Executive Order: Overtime Pay Compensation

The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (abbreviated as FLSA; also referred to as the Wages and Hours Bill) is a federal statute of the United States. The FLSA established a national minimum wage, guaranteed ‘time-and-a-half‘ for overtime in certain jobs, and prohibited most employment of minors in “oppressive child labor,” a term that is defined in the statute. It applies to employees engaged in interstate commerce or employed by an enterprise engaged in commerce or in the production of goods for commerce, unless the employer can claim an exemption from coverage.

On Saturday, June 25, 1938, to avoid pocket vetoes 9 days after Congress had  adjourned, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a Democrat,  signed 121 bills. Among these bills  was a landmark law in the Nation’s social and economic development —  Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA). Against a history of judicial opposition,  the depression-born FLSA had survived, not unscathed, more than a year of  Congressional altercation. In its final form, the act applied to industries whose  combined employment represented only about one-fifth of the labor force. In these  industries, it banned oppressive child labor and set the minimum hourly wage at  25 cents, and the maximum workweek at 44 hours.

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Overtime Pay Said to Reach More Workers Under Obama Order

3/12/14 By Angela Greiling Keane – bloomberg

Some U.S. workers who are deemed ineligible for overtime compensation under what’s known as the “white-collar exemption” would be able to collect extra pay under an executive order President Barack Obama plans to issue tomorrow, according to a White House official.

The order will direct the Labor Department to modify overtime rules so millions more people will be eligible for overtime pay for working more than 40 hours a week, said the White House official, who requested anonymity because the plan hasn’t been announced.

Workers now classified as executive, administrative or professional may include managers of fast-food restaurants and convenience stores who could receive overtime pay under the new rules, the official said.

President George W. Bush in 2004 set $455 per week as the threshold for what constitutes a white-collar worker for overtime pay purposes. The White House official didn’t say what the new threshold would be.

The move would mark the latest in a series of executive orders this year from Obama, who said in his State of the Union address in January that he plans to use that power to make changes rather than waiting for Congress to act. Obama is also trying to boost pay for lower-wage workers by increasing the federal minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. That change would require the approval of Congress.

The push for a higher federal minimum wage has become a centerpiece of Obama’s attempt to frame Democratic Party priorities before the November midterm elections that will decide control of the U.S. House and Senate.

Minimum Wage
Republicans, including House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, and business groups say that raising the minimum wage would lead to a reduction in jobs, hurting those it aims to help. A Congressional Budget Office report last month found that raising the rate in three steps as Obama proposes would reduce U.S. jobs by 500,000, or 0.3 percent, while lifting 900,000 people out of poverty.

Sixty-nine percent of Americans, including 45 percent of Republicans, support the president’s call to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10 over the next three years, according to a Bloomberg National Poll. Twenty-eight percent of poll respondents oppose such action.

While the wage-increase proposal resonates with most Americans, the poll indicates that Republicans are finding persuasive counter-arguments, including the potential loss of jobs.

2014 SOTU - Raise the minimum wage

Raising the Minimum Wage to $10.10. As he said in his State of the Union speech on January 28th, President Obama will continue to call on Congress to pass the Harkin-Miller plan to raise the Federal minimum wage for working Americans in stages to $10.10 and index it to inflation thereafter, while also raising the minimum wage for tipped workers for the first time in over 20 years. The President knows this is important for workers and good for business.

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22 Responses to Executive Order: Overtime Pay Compensation

  1. CR says:

    WH

    Thursday, March 12, 2014

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    Vice President Biden meets with Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk of Ukraine
    The White House

    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    White House Press Secretary Jay Carney briefs the pres

    2:00 PM
    2:20 PM ET
    President Obama delivers remarks and signs a Presidential Memorandum on modernizing overtime protections
    East Room

    3:00 PM
    President Obama and Vice President meet with Secretary of the Treasury Lew
    Oval Office

    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    5:30 PM
    President Obama meets with Top Hispanic lawmakers Rep. Xavier Becerra (Calif.), Luis Gutierrez (Ill.) and Ruben Hinojosa to discuss immigration
    Oval Office

    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    Vice President Biden Speaks to The American Ireland Fund’s 22nd Annual National Gala
    Washington, D.C.

    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  2. CR says:

    Overtime Pay Compensation Executive Order

    .

    • CR says:

      The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (abbreviated as FLSA; also referred to as the Wages and Hours Bill) is a federal statute of the United States. The FLSA established a national minimum wage, guaranteed ‘time-and-a-half‘ for overtime in certain jobs, and prohibited most employment of minors in “oppressive child labor,” a term that is defined in the statute. It applies to employees engaged in interstate commerce or employed by an enterprise engaged in commerce or in the production of goods for commerce, unless the employer can claim an exemption from coverage.

      On Saturday, June 25, 1938, to avoid pocket vetoes 9 days after Congress had  adjourned, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a Democrat,  signed 121 bills. Among these bills  was a landmark law in the Nation’s social and economic development —  Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA). Against a history of judicial opposition,  the depression-born FLSA had survived, not unscathed, more than a year of  Congressional altercation. In its final form, the act applied to industries whose  combined employment represented only about one-fifth of the labor force. In these  industries, it banned oppressive child labor and set the minimum hourly wage at  25 cents, and the maximum workweek at 44 hours.

      • CR says:

        Fair Labor Standards Act Anniversary Reminds Us Why We Need to Raise the Minimum Wage

        Danielle Gray, Seth Harris, Alan Krueger, Gene Sperling June 25, 2013 03:00 PM EDT

        In his State of the Union, President Obama laid out a simple principle: “in the wealthiest nation on Earth, no one who works full-time should have to live in poverty.” Today, we came together with Vice President Biden to commemorate an important milestone in upholding that principle – the 75th anniversary of the Fair Labor Standards Act – while making clear what we still need to do to make it a reality.

        We can thank the Fair Labor Standards Act, signed into law by President Franklin Roosevelt, for several of the most important protections in place for workers today. The FLSA created the minimum wage, put in place restrictions on child labor, and required that when employees work more than a standard workweek, they get paid overtime.

        But a look back at history also serves as a call to action. Over the past three decades, the minimum wage has failed to keep pace with inflation – eroding its value for working families. A full-time worker making the minimum wage now earns only $14,500 a year – leaving a family with two kids below the poverty line even once tax credits are taken into account. That’s why in February, President Obama called on Congress to raise the minimum wage – including for tipped workers – bring it back to the value it had at the beginning of the Reagan Administration, and permanently index it to inflation.

        Today, we heard from workers making the minimum wage from across the country – from a call center worker from Indiana to a valet attendant from Denver – who spoke about how important a minimum wage increase can be for their families. As President Obama has said, for these families, a minimum wage increase “could mean the difference between groceries or the food bank; rent or eviction; scraping by or finally getting ahead.” Indeed, for a typical working family making $20,000 to $30,000 a year, a minimum wage increase could provide enough to cover six months of housing or their entire budget for groceries in a year. What we also heard from these workers is that they are proud of their work – and they want the dignity that comes with supporting their families with their work.

        We also discussed how a minimum wage increase can be good for growth and the broader economy. It can, as leading economists have pointed out, increase spending as workers use their additional earnings to purchase more goods and services. And as several studies have shown comparing different policies across states and localities, a higher minimum wage can be achieved without hurting employment. At the same time, increasing the minimum wage can help reduce inequality: indeed, studies have found that at least 10 to 20 percent of the increase in inequality since 1980 can be traced to the erosion of the minimum wage due to inflation.

        What we need now is for Congress to act. When Franklin Roosevelt signed the Fair Labor Standards Act into law, he stated that “without question it starts us toward a better standard of living and increases purchasing power to buy the products of farm and factory.” As we celebrate this landmark, it serves as a reminder of the remaining work needed to continue that effort.

    • CR says:

      Overtime Pay Said to Reach More Workers Under Obama Order

      3/12/14 By Angela Greiling Keane – bloomberg

      Some U.S. workers who are deemed ineligible for overtime compensation under what’s known as the “white-collar exemption” would be able to collect extra pay under an executive order President Barack Obama plans to issue tomorrow, according to a White House official.

      The order will direct the Labor Department to modify overtime rules so millions more people will be eligible for overtime pay for working more than 40 hours a week, said the White House official, who requested anonymity because the plan hasn’t been announced.

      Workers now classified as executive, administrative or professional may include managers of fast-food restaurants and convenience stores who could receive overtime pay under the new rules, the official said.

      President George W. Bush in 2004 set $455 per week as the threshold for what constitutes a white-collar worker for overtime pay purposes. The White House official didn’t say what the new threshold would be.

      The move would mark the latest in a series of executive orders this year from Obama, who said in his State of the Union address in January that he plans to use that power to make changes rather than waiting for Congress to act. Obama is also trying to boost pay for lower-wage workers by increasing the federal minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. That change would require the approval of Congress.

      The push for a higher federal minimum wage has become a centerpiece of Obama’s attempt to frame Democratic Party priorities before the November midterm elections that will decide control of the U.S. House and Senate.

      Minimum Wage
      Republicans, including House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, and business groups say that raising the minimum wage would lead to a reduction in jobs, hurting those it aims to help. A Congressional Budget Office report last month found that raising the rate in three steps as Obama proposes would reduce U.S. jobs by 500,000, or 0.3 percent, while lifting 900,000 people out of poverty.

      Sixty-nine percent of Americans, including 45 percent of Republicans, support the president’s call to raise the federal minimum wage to $10.10 over the next three years, according to a Bloomberg National Poll. Twenty-eight percent of poll respondents oppose such action.

      While the wage-increase proposal resonates with most Americans, the poll indicates that Republicans are finding persuasive counter-arguments, including the potential loss of jobs.

    • CR says:

      March 13, 2014

      FACT SHEET: Opportunity for All: Rewarding Hard Work by Strengthening Overtime Protections

      After weathering the Great Recession and through five years of hard work and determination, America is creating jobs and rebuilding our economy. But as a result of shifts that have taken hold over more than three decades, too many Americans are working harder than ever just to get by, let alone to get ahead.

      President Obama believes that, in America, if you work hard and take responsibility, you should have the opportunity to succeed. That’s why he has pledged to make 2014 a year of action, working with Congress where they’re willing, but using his phone and his pen wherever he can to build real, lasting economic security for the middle class and those working hard to become a part of the middle class.

      As part of that effort, today, President Obama is directing the Secretary of Labor to begin the process of addressing overtime pay protections to help make sure millions of workers are paid a fair wage for a hard day’s work and rules are simplified for employers and workers alike.

      Basic Overtime Protections Have Eroded

      The overtime rules that establish the 40-hour workweek, a linchpin of the middle class, have eroded over the years. As a result, millions of salaried workers have been left without the protections of overtime or sometimes even the minimum wage. For example, a convenience store manager or a fast food shift supervisor or an office worker may be expected to work 50 or 60 hours a week or more, making barely enough to keep a family out of poverty, and not receive a dime of overtime pay. It’s even possible for employers to pay workers less than the minimum wage per hour.

      The overtime and minimum wage rules are set in the Fair Labor Standards Act, originally passed by Congress in 1938, and apply broadly to private-sector workers. However, there are some exceptions to these rules, which the Department of Labor has the authority to define through regulation. One of the most commonly used exemptions is for “executive, administrative and professional” employees, the so-called “white collar” exemption.

      Workers who are paid hourly wages or who earn below a certain salary are generally protected by overtime regulations, while those above the threshold who perform executive, professional or administrative duties are not. That threshold has failed to keep up with inflation, only being updated twice in the last 40 years and leaving millions of low-paid, salaried workers without these basic protections. Specifically:

      * In 1975 the Department of Labor set the threshold below which white collar workers were entitled to overtime pay at $250 per week.

      * In 2004 that threshold was set at $455 per week (the equivalent of $561 in today’s dollars). This is below today’s poverty line for a worker supporting a family of four, and well below 1975 levels in inflation adjusted terms.

      Today, only 12 percent of salaried workers fall below the threshold that would guarantee them overtime and minimum wage protections (compared with 18 percent in 2004 and 65 percent in 1975). Many of the remaining 88 percent of salaried workers are ineligible for these protections because they fall within the white collar exemptions. Many recognize that these regulations are outdated, which is why states like New York and California have set higher salary thresholds.

      At the same time, employers and workers alike have difficulty navigating the existing regulations, and many recognize that the rules should be modernized to better fit today’s economy.

      Details of the Presidential Memorandum

      Improving the overtime regulations consistent with the Memorandum the President will sign today could benefit millions of people who are working harder but falling further behind. The Fair Labor Standards Act protects over 135 million workers in more than 7.3 million workplaces nationwide.

      The Presidential Memorandum instructs the Secretary of Labor to update regulations regarding who qualifies for overtime protection. In so doing, the Secretary shall consider how the regulations could be revised to:

      * Update existing protections in keeping with the intention of the Fair Labor Standards Act.
      * Address the changing nature of the American workplace.
      * Simplify the overtime rules to make them easier for both workers and businesses to understand and apply.

  3. vitaminlover says:

    Glad to see overtime pay be improved. Some employers are so shady about it. They keep the employees hours under a 40 hour work week and then if they have to work over they shaft them by telling them it has to be over a total amount of 40 hours. Hope that they get treated more fairly.

  4. CR says:

    Jobless Claims in U.S. Fall to Lowest Level Since November

    Mar 13, 2014 5:47 AM PT By Shobhana Chandra – bloomberg

    The number of Americans filing applications for unemployment benefits unexpectedly fell last week to the lowest level since the end of November, a sign of further improvement in the labor market.

    Jobless claims dropped by 9,000 to 315,000 in the week ended March 8, a Labor Department report showed today in Washington. The median forecast of 53 economists surveyed by Bloomberg called for a rise to 330,000. Continuing claims decreased for a third straight week.

    Employers cutting back on dismissals may be encouraged to take on more workers once demand picks up. Faster gains in hiring will help to boost consumer spending, the biggest part of the economy, after harsh winter weather weighed on everything from retail sales to home purchases earlier this year.

    “The labor market continues to improve,” said Brian Jones, senior U.S. economist at Societe Generale in New York who accurately forecast the number of claims. “We’re likely to get eye-popping numbers for March payrolls. The economy is not in a soft patch.”

    For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-03-13/jobless-claims-in-u-s-decline-to-lowest-level-since-november.html

  5. CR says:

    Retail Sales in U.S. Increase for First Time in Three Months

    Mar 13, 2014 5:48 AM PT By Victoria Stilwell – bloomberg

    Retail sales in the U.S. rose in February for the first time in three months, a sign consumers are starting to shake off the effects of the harsh weather that had curbed spending even more than previously estimated.

    The 0.3 percent advance followed a 0.6 percent drop in January that was larger than initially reported, Commerce Department figures showed today in Washington. The median forecast of 84 economists surveyed by Bloomberg called for a 0.2 percent advance. The rebound in demand was broad-based with nine of 13 major categories showing increases.

    Americans ventured out to shop even as colder-than-normal temperatures and severe snowstorms blanketed parts of the U.S., showing the economic expansion is regaining momentum. Continued improvement in the labor market and gains in wages will be needed to sustain household purchases that are being spurred by rising stocks and home values.

    “We’ll see a little bit more traction on the consumer side as the weather improves and people get a little bit more willing to leave the house,” said Russell Price, senior economist at Ameriprise Financial Inc. in Detroit and the best forecaster of retail sales over the past two years, according to Bloomberg calculations. “There is building pent-up demand across the economy.”

    For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-03-13/retail-sales-in-u-s-increase-for-first-time-in-three-months.html

  6. CR says:

    9:00 AM ET
    Vice President Biden meets with Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk of Ukraine
    The White House

    • CR says:

      March 13, 2014

      Readout of the Vice President’s Meeting with Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk

      The Vice President met with Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk this morning at the White House. The Vice President commended the Prime Minister for the Ukrainian government’s commitment to move forward to stabilize Ukraine and its economy. He reiterated that the United States stands firmly behind Ukraine and the Ukrainian people in ensuring Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. The Vice President underscored the continued strong support of the United States, and his personal support, as Ukrainians chart their own course for a democratic future.

  7. CR says:

    2:20 PM ET
    President Obama delivers remarks and signs a Presidential Memorandum on modernizing overtime protections
    East Room

    WhiteHouse.gov http://www.whitehouse.gov/live

    CSPAN http://www.c-span.org/video/?318290-2/president-signs-minimum-wage-executive-order

    • CR says:

      March 13, 2014

      Remarks by the President On Overtime Pay

      East Room

      2:27 P.M. EDT

      THE PRESIDENT: Thank you, everybody, thank you. (Applause.) Thank you so much. Please. Thank you, guys. Please have a seat.

      Well, welcome to the White House. Before I get started, I just want to acknowledge somebody who is working so hard on behalf of America’s workers each and every day, our outstanding Secretary of Labor, Tom Perez. So give him a big round of applause. (Applause.) There you go. Tom must have brought some of his family with him. (Laughter.)

      We’ve got a lot of honored guests here. We’ve got middle-class workers who rely on overtime pay. We’ve got business owners who believe in treating their employees right both because it’s the right thing to do but also because it’s good for business. And thanks to the hard work and resilience of Americans like the ones who are here today, our economy has been growing for a number of years now.

      Our businesses have created more than 8.5 million new jobs over the last four years. The unemployment rate is at the lowest it’s been in over five years. But in many ways, the trends that have really battered middle-class families for decades have gotten worse, not better. Those at the top are doing better than ever, but for the average family, wages have barely budged. And too many Americans are working harder and harder just to get by.

      So we’ve got to reverse those trends. We’ve got to build an economy that works for everybody, not just for a few. And we’ve got to restore the basic notion of opportunity that is at the heart of the American experience: Opportunity for everyone; the belief that here in America, it doesn’t matter where you started, if you are willing to work hard and act responsibly, you’ve got a chance to get ahead.

      So at my State of the Union at the beginning of the year I laid out an opportunity agenda to give more Americans a chance to succeed. It’s got four parts. Number one, making sure we’re creating more good jobs that pay good wages. Number two, making sure that we’re training more Americans with the skills that are needed to fill those jobs. Number three, making sure every child in America gets a world-class education. And number four, which is what I’m going to be focusing on today, making sure that our economy rewards the hard work of every American.

      Now, making work pay means making sure women earn equal pay for equal work. (Applause.) It means giving women the chance to have a baby without sacrificing jobs, or a day off to care for a sick child or parent without worrying about making ends meet. It means making sure every American has access to quality, affordable health care that’s there when you need it. So if there’s somebody out there that you know that doesn’t have health insurance, make sure they go on healthcare.gov — (laughter) — before March 31st. That’s a priority. (Applause.) And it means wages and paychecks that help to support a family.

      Profitable corporations like Costco see paying higher wages as way to reduce turnover and boost productivity. And I’ve asked business owners to do what they can to give their employee a raise. As some of you saw, I was at The Gap yesterday — or the day before yesterday in Manhattan — and fortunately Malia and Sasha liked the sweaters I bought them. (Laughter.) But part of what I wanted to highlight was the fact that, on its own, The Gap decided to give a raise to 64,000 employees across the country.

      I’ve now called on Congress to give America a raise by raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. (Applause.) And in this year of action, while Congress decides what it’s going to do — whether it’s going to do anything about this issue — and I hope that it does, and I know Democrats are pushing hard to get minimum wage legislation passed — I’m going to do what I can on my own to raise wages for more hardworking Americans. So a few weeks ago I signed an executive order requiring federal contractors to pay their employees a fair wage of at least $10.10 an hour. Today, I’m going to use my pen to give more Americans the chance to earn the overtime pay that they deserve.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/03/13/remarks-president-overtime-pay

  8. CR says:

    Senate reaches unemployment deal

    March 13, 2014, 04:54 pm By Vicki Needham – TheHill

    The Senate reached a bipartisan deal on Thursday that would renew unemployment benefits for five months.

    The plan put together by Sens. Jack Reed (D-R.I.) and Dean Heller (R-Nev.) would provide retroactive benefits to those who lost federal help after the program expired on Dec. 28.

    “There are a lot of good people looking for work and I am pleased we’re finally able to reach a strong, bipartisan consensus to get them some help,” Reed said.
    The bill is cosponsored by a broad swath of Democrats and Republicans, including Sens. Susan Collins (R-Maine), Rob Portman (R-Ohio), Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), and Mark Kirk (R-Ill.), Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Cory Booker (D-N.J.), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Dick Durbin (D-Ill.).

    It would be considered after the Senate returns to Washington following a one-week recess.

    The deal combines components from Republican and Democratic proposals.

    It would use several offsets to pay for the $10 billion cost of extending the benefits, including pension smoothing provisions from the 2012 highway bill, which were set to phase out this year, and extending customs user fees through 2024.

    The bill also includes an additional offset allowing single-employer pension plans to prepay their flat rate premiums to the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation (PBGC).

    The measure would also prevent millionaires and billionaires from receiving the benefits.

    The proposal also includes language pushed by Collins to strengthen reemployment and eligibility assessment (REA) and Re-employment Services (RES) programs, which would provide enhanced, personalized assessments and referrals to reemployment services when unemployed workers begin their 27th week of benefits.

    • CR says:

      March 13, 2014

      Statement by the Press Secretary

      We are pleased Democrats and Republicans in the Senate have come together around an agreement to extend emergency unemployment benefits for the more than 2 million Americans who have been fighting every day to find a job. The President has repeatedly called on Congress to take action on a compromise solution to extend this vital lifeline for millions of hard-working Americans as they look for work and support their families. This is not just the right thing to do for these Americans looking for work, it’s the right thing to do for our economy. The President urges the Senate to pass the bill and for the House to do the same so that he can sign it into law.

    • CR says:

      Senate passes child care bill

      3/13/14 3:49 PM EDT Updated: 3/13/14 6:58 PM EDT By MAGGIE SEVERNS – POLITICO

      A child care bill 18 years in the making passed the Senate on Thursday in a vote that lawmakers hope is a symbol of more compromise and collaboration to come.

      Sens. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) and Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) painstakingly crafted the update to the child care law over the course of two years, and in recent weeks, the senators — along with Sens. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) and Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) — have held it up as a return to regular order in a bitterly divided Senate.

      “Today will be a big victory for America’s children, and I think it’s a great victory for the Senate,” Mikulski said. “This is the way the Senate should be.”

      Alexander praised other members of the chamber for showing “restraint and courtesy” as the bill moved through the amendment process. “We won’t be able to do this every time,” but it’s a step, Alexander said.

      “We want to change the tone so we can change the tide,” Burr said earlier this week. This desire to bring regular order to the Senate echoed many times over the two days the bill was debated on the floor.

      The law, the Child Care and Development Block Grant, helps states provide child care to families of low-income households. The bill that passed Thursday would make a range of updates to the federal child care program, which hadn’t been taken up by the Senate since it was passed in 1996: It would require employers to perform background checks on child care workers for the first time; create a website that allows parents to view local child care services; and place a greater emphasis on the quality of child care — a big priority for advocates.

      Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2014/03/senate-child-care-bill-104643.html?hp=r15

  9. CR says:

    5:30 PM ET
    President Obama meets with Top Hispanic lawmakers Rep. Xavier Becerra (Calif.), Luis Gutierrez (Ill.) and Ruben Hinojosa to discuss immigration
    Oval Office

    • CR says:

      March 13, 2014

      Readout of the Vice President’s Meeting with Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk

      The Vice President met with Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk this morning at the White House. The Vice President commended the Prime Minister for the Ukrainian government’s commitment to move forward to stabilize Ukraine and its economy. He reiterated that the United States stands firmly behind Ukraine and the Ukrainian people in ensuring Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. The Vice President underscored the continued strong support of the United States, and his personal support, as Ukrainians chart their own course for a democratic future.

  10. CR says:

    8:00 PM ET
    Vice President Biden Speaks to The American Ireland Fund’s 22nd Annual National Gala
    Washington, D.C.

  11. CR says:

    *******************
    THIS POST IS NOW CLOSED NBLB

    Come on over to my newest post titled: ” Happy St. Patrick’s Day 2014″

    ********************

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