the bipartisan Senate-passed Immigration Reform Bill is to strengthen Social Security solvency. The Actuary found that the Senate-passed immigration reform bill will keep the Social Security Trust Fund fully solvent through 2035. (Without reform, the Social Security Actuary and Trustees expect the Social Security Trust Fund to be depleted by 2033.) The Chief Actuary notes that, “Even after depletion of the trust fund reserves, however, the actuarial status of the program is improved because continuing income would be sufficient to pay a higher percentage of scheduled benefits than under current law.” In fact, the Senate-passed bill will reduce the 75-year Social Security shortfall by nearly half a trillion dollars, in present value terms.

For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/07/01/commonsense-immigration-reform-will-strengthen-social-security

June 11, 2013

Remarks by the President on Immigration Reform

East Room

10:38 A.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT: Good morning, everybody. Welcome to the White House. It is a pleasure to have so many distinguished Americans today from so many different walks of life. We’ve got Democrats and Republicans; we’ve got labor and business leaders up on stage; we have law enforcement and clergy — Americans who don’t see eye-to-eye on every issue, in fact, in some cases, don’t see eye-to-eye on just about any issue — (laughter) — but who are today standing united in support of the legislation that is front and center in Congress this week — a bipartisan bill to fix our broken immigration system.

And I have to say — please give Tolu another round of applause. (Applause.) It takes a lot of courage to do what Tolu did — to step out of the shadows, to share her story, and to hope that, despite the risks, she could make a difference. But Tolu I think is representative of so many DREAMers out there who have worked so hard — and I’ve had a chance to meet so many of them who’ve been willing to give a face to the undocumented and have inspired a movement across America. And with each step, they’ve reminded us — time and again — what this debate is all about. This is not an abstract debate. This is about incredible young people who understand themselves to be Americans, who have done everything right but have still been hampered in achieving their American Dream.

And they remind us that we’re a nation of immigrants. Throughout our history, the promise we found in those who come from every corner of the globe has always been one of our greatest strengths. It’s kept our workforce vibrant and dynamic. It’s kept our businesses on the cutting edge. It’s helped build the greatest economic engine that the world has ever known.

When I speak to other world leaders, one of the biggest advantages we have economically is our demographics. We’re constantly replenishing ourselves with talent from across the globe. No other country can match that history. And what was true years ago is still true today — who’s beeping over there? (Laughter.) You’re feeling kind of self-conscious, aren’t you? (Laughter.) It’s okay.

In recent years, one in four of America’s new small business owners were immigrants. One in four high-tech startups in America were founded by immigrants. Forty percent of Fortune 500 companies were started by a first- or second-generation American. Think about that — almost half of the Fortune 500 companies when they were started were started by first- or second-generation immigrants. So immigration isn’t just part of our national character. It is a driving force in our economy that creates jobs and prosperity for all of our citizens.

Now, here’s the thing. Over the past two decades, our immigration system hasn’t kept pace with changing times and hasn’t matched up with our most cherished values.

Right now, our immigration system invites the best and the brightest from all over the world to come and study at our top universities, and then once they finish — once they’ve gotten the training they need to build a new invention or create a new business — our system too often tells them to go back home so that other countries can reap the benefits, the new jobs, the new businesses, the new industries. That’s not smart. But that’s the broken system we have today.

Right now, our immigration system keeps families apart for years at a time. Even for folks who, technically, under the legal immigration system, should be eligible to become citizens but it is so long and so cumbersome, so byzantine, that families end up being separated for years. Because of a backlog in visas, people who come here legally — who are ready to give it their all to earn their place in America — end up waiting for years to join their loved ones here in the United States. It’s not right. But that’s the broken system we have today.

Right now, our immigration system has no credible way of dealing with the 11 million men and women who are in this country illegally. And, yes, they broke the rules; they didn’t wait their turn. They shouldn’t be let off easy. They shouldn’t be allowed to game the system. But at the same time, the vast majority of these individuals aren’t looking for any trouble. They’re just looking to provide for their families, contribute to their communities.

They’re our neighbors. We know their kids. Too often, they’re forced to do what they do in a shadow economy where shady employers can exploit them by paying less than the minimum wage, making them work without overtime, not giving them any benefits. That pushes down standards for all workers. It’s bad for everybody. Because all the businesses that do play by the rules, that hire people legally, that pay them fairly — they’re at a competitive disadvantage. American workers end up being at a competitive disadvantage. It’s not fair. But that’s the broken system that we have today.

Now, over the past four years, we’ve tried to patch up some of the worst cracks in the system. We made border security a top priority. Today, we have twice as many border patrol agents as we did in 2004. We have more boots on the ground along our southern border than at any time in our history. And in part, by using technology more effectively, illegal crossings are near their lowest level in decades.

We focused our enforcement efforts on criminals who are here illegally and who are endangering our communities. And today, deportation of criminals is at its highest level ever.

And having put border security in place, having refocused on those who could do our communities harm, we also then took up the cause of the DREAMers, young people like Tolu who were brought to this country as children. We said that if you’re able to meet some basic criteria, like pursuing a higher education, then we’ll consider offering you the chance to come out of the shadows so you can continue to work here, and study here, and contribute to our communities legally.

So my administration has done what we can on our own. And we’ve got members of my administration here who’ve done outstanding work over the past few years to try to close up some of the gaps that exist in the system. But the system is still broken. And to truly deal with this issue, Congress needs to act. And that moment is now.

For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/06/11/remarks-president-immigration-reform

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June 15, 2013

Statement by the Press Secretary on the First Anniversary of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Process

A year ago today, the Administration took up the cause of “Dreamers” and took action to make our immigration system more representative of our values as a nation. By removing the threat of deportation for people brought to the country as children, we were able to continue to focus our enforcement efforts on criminals who endanger our communities rather than students who are pursuing an education.

These young men and women are Americans in their hearts, in their minds, in every way but on paper. And because the Administration acted, today thousands of ambitious, hardworking young people have been able to emerge from the shadows, no longer living in fear of deportation. But the steps we took were never meant to be a permanent solution. That’s why we need Congress to pass a bipartisan, commonsense immigration reform bill as soon as possible so that these “Dreamers” can keep contributing to this country and help us live up to our history as a nation of laws and a nation of immigrants.

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UPDATE: 

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28 Responses to Economics of Immigration Reform

  1. CR says:

    WH

    Friday, July 5, 2013

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings

    President and First Family depart for Camp David, Washington, DC.

    7:00 AM
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    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
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  2. CR says:

    Economics of Immigration Reform

    CBO Report: Immigration Reform Will Shrink the Deficit and Grow the Economy

    June 18, 2013 8:30 PM EDT Sylvia Mathews Burwell, Alan Krueger, Gene Sperling

    Today, the independent Congressional Budget Office released its score of the Senate’sbipartisan immigration bill, providing even more evidence that commonsense immigration reform is good for the budget and good for economic growth.

    CBO estimates that fixing our broken immigration system will reduce federal deficits by about $200 billion over the next 10 years, and about $700 billion in the second decade. The CBO analysis made clear that the additional taxes paid by new and legalizing immigrants would not only offset any new spending, but would be substantial enough to reduce the deficit over the 20-year window. A significant portion of the new taxes would be paid by previously undocumented immigrants. While many of these workers already pay federal taxes, millions more will pay payroll taxes once they are able to obtain legal status and work above board.

    CBO also found that commonsense immigration reform will increase real GDP by 3.3% in 2023, and 5.4% in 2033, a real increase of roughly $700 billion in 2023 and $1.4 trillion in 2033, due to higher labor force participation, increased capital investment, and increased productivity resulting from “technological advancements, such as new innovations and improvements in the production process.”

    CBO’s score follows other recent independent analyses which underscore that passing commonsense immigration reform is also one of the best, and often overlooked, ways to strengthen the solvency of the Social Security trust fund.

    For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/06/18/cbo-report-immigration-reform-will-shrink-deficit-and-grow-economy

    • CR says:

      Commonsense Immigration Reform Will Strengthen Social Security

      July 01, 2013 Sylvia Mathews Burwell, Alan Krueger, Cecilia Muñoz and Gene Sperling

      On Friday, we got even more proof of the high costs of inaction on bipartisan commonsense immigration reform.

      In a letter to Senator Rubio released on Friday, the independent Social Security Office of the Chief Actuary provided a long-term analysis of the bipartisan Senate-passed Immigration Reform bill, demonstrating that commonsense immigration reform will strengthen Social Security over the long-term. Reform will ensure full Social Security solvency through 2035 and reduce Social Security unfunded liabilities by nearly half a trillion dollars through 2087.

      The Social Security long-term report follows the recent analysis from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office that showed commonsense immigration reform is good for the budget and good for economic growth. The new Social Security report confirms that the bipartisan Senate-passed Immigration Reform Bill is also good for Social Security. The Senate-passed bill will strengthen the solvency of the Social Security Trust Fund in the short run and the long run by reforming the legal immigration system and by allowing undocumented workers to work above-board and thus ensuring that they pay payroll taxes.

      The Actuary’s long-term report confirms that the net effect of the bipartisan Senate-passed Immigration Reform Bill is to strengthen Social Security solvency. The Actuary found that the Senate-passed immigration reform bill will keep the Social Security Trust Fund fully solvent through 2035. (Without reform, the Social Security Actuary and Trustees expect the Social Security Trust Fund to be depleted by 2033.) The Chief Actuary notes that, “Even after depletion of the trust fund reserves, however, the actuarial status of the program is improved because continuing income would be sufficient to pay a higher percentage of scheduled benefits than under current law.” In fact, the Senate-passed bill will reduce the 75-year Social Security shortfall by nearly half a trillion dollars, in present value terms.

      READ MORE: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/07/01/commonsense-immigration-reform-will-strengthen-social-security

    • CR says:

      June 11, 2013

      Remarks by the President on Immigration Reform

      East Room

      10:38 A.M. EDT

      THE PRESIDENT: Good morning, everybody. Welcome to the White House. It is a pleasure to have so many distinguished Americans today from so many different walks of life. We’ve got Democrats and Republicans; we’ve got labor and business leaders up on stage; we have law enforcement and clergy — Americans who don’t see eye-to-eye on every issue, in fact, in some cases, don’t see eye-to-eye on just about any issue — (laughter) — but who are today standing united in support of the legislation that is front and center in Congress this week — a bipartisan bill to fix our broken immigration system.

      And I have to say — please give Tolu another round of applause. (Applause.) It takes a lot of courage to do what Tolu did — to step out of the shadows, to share her story, and to hope that, despite the risks, she could make a difference. But Tolu I think is representative of so many DREAMers out there who have worked so hard — and I’ve had a chance to meet so many of them who’ve been willing to give a face to the undocumented and have inspired a movement across America. And with each step, they’ve reminded us — time and again — what this debate is all about. This is not an abstract debate. This is about incredible young people who understand themselves to be Americans, who have done everything right but have still been hampered in achieving their American Dream.

      And they remind us that we’re a nation of immigrants. Throughout our history, the promise we found in those who come from every corner of the globe has always been one of our greatest strengths. It’s kept our workforce vibrant and dynamic. It’s kept our businesses on the cutting edge. It’s helped build the greatest economic engine that the world has ever known.

      When I speak to other world leaders, one of the biggest advantages we have economically is our demographics. We’re constantly replenishing ourselves with talent from across the globe. No other country can match that history. And what was true years ago is still true today — who’s beeping over there? (Laughter.) You’re feeling kind of self-conscious, aren’t you? (Laughter.) It’s okay.

      In recent years, one in four of America’s new small business owners were immigrants. One in four high-tech startups in America were founded by immigrants. Forty percent of Fortune 500 companies were started by a first- or second-generation American. Think about that — almost half of the Fortune 500 companies when they were started were started by first- or second-generation immigrants. So immigration isn’t just part of our national character. It is a driving force in our economy that creates jobs and prosperity for all of our citizens.

      Now, here’s the thing. Over the past two decades, our immigration system hasn’t kept pace with changing times and hasn’t matched up with our most cherished values.

      Right now, our immigration system invites the best and the brightest from all over the world to come and study at our top universities, and then once they finish — once they’ve gotten the training they need to build a new invention or create a new business — our system too often tells them to go back home so that other countries can reap the benefits, the new jobs, the new businesses, the new industries. That’s not smart. But that’s the broken system we have today.

      Right now, our immigration system keeps families apart for years at a time. Even for folks who, technically, under the legal immigration system, should be eligible to become citizens but it is so long and so cumbersome, so byzantine, that families end up being separated for years. Because of a backlog in visas, people who come here legally — who are ready to give it their all to earn their place in America — end up waiting for years to join their loved ones here in the United States. It’s not right. But that’s the broken system we have today.

      Right now, our immigration system has no credible way of dealing with the 11 million men and women who are in this country illegally. And, yes, they broke the rules; they didn’t wait their turn. They shouldn’t be let off easy. They shouldn’t be allowed to game the system. But at the same time, the vast majority of these individuals aren’t looking for any trouble. They’re just looking to provide for their families, contribute to their communities.

      They’re our neighbors. We know their kids. Too often, they’re forced to do what they do in a shadow economy where shady employers can exploit them by paying less than the minimum wage, making them work without overtime, not giving them any benefits. That pushes down standards for all workers. It’s bad for everybody. Because all the businesses that do play by the rules, that hire people legally, that pay them fairly — they’re at a competitive disadvantage. American workers end up being at a competitive disadvantage. It’s not fair. But that’s the broken system that we have today.

      Now, over the past four years, we’ve tried to patch up some of the worst cracks in the system. We made border security a top priority. Today, we have twice as many border patrol agents as we did in 2004. We have more boots on the ground along our southern border than at any time in our history. And in part, by using technology more effectively, illegal crossings are near their lowest level in decades.

      We focused our enforcement efforts on criminals who are here illegally and who are endangering our communities. And today, deportation of criminals is at its highest level ever.

      And having put border security in place, having refocused on those who could do our communities harm, we also then took up the cause of the DREAMers, young people like Tolu who were brought to this country as children. We said that if you’re able to meet some basic criteria, like pursuing a higher education, then we’ll consider offering you the chance to come out of the shadows so you can continue to work here, and study here, and contribute to our communities legally.

      So my administration has done what we can on our own. And we’ve got members of my administration here who’ve done outstanding work over the past few years to try to close up some of the gaps that exist in the system. But the system is still broken. And to truly deal with this issue, Congress needs to act. And that moment is now.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/06/11/remarks-president-immigration-reform

    • CR says:

      June 15, 2013

      Statement by the Press Secretary on the First Anniversary of <a href=" “>Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Process

      A year ago today, the Administration took up the cause of “Dreamers” and took action to make our immigration system more representative of our values as a nation. By removing the threat of deportation for people brought to the country as children, we were able to continue to focus our enforcement efforts on criminals who endanger our communities rather than students who are pursuing an education.

      These young men and women are Americans in their hearts, in their minds, in every way but on paper. And because the Administration acted, today thousands of ambitious, hardworking young people have been able to emerge from the shadows, no longer living in fear of deportation. But the steps we took were never meant to be a permanent solution. That’s why we need Congress to pass a bipartisan, commonsense immigration reform bill as soon as possible so that these “Dreamers” can keep contributing to this country and help us live up to our history as a nation of laws and a nation of immigrants.

    • CR says:

      July 10, 2013

      White House Report: The Economic Benefits of Fixing Our Broken Immigration System

      “So if we’re truly committed to strengthening our middle class and providing more ladders of opportunity to those who are willing to work hard to make it into the middle class, we’ve got to fix the system. We have to make sure that every business and every worker in America is playing by the same set of rules. We have to bring this shadow economy into the light so that everybody is held accountable — businesses for who they hire, and immigrants for getting on the right side of the law. That’s common sense. And that’s why we need comprehensive immigration reform.”

      – President Barack Obama, January 29, 2013

      America has always been a nation of immigrants, and throughout the nation’s history, immigrants from around the globe have kept our workforce vibrant, our businesses on the cutting edge, and helped to build the greatest economic engine in the world. However, America’s immigration system is broken and has not kept pace with changing times. Today, too many employers game the system by hiring undocumented workers and there are 11 million people living and working in the shadow economy. Neither is good for the economy or the country. It is time to fix our broken immigration system.

      Today, the President’s National Economic Council, Domestic Policy Council, Office of Management and Budget, and the Council of Economic Advisers released a report, The Economic Benefits of Fixing Our Broken Immigration System, detailing the range of benefits to the U.S. economy that would be realized from passage of commonsense immigration reform, and the high costs of inaction.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/07/10/white-house-report-economic-benefits-fixing-our-broken-immigration-syste

  3. CR says:

    US soccer<br />

    July 5, 2013
    U.S. Men vs. Guatemala
    8 p.m. PT Qualcomm Stadium
    San Diego, Calif

  4. Kat 4 Obama says:

    Love this topic, CR, good information as usual!

    >^..^<

  5. CR says:

    Employment Situation

    Released On 7/5/2013 8:30:00 AM For Jun, 2013

    Prior Prior Revised Consensus Consensus Range Actual
    Nonfarm Payrolls – M/M change 175,000 195,000 161,000 145,000 to 200,000 195,000
    Unemployment Rate – Level 7.6 % 7.5 % 7.4 % to 7.6 % 7.6 %
    Average Hourly Earnings – M/M change 0.0 % 0.1 % 0.2 % 0.1 % to 0.3 % 0.4 %
    Av Workweek – All Employees 34.5 hrs 34.5 hrs 34.4 hrs to 34.6 hrs 34.5 hrs
    Private Payrolls – M/M change 178,000 207,000 175,000 150,000 to 200,000 202,000

    Highlights
    The June employment situation largely came in better than expectations-at least on the payroll survey portion. Total payroll jobs in June increased 195,000 after rising a revised 195,000 in May (originally up 175,000). The consensus forecast was for a 161,000 gain for June. The net revisions for April and May were up 70,000. The unemployment rate held steady at 7.6 percent. The market median was for a 7.5 percent unemployment rate.

    Turning back to payroll data, private payrolls gained 202,000 after rising 207,000 in May (originally 178,000). Expectations were for a 175,000 advance.

    Turning to detail for the household survey, household employment in June rose 160,000 after a 319,000 increase the month before. The labor force increased 177,000, following a 420,000 jump in May.

    Once again, strength was in the private service-providing sector. Private service-providing jobs increased 194,000 after a 207,000 boost in May. The June increase was led by leisure & hospitality (up 75,000), professional & business services (up 53,000), retail trade (up 37,000), and health care (up 20,000).

    Goods-producing jobs advanced modestly, rising 8,000 after no change in May. Construction increased 13,000 in June while mining edged up 1,000. Manufacturing employment was decreased 6,000.

    Government jobs fell 7,000 in June, following a decrease of 12,000 the month before. Federal jobs fell 5,000; state jobs were down 15,000; and local government employment rose 13,000.

    There was a notable improvement in wages. Average hourly earnings jumped 0.4 percent in June after a modest 0.1 percent rise the month before. The consensus called for a 0.2 percent gain. The average workweek was 34.5 hours, equaling the number for May. The market consensus was for 34.5 hours.

    Turning to detail for the household survey, household employment in June rose 160,000 after a 319,000 increase the month before. The labor force increased 177,000, following a 420,000 jump in May.

    There was moderate improvement in payroll numbers but no progress on the unemployment rate. The big question is how the Fed will view the numbers. Most likely there will be caution in FedSpeak-waiting on more months of information on the labor market. Even the June payroll figures look good only compared to a low bar. But the consumer sector is improving as well as construction. Manufacturing still looks soft.

    For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/markets/economic-calendar/

  6. CR says:

    Jen Psaki: ‘We condemn’ Egypt violence

    7/5/13 7:22 PM EDT POLITICO44

    In a statement released Friday, State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said:

    “We condemn the violence that has taken place today in Egypt. We call on all Egyptian leaders to condemn the use of force and to prevent further violence among their supporters. As President Obama said, we expect the military to ensure that the rights of all Egyptians are protected, including the right to peaceful assembly, and we call on all who are protesting to do so peacefully. The voices of all who are protesting peacefully must be heard – including those who welcomed the events of earlier this week and those who supported President Morsy. The Egyptian people must come together to resolve their differences peacefully, without recourse to violence or the use of force.”

  7. CR says:

    WH

    Saturday, July 6, 2013

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Barack Obama meets with tne National Security Council on Egypt

    President and First Family vacation at Camp David
    Catoctin Mountain Park, Maryland

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  8. Kat 4 Obama says:

    Happy & HOPEful Saturday, CR and all friends!

    >^..^<

  9. CR says:

    July 06, 2013

    Readout of the President’s Meeting with the National Security Council Regarding the Situation in Egypt

    President Obama convened a secure conference call with the National Security Council today to review the very fluid situation in Egypt. The President condemned the ongoing violence across Egypt and expressed concern over the continued political polarization. He reiterated that the United States is not aligned with, and does not support, any particular Egyptian political party or group.

    In line with that position, the United States categorically rejects the false claims propagated by some in Egypt that we are working with specific political parties or movements to dictate how Egypt’s transition should proceed. We remain committed to the Egyptian people and their aspirations for democracy, economy opportunity, and dignity. But the future path of Egypt can only be determined by the Egyptian people.

    During this transitional period, we call on all Egyptians to come together in an inclusive process that allows for the participation of all groups and political parties. Throughout that process, the United States will continue to engage the Egyptian people in a spirit of partnership, consistent with our longstanding friendship and shared interests – including our interest in a transition to sustainable democracy.

    We urge all Egyptian leaders to condemn the use of force and to prevent further violence among their supporters, just as we urge all those demonstrating to do so peacefully. As Egyptians look forward, we call on all sides to bridge Egypt’s divisions, reject reprisals, and join together to restore stability and Egypt’s democracy.

  10. CR says:

    July 06, 2013

    President Obama Updated on the Plane Crash in San Francisco

    Soon after the plane crash in San Francisco, CA, the President was made aware of the incident by Lisa Monaco, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism. The President will continue to be updated as new information becomes available. The President expressed his gratitude for the first responders and directed his team to stay in constant contact with the federal, state and local partners as they investigate and respond to this event. His thoughts and prayers go out to the families who lost a loved one and all those affected by the crash.

    • CR says:

      Asiana Airlines Contact Information

      Asiana Airlines has established telephone numbers for inquiries regarding the crash of Asiana Flight #214 in San Francisco, California.

      For callers in the U.S. 1-800-227-4262
      For callers in Korea 080-669-8000

      아시아나항공 사고 관련 연락처

      샌프란시스코에서 착륙사고가 난 아시아나 여객기 #214에 관련된 문의를 위한 아시아나 항공 전화 번호는 아래와 같습니다.

      * 미국내에서 전화할때 1-800-227-4262
      * 한국내에서 전화할때 080-669-8000

    • CR says:

      2 killed, 182 hospitalized as S. Korean jet crash-lands in San Francisco

      Saturday, July 6, 2013 By Del Quentin Wilber, Ashley Halsey III and Lori Aratani – washingtonpost

      SAN FRANCISCO — At least two passengers were killed and scores were injured Saturday after a Boeing 777 airliner arriving from South Korea crash-landed and caught fire on the runway at San Francisco International Airport, authorities said.

      Airport spokesman Doug Yakel said 182 of the 307 passengers and crew were taken to hospitals, and 49 were reported in serious or critical condition.

      At an earlier news conference, the San Francisco fire chief had said that 60 people were unaccounted for, but officials reported later that they all had been located.

      The crash was the first large plane to go down in U.S. airspace since November 2001, when an American Airlines Airbus A300 crashed on takeoff from New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport, killing all 260 people aboard as well as five people on the ground.

      In Saturday’s crash in San Francisco, passengers described a normal approach that was punctuated by a sudden acceleration of the engines just as they expected the wheels to touch down. That conformed to the observation of witnesses who said the plane struggled to reach the beginning of the runway.

      After the landing, the red-and-white jet was scorched from the cockpit area to just behind the wings, the aluminum skin peeled from the top of the aircraft. Emergency escape slides were deployed from the doorways, and some people who had been on board were seen moving away from the aircraft.

      For more: http://goo.gl/CP0tB

  11. CR says:

    Please join me in lighting a candle for our President, First Family and our Nation.

    http://www.gratefulness.org/candles/candles.cfm?l=eng&gi=PBO

  12. CR says:

    WH

    Sunday, July 7, 2013

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President and First Family depart Camp David, Washington, DC.

    President and First Family return to Washington, DC.

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  13. CR says:

    Sunday talk show tip sheet

    By HADAS GOLD | 7/5/13 4:42 PM EDT

    “Meet the Press” on NBC
    • Sen. Robert Menendez (D-N.J.), chairman, Senate Foreign Relations Committee
    • Rep. Raul Labrador (R-Idaho)
    • Mohamed El Baradei, top negotiator for the Egyptian opposition and pro-reform leader

    “Face the Nation” on CBS
    • Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.)
    • Rep. Mike McCaul (R-Texas), chairman, House Homeland Security Committee
    • Rep. Xavier Becerra of California, chairman, House Democratic Caucus

    “This Week” on ABC
    • George W. and Laura Bush, former president and first lady
    • Mohamed Tawfi, Egypt’s ambassador to the U.S.

    “State of the Union” on CNN
    • Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey
    • Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.), chairman, House Intelligence Committee

    “Fox News Sunday” on Fox
    • Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.)
    • Sen. Jack Reed (D-R.I.)
    • Texas Gov. Rick Perry (R)

    “Political Capital” on Bloomberg TV
    • Aaron David Miller, president, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

    “Newsmakers” on C-SPAN
    • American Medical Association President Ardis Hoven

    “Al Punto” on Univision
    • Treasury Secretary Jack Lew

  14. CR says:

    Solar-Powered Plane Completes Flight Over US

    July 07, 2013 VOA News

    A solar-powered aircraft has completed its history-making cross-country trip over the United States.

    The experimental Solar Impulse landed at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport late Saturday, three hours ahead of schedule after an unexpected tear was found on its left wing. The plane’s mission team said neither the pilot nor the aircraft appeared to be in danger, but an early landing was planned anyway.

    The team called the tear an obstacle that pilot André Borschberg “skillfully faced.”

    Powered by about 11,000 solar cells, the Swiss-made Solar Impulse started its path across the U.S. in San Francisco in early May, making stopovers in five cities before finishing its journey in New York. The plane took off for New York from a suburban Washington airport before daybreak Saturday.

    The two-month flight was a test for a planned 2015 flight around the Earth with a more powerful version of the aircraft.

  15. CR says:

    ********************
    THIS POST IS NOW CLOSED NBLB

    Come on over to my newest post titled: ” Transatlantic Trade & Investment Partnership (T-TIP)”

    ********************

    To get to the newest post click on “HOME” at the top of the thread

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