Social Security Amendments of 1965 Established Medicare & Medicaid

socialsecurity

The Social Security Amendments of 1965Pub.L. 89–97, 79 Stat. 286, enacted July 30, 1965, was legislation in the United States whose most important provisions resulted in creation of two programs: Medicare and Medicaid. The legislation initially provided federal health insurance for the elderly (over 65) and for poor families.

History

Many politicians were involved in drafting the final bill that was introduced to the United States Congress in March 1965. On July 30, 1965 President Lyndon B. Johnson (D) signed the bill into law.

The concept of national health insurance began in the early 20th century in the United States and then came to prominence during the Truman administration. Between 1958 and 1964, controversy grew and a bill was drafted. The signing of the act, as part of Johnson’s Great Society, began an era with a greater emphasis on public health issues. Medicare and Medicaid became the United States’ first public health insurance programs. The legislation was vigorously opposed by the American Medical Association until it had been enacted, following which the AMA cooperated in its implementation.

In 1912 Theodore Roosevelt included social insurance for sickness in the platform of his Progressive Party (United States, 1912). Around 1915 the group American Association for Labor Legislation attempted to introduce a medical insurance bill to some state legislatures. These attempts were not successful, and as a result controversy about national insurance came about. National groups supporting the idea of government health insurance included the AFL-CIO, the American Nurses AssociationNational Association of Social Workers, and the Socialist Party USA. The most prominent opponent of national medical insurance was the American Medical Association (AMA); others included the American Hospital Association, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Life Insurance Association of People.

Previous administrations

In 1935, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) signed the Social Security Act, medical benefits were left out of the bill. The committee that Roosevelt appointed to study issues related to Social Security wanted to include health insurance in the bill. However, the committee was concerned that amending the bill to include health insurance would kill the entire bill. Harry Truman took on the idea of national medical care and tried to integrate it into his Fair Deal program. Truman’s attempts were also unsuccessful, though during his presidency the fight for national medical care became specific to the aged population.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Security_Act_of_1965

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On the Horizon: The 2015 White House Conference on Aging

Cecilia Muñoz July 29, 2014 01:25 PM EDT

Today at the White House, I was delighted to host a roundtable discussion with leaders from across the aging community who came together to discuss the White House Conference on Aging, which will take place in 2015 – the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security.

Just yesterday, the Medicare Trustees released their annual report finding that, since their report last year, the life of the Medicare Trust Fund has been extended by four additional years to 2030. When this Administration first took office, the Trust Fund was projected to go bankrupt more than a dozen years sooner, in 2017. The Trustees also project that – for the second year in a row – Part B premiums will not increase, allowing seniors to keep more of their Social Security cost-of-living increase.

Thanks in part to the Affordable Care Act, we have improved the affordability of the program, while at the same time helping Medicare work better for seniors. For example, we are closing the prescription drug coverage gap or “donut hole” to make medications more affordable for Medicare beneficiaries. Just today, we learned that 8.2 million seniors and people with disabilities saved $11.5 billion since 2010 – over $1,000 on average for people hitting the donut hole. Additionally, Medicare now provides coverage without cost-sharing for many preventive benefits to help keep older Americans healthy. The Affordable Care Act also responds to older Americans’ desire to remain independent in their communities by creating incentives for states to provide the services and supports that help people remain at home as they age.

For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2014/07/29/horizon-2015-white-house-conference-aging

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Social Security Timeline: http://www.ssa.gov/history/1930.html

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Learn more about Social Security: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/

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18 Responses to Social Security Amendments of 1965 Established Medicare & Medicaid

  1. CR says:

    WH

    Wednesday, July 30, 2014

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    11:30 AM
    First Lady Michelle Obama participates in a Roundtable with Young African Leaders
    The Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington, D.C.

    12:00 PM
    President Obama delivers remarks on the economy
    Uptown Theater, Kansas City, Missouri

    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    2:15 PM
    President Obama departs Kansas City, Missouri en route Washington, DC

    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    4:25 PM
    President Obama arrives Joint Base Andrews
    Joint Base Andrews

    4:40 PM
    President Obama arrives the White House
    South Lawn

    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

    President Obama departs Kansas City, Missouri en route Washington, DC

  2. CR says:

    Social Security Amendments of 1965 Established Medicare & Medicaid

    The Social Security Amendments of 1965, Pub.L. 89–97, 79 Stat. 286, enacted July 30, 1965, was legislation in the United States whose most important provisions resulted in creation of two programs: Medicare and Medicaid. The legislation initially provided federal health insurance for the elderly (over 65) and for poor families.

    History

    Many politicians were involved in drafting the final bill that was introduced to the United States Congress in March 1965. On July 30, 1965 President Lyndon B. Johnson (D) signed the bill into law.

    The concept of national health insurance began in the early 20th century in the United States and then came to prominence during the Truman administration. Between 1958 and 1964, controversy grew and a bill was drafted. The signing of the act, as part of Johnson’s Great Society, began an era with a greater emphasis on public health issues. Medicare and Medicaid became the United States’ first public health insurance programs. The legislation was vigorously opposed by the American Medical Association until it had been enacted, following which the AMA cooperated in its implementation.

    In 1912 Theodore Roosevelt included social insurance for sickness in the platform of his Progressive Party (United States, 1912). Around 1915 the group American Association for Labor Legislation attempted to introduce a medical insurance bill to some state legislatures. These attempts were not successful, and as a result controversy about national insurance came about. National groups supporting the idea of government health insurance included the AFL-CIO, the American Nurses Association, National Association of Social Workers, and the Socialist Party USA. The most prominent opponent of national medical insurance was the American Medical Association (AMA); others included the American Hospital Association, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Life Insurance Association of People.

    Previous administrations

    In 1935, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) signed the Social Security Act, medical benefits were left out of the bill. The committee that Roosevelt appointed to study issues related to Social Security wanted to include health insurance in the bill. However, the committee was concerned that amending the bill to include health insurance would kill the entire bill. Harry Truman took on the idea of national medical care and tried to integrate it into his Fair Deal program. Truman’s attempts were also unsuccessful, though during his presidency the fight for national medical care became specific to the aged population.

    For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Security_Act_of_1965

    • CR says:

      On the Horizon: The 2015 White House Conference on Aging

      Cecilia Muñoz July 29, 2014 01:25 PM EDT

      Today at the White House, I was delighted to host a roundtable discussion with leaders from across the aging community who came together to discuss the White House Conference on Aging, which will take place in 2015 – the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security.

      Just yesterday, the Medicare Trustees released their annual report finding that, since their report last year, the life of the Medicare Trust Fund has been extended by four additional years to 2030. When this Administration first took office, the Trust Fund was projected to go bankrupt more than a dozen years sooner, in 2017. The Trustees also project that – for the second year in a row – Part B premiums will not increase, allowing seniors to keep more of their Social Security cost-of-living increase.

      Thanks in part to the Affordable Care Act, we have improved the affordability of the program, while at the same time helping Medicare work better for seniors. For example, we are closing the prescription drug coverage gap or “donut hole” to make medications more affordable for Medicare beneficiaries. Just today, we learned that 8.2 million seniors and people with disabilities saved $11.5 billion since 2010 – over $1,000 on average for people hitting the donut hole. Additionally, Medicare now provides coverage without cost-sharing for many preventive benefits to help keep older Americans healthy. The Affordable Care Act also responds to older Americans’ desire to remain independent in their communities by creating incentives for states to provide the services and supports that help people remain at home as they age.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2014/07/29/horizon-2015-white-house-conference-aging

    • CR says:

      The Affordable Care Act and Medicaid Expansion: Giving More People a Chance

      Christen Linke Young, Bess Evans July 30, 2014 11:37 AM EDT

      On July 30, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed both Medicare and Medicaid into law. Over the past 49 years, Medicare has provided comprehensive coverage to millions of seniors and people with disabilities, while Medicaid has provided coverage for millions of the most vulnerable Americans: low-income parents, children, and those with disabilities.

      Because of the Affordable Care Act, states are expanding their Medicaid programs to cover more Americans, and today, Medicaid covers over 66 million Americans.

      Bill Sheshko, a 55-year-old self-employed man from Fair Lawn, New Jersey, experienced the benefits of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion first hand. He’d been without health insurance for years, but with the Affordable Care Act, and because his state decided to expand Medicaid, he finally became eligible for Medicaid.

      A few months ago, Bill began having difficulty breathing and noticed his legs and feet starting to swell. Because of his new coverage, Bill was able to make an appointment with his doctor and was subsequently diagnosed with congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, and high blood sugar. After a few scary days in the hospital, he is now home and working with his doctors to control his conditions with medication and diet. In a letter to the President, Bill wrote about the true meaning of his health coverage: “At least now I have a chance, all because of you.”

      READ MORE: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2014/07/30/affordable-care-act-and-medicaid-expansion-giving-more-people-chance

  3. CR says:

    GOP WRONG WAY

    Remember When Republicans Said Social Security And Medicare Would Destroy Freedom Too?

    APRIL 4, 2014 By SAHIL KAPURP – tpm

    The intense conservative ire for Obamacare may seem like an anomaly in American history. But it’s eerily reminiscent of two other large — and now widely popular — expansions of the safety net: Social Security and Medicare.

    The two programs are now a staple of American political culture. But a backward glance at the political environment during their inception reveals equally fierce, ugly antipathy from conservatives — including screaming warnings that they’d be ruinous to freedom.

    During the 1935 debate over Social Security, Republicans likened it to slavery and dictatorship.

    “Never in the history of the world has any measure been brought here so insidiously designed as to prevent business recovery, to enslave workers and to prevent any possibility of the employers providing work for the people,” said Rep. John Taber (R-NY).

    “The lash of the dictator will be felt,” said Rep. Daniel Reed (R-NY), “and 25 million free American citizens will for the first time submit themselves to a fingerprint test.”

    Rep. James W. Wadsworth (R-NY) cautioned that passage of Social Security would open the door to a government power “so vast, so powerful as to threaten the integrity of our institutions and to pull the pillars of the temple down upon the heads of our descendants.”

    Three decades later, when Medicare was first conceived in the early 1960s, the public was deeply divided, and similar warnings were voiced. Embodying the conservative movement’s sentiments at the time was Ronald Reagan, who taped a recording on behalf of the American Medical Association warning that the program would, quite simply, lead to the destruction of freedom.

    “If Medicare passes into law, the consequences will be dire beyond imagining,” Reagan said. If opponents failed to scuttle it, he warned, “One of these days you and I are going to spend our sunset years telling our children, and our children’s children, what it once was like in America when men were free.”

    Republican presidential nominee Barry Goldwater, in 1964, likened Medicare to free vacations and beer. “Having given our pensioners their medical care in kind,” he said, “why not food baskets, why not public housing accommodations, why not vacation resorts, why not a ration of cigarettes for those who smoke and of beer for those who drink?”

    For more: http://talkingpointsmemo.com/dc/gop-social-security-medicare-freedom

  4. CR says:

    GOP WRONG WAY

    Republicans Have Lost Control of the Impeachment Plot They Hatched

    7/29/14 The Atlantic Wire By Arit John

    The impeachment debate is another example of fringe conservative ideology hurting the establishment’s election chances. House Speaker John Boehner knows that, which is why he said Tuesday that impeachment is a “scam” created by Democrats to motivate their base to vote and donate ahead of the midterm elections, according to the Associated Press. That’s half true. Democrats are fundraising off impeachment, but this conversation was started by Sarah Palin and her fans.

    Democrats are capitalizing off the idea that House Republicans will try to impeach the president, and even fundraising off comments made by White House officials — last week senior adviser Dan Pfeiffer said they take the impeachment threat “very seriously,” and soon after the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee sent this email:

    “UA Today headline: “Obama could be impeached, White House aide says.”

    Between last Thursday, when the House Rules Committee voted to move forward with the lawsuit against President Obama, and Sunday, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee raised $2.1 million, making that the best four day period of the election cycle, according to The Washington Post. That was fueled by impeachment talk — the group sent nine emails mentioning it.

    Byron York at the right-leaning Washington Examiner noted that while there was talk of impeaching President Bush when Democrats won the House in 2006, then Speaker Nancy Pelosi said impeachment was off the table. “But Boehner has not made a far-reaching, definitive statement comparable to declaring impeachment ‘off the table,'” he added. (House Whip Steve Scalise also declined to say impeachment if off the table.)

    That’s because impeachment is popular among conservatives. It’s so popular that Boehner had to explicitly state that his lawsuit “is not about impeachment … This is about his faithfully executing the laws of our country,” as he said last month. A few days later Sarah Palin (who Republicans once chose as their nominee for Vice President of the United States of America) was the first major Republican to directly call for President Obama’s impeachment earlier this month. All the DCCC emails in the world can’t change that fact.

    And a recent CNN poll found that 57 percent of Republicans and 56 percent of conservatives support impeachment. The problem is, while the GOP’s base supports impeachment, the general public — aka moderate and independent voters —doesn’t

    For more: http://news.yahoo.com/republicans-lost-control-impeachment-plot-hatched-175655572.html

  5. CR says:

    Calling Kansas City

    Published on Jul 29, 2014

    Press Secretary, and Kansas City native, Josh Earnest places calls to hardworking Americans in Kansas City who wrote to the President and invites them to dinner with President Obama during his trip to America’s heartland.

    • CR says:

      Obama dines with 4 letter writers in Kansas City as clock ticks toward congressional break

      July 29, 2014 07:44 PM Nedra Pickler / The Associated Press

      KANSAS CITY, Mo. – President Barack Obama feasted on barbecue Tuesday with four people who wrote him letters in a trip to highlight the struggles of working families in American’s heartland, as the clock ticked on pressing issues before Congress goes on summer break.

      Obama’s dinner at Arthur Bryant’s, an unpretentious Kansas City self-serve barbecue joint, comes roughly 48 hours before Congress is set to go on a five-week break. He planned to criticize Congress for its inaction in a speech Wednesday at the historic Uptown Theater, the latest in a series of trips to spread the message in the midterm election year.

      Before lawmakers leave town, the White House is pressing lawmakers to approve an overhaul of the Veterans Affairs health care system and funding to deal with an influx of children streaming in across the southern border. Obama aides said the president planned to criticize House Republicans for using their time working on a potential lawsuit over executive action he’s taken and suggest instead they should work on closing corporate tax loopholes.

      – See more at: http://www.coastreporter.net/obama-dines-with-4-letter-writers-in-kansas-city-as-clock-ticks-toward-congressional-break-1.1267008

    • CR says:

      Raw Video: The President visits Main Street in Parkville, MO

      Published on Jul 31, 2014

      During a trip to Kansas City, Missouri, President Obama took a walk down Main Street — talking with residents and visiting some “mom and pop” shops along the way.

  6. Kat 4 Obama says:

    Good and HOPEful Tuesday evening, CR and all friends.

    >^..^<

  7. CR says:


    U.S. economy bounces back in a big way

    07/30/14 08:51 AM By Steve Benen – maddowblog

    https://propresobama.files.wordpress.com/2014/07/us-gdp-4q-2007-2q-20141-e1406727748943.jpg?w=450

    By any measure, the U.S. economy was unusually weak in the first quarter of the year (January through March), though most in the economic, financial, and political sectors were untroubled by the data. Indeed, for most, the winter drop was something of a fluke, caused by unusually harsh weather conditions and an unexpected drop in health spending.

    Still, the first-quarter report made the second-quarter data all the more important. Would the economy bounce back? This morning, we received an answer – and for those rooting for economic success, the results were even better than expected.

    The U.S. economy grew by a 4% annual pace in the second quarter, bouncing back from a revised 2.1% decline in the first three months of the year, according to a preliminary government estimate. Economists polled by MarketWatch predicted GDP would grow by a seasonally adjusted 3.2%. Consumer spending, the main source of economic activity, accelerated to show a solid 2.5% gain after a meager 1.2% rise in the first quarter. […]

    Also adding to U.S. growth was a pickup in construction spending, increased business investment, a bigger buildup in inventories and slightly higher government spending, the Commerce Department said Wednesday.
    Also note, the most recent data showed the first quarter GDP at -2.9%. Today’s report revises that total in a less-awful direction, to -2.1%.

    Nevertheless, today’s report showing 4% growth is terrific and reinforces the perception of an economy picking up speed. Though this is a preliminary figure that will be revised in the coming months, if it holds up, this will be only the third time in the last seven years that GDP growth has reached 4% or greater.

    What’s more, the swing from -2.1% to +4% is easily the largest positive quarter-to-quarter swing since the start of the Great Recession is late 2007.

    For more: http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/us-economy-bounces-back-big-way

  8. CR says:

    ADP Says Companies in U.S. Boosted Payrolls by 218,000

    Jul 30, 2014 5:59 AM PT By Jeanna Smialek – bloomberg

    Companies added 218,000 workers in July, exceeding the average for the year and showing improving demand is bolstering the U.S. job market, a private payrolls report showed today.

    The gain this month followed a 281,000 increase in June that was the strongest since November 2012, according to data from the ADP Research Institute in Roseland, New Jersey. The median forecast in a Bloomberg survey of economists called for a 230,000 advance in July.

    Businesses are limiting dismissals and taking on more workers, spurring consumer confidence and laying the groundwork for a pickup in household spending that accounts for about 70 percent of the economy. A Labor Department report in two days is projected to show private payrolls climbed by 230,000 workers last month.

    “It’s job growth that’s going to fuel further gains for the economy via its benefit to consumer spending, and thus I see pretty good prospects for the second half of the year,” said Russell Price, senior economist at Ameriprise Financial Inc. in Detroit and among the top ADP forecasters in the Bloomberg survey. “The economy rebounded strongly in the second quarter and we’re seeing strong employment growth continue into the third quarter.”

    Gains in consumer purchases and business investment helped the economy rebound more than forecast in the second quarter.

    For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-07-30/adp-says-companies-in-u-s-boosted-payrolls-by-218-000-in-july.html

  9. CR says:

    July 30, 2014

    Remarks by the First Lady Before a Roundtable with Young African Leaders

    The Omni Shoreham Hotel
    Washington, D.C.

    11:41 A.M. EDT

    MRS. OBAMA: I don’t want to do too much talking because I just talked in there. You heard my thoughts. But I’m really interested in hearing from you.

    As I’ve said — as you’ve heard, as Tina has shared with you — we are really focusing on education broadly in the United States, and girls’ education internationally. And this isn’t just something that I care about now in my role as First Lady. This is an issue that we’re going to have to continue to work on until I take my last breath.

    And so that means that you all are going to be carrying a lot of this stuff that we begin over the finish line. And it’s so important to hear your voices and understand directly from you how these issues impact your life, how do you think somebody in my position can utilize my platform and my resources, again, not just in my role as First Lady, but as the years go forward.

    So I really want to hear from you. And as you heard in my speech, I want us to speak as honestly and as openly as possible. Because I think that’s the only way we’re going to begin to chip away at some of these barriers and to really get a better, clear understanding of what the challenges really are if we’re going to solve this problem.

    So with that, I’m going to stop talking. And I understand that a few of you have some specific presentations, but I also want to know that — as the press clears out, which they will — that we can also — because I know you haven’t had an opportunity to talk to us one-on-one; you talked to the President — but if there are any questions that you have, I’d be happy, happy to take some time to talk to you, as well.

    But let me just say I’m so proud of you all. I really am. And we’re really going to need your insight and your focus and your expertise. So be bold, and be brave, and don’t be shy.

    END
    11:45 A.M. EDT

  10. CR says:

    July 30, 2014

    Remarks by the President on the Economy — Kansas, City, MO

    Uptown Theater
    Kansas City, Missouri

    11:06 A.M. CDT

    THE PRESIDENT: Hello, Kansas City! (Applause.) Well, it is good to be back in Kansas City, back in the Midwest. (Applause.) And I have to say, I love these old theaters. I mean, they are unbelievable. This is just gorgeous.

    It is good to see Governor Jay Nixon here today. (Applause.) Congressman Emanuel Cleaver is here. (Applause.) Congressman Lacy Clay is here. (Applause.) Mayor Sly James is here. (Applause.) And you’re here! All of you are here. (Applause.)

    Now, if you have a seat, feel free to sit down, because I don’t want everybody starting to fall out. (Laughter.) If you don’t have a seat, don’t sit down. But bend your knees a little bit.

    It’s always good to spend a little time in Kansas City. Last night, I had a chance to get some barbecue at Arthur Bryant’s. (Applause.) Now, they had run out of coleslaw, which I asked — I said, did you save some coleslaw for me? They said, no, they hadn’t saved any.

    AUDIENCE MEMBER: (Inaudible.)

    THE PRESIDENT: I’m sorry, what are you hollering about?

    AUDIENCE MEMBER: (Inaudible) to God —

    THE PRESIDENT: I believe in God. Thanks for the prayer. Amen. Thank you. (Applause.)

    AUDIENCE: We love you! We love you!

    THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. I just want to be on record, though, because people have been asking me this question. I deal with a lot of tough issues — I am not going to decide who makes the best barbecue in Kansas City. (Laughter.) Bryant’s barbecue was tasty. And Victor is right, I did plow through it pretty good. (Laughter.) But I have not had enough samples to make a definitive judgment, so I’m going to have to try some other barbecue the next time I come in. I have to say, by the way, Victor was not shy about eating either. (Laughter.) So I just want to be clear.

    But I had a chance — I went there for the barbecue, but also I went there because I wanted to have a chance to talk to Victor and three other people from the area who took the time to sit down with me and talk, because they had written letters to me. Some of you may know —

    AUDIENCE MEMBER: I wrote you, too! (Laughter.)

    THE PRESIDENT: Well, you know what, if I had known, I would have had you over for dinner, too. (Laughter.)

    But what happens is, every night I read 10 letters that we receive. We get 40,000 correspondence. And then our correspondence office chooses 10, sort of a sample for me to take a look at. And it gives me a chance to hear directly from the people I serve. And folks tell me their stories — they tell me their worries and their hopes and their hardships, their successes. Some say I’m doing a good job. (Applause.) But other people say, “You’re an idiot.”

    AUDIENCE: No!

    THE PRESIDENT: No, no, I mean, this is how I know that I’m getting a good sample of letters. (Laughter.)

    Last week, a young girl wrote to ask me why aren’t there any women on our currency, and then she gave me like a long list of possible women to put on our dollar bills and quarters and stuff — which I thought was a pretty good idea.

    Now, Victor wrote to me to tell me about his life in Butler, and he told me that he has been unemployed for a while after he and his wife had had their first child. But he refused to quit. He earned his degree, found a full-time job. He now helps folks with disabilities live independently. And he’s just a good-hearted man. (Applause.) And you can tell, really, he’s doing great stuff. And Victor described how he got through some tough times because of his Christian faith and his determination — which are things that government programs and policies can’t replace. You got to have that sense of purpose and perseverance. That has to come from inside; you can’t legislate that.

    But he also said that he was able to afford health insurance because of the Affordable Care Act. (Applause.) And he also said that because of the income-based repayment plan that we had put in place, where you only have to pay 10 percent of your income maximum in repaying your loans each month, that was what allowed him and his family to keep a roof over their heads and support themselves.

    For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/07/30/remarks-president-economy-kansas-city-mo

  11. CR says:

    World Hepatitis Day 2014

    Published on Jul 30, 2014

    U.S. and international leaders gather at the White House to commemorate World Hepatitis Day, discussing the global impact of viral hepatitis and the importance of public health leadership. July 30, 2014.

  12. CR says:

    *******************
    THIS POST IS NOW CLOSED NBLB

    Come on over to my newest post titled: ” STOP Angery Tantrums. START Passing Laws to Help Middleclass ″

    ********************

    To get to the newest post click on “HOME” at the top of the thread

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