Happy Halloween 2014

10/29/2014

PBO WH Halloween

Steve Sack cartoon

Steve Sack cartoon

Tom Toles cartoon

Tom Toles cartoon

 

Don’t be tricked by the GOP candidates!

GOP WRONG WAY

Republicans Are Trying to Make Sure Minorities and Young People Don’t Vote This November

Control of the Senate could hinge on a few crucial court battles over voting rights.

Wed Oct. 8, 2014 6:00 AM EDT By Stephanie Mencimer – motherjones

As candidates across the country are kicking their get-out-the-vote efforts into high gear, many states are feverishly litigating to defend newly implemented voting restrictions that could prevent many voters from casting a ballot. The outcomes of those cases could shape critical races—and even influence which party wins control of the US Senate.

In a way, Barack Obama can be blamed for this. In 2008, his historic campaign inspired record turnout, drawing more people to the polls than the country had seen in 40 years. Almost all of the record increase came from black, Hispanic, and young voters, who tended to vote Democratic. Republican governors and GOP-controlled state legislatures, not surprisingly, saw this as a problem. They responded by throwing up a host of new obstacles to voting that disproportionately affect black, Latino, and low-income voters.

Since the last midterm elections in 2010, 22 states have passed strict new voting restrictions, according to the Brennan Center for Justice. Some of those measures took effect before the 2012 election, as in Florida, where long lines at polling stations apparently deterred at least 200,000 people from voting that year. Nationally, fewer people cast votes in the presidential race in 2012 than in 2004, even though the country saw the number of eligible voters increase by 8 million. In 15 states, this year’s midterms will mark the first federal election with a host of these new voting restrictions in action.

For more: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2014/10/voting-rights-november-voter-suppression-states

.

5 Republican goals if they win the Senate Nov. 4

9/28/14 Associated Press By The Associated Press

Five things Republicans hope to do if they win control of the Senate this fall:

1. Try to pass measures backed by some congressional Democrats but opposed by President Barack Obama. This could include approving the Keystone XL oil pipeline and removing a tax on medical devices. Obama might find it difficult to veto such bipartisan efforts.

2. Highlight party differences on taxes, spending, regulations and other issues. Republicans could force Obama to veto — or Democratic senators to filibuster — GOP initiatives, painting Democrats as obstructionists.

3. Block confirmation of Obama’s judicial and executive nominees who do not satisfy Republicans’ demands.

4. Join the House in launching investigations into politically sensitive areas such as the Internal Revenue Service, environmental regulations and the killing of Americans in Benghazi, Libya, in 2012.

5. Appeal to conservatives by passing bills to repeal Obama’s health care law and achieve other long-frustrated goals. Obama probably would veto such efforts, assuming they survive Democratic filibusters. But GOP lawmakers could argue they’re doing all they can, and voters should elect a Republican president in 2016 to complete the work.

FLOTUS VOTE

Give America a treat

 

Vote for Democrats in 2014

.

 

Polling Place Locator http://pollingplaces.democrats.org


Matthew Shepard & James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act – 5th Anniversary

10/25/2014

Shepard Byrd Hate Crimes Prevention Act

The Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, also known as the Matthew Shepard Act, is an American Act of Congress, passed on October 22, 2009,  and signed into law by President Barack Obama on October 28, 2009, as a rider to the National Defense Authorization Act for 2010 (H.R. 2647). Conceived as a response to the murders of Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr., the measure expands the 1969 United States federal hate-crime law to include crimes motivated by a victim’s actual or perceived gendersexual orientationgender identity, or disability.

The bill also:

  • Removes the prerequisite that the victim be engaging in a federally protected activity, like voting or going to school;
  • Gives federal authorities greater ability to engage in hate crimes investigations that local authorities choose not to pursue;
  • Provides $5 million per year in funding for fiscal years 2010 through 2012 to help state and local agencies pay for investigating and prosecuting hate crimes;
  • Requires the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to track statistics on hate crimes based on gender and gender identity (statistics for the other groups were already tracked).

The Act is the first federal law to extend legal protections to transgender people.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_Shepard_and_James_Byrd,_Jr._Hate_Crimes_Prevention_Act

 .

FBI Contact Information: http://www.fbi.gov/contact-us/

.

Equal_Love
Saturday, October 25, 2014
Attorney General Holder Announces Federal Government to Recognize Same-Sex Married Couples in Six Additional States

In the latest development following the Supreme Court’s decision earlier this month to decline to hear any pending cases regarding same-sex marriage, Attorney General Eric Holder announced Saturday that the federal government will now recognize same-sex married couples in six new states: Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, North Carolina, West Virginia, and Wyoming.

Last week, the Attorney General made a similar announcement with respect to seven other states: Colorado, Indiana, Nevada, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin. Saturday’s announcement adds to that list and brings the total number of states where same-sex couples are recognized by the federal government to 32, plus the District of Columbia.

The Attorney General’s announcement means couples married in these states will now qualify for a range of federal benefits, including those administered by the Social Security Administration and Department of Veterans Affairs.

“With each new state where same-sex marriages are legally recognized, our nation moves closer to achieving of full equality for all Americans,” the Attorney General said. “We are acting as quickly as possible with agencies throughout the government to ensure that same-sex married couples in these states receive the fullest array of benefits allowable under federal law.”

In addition, the Attorney General also announced that the Department of Justice has determined it can legally recognize marriages performed in Indiana and Wisconsin this past June. These marriages were performed immediately after federal district courts ruled that those states’ bans on same-sex marriage are unconstitutional, but subsequent developments created confusion about the status of those marriages. Based on the Attorney General’s announcement, however, those couples married during that period will now have their unions recognized by the federal government.

lgbt_obama_logo-sml.

 White House – LGBT

 LGBT Democrats Facebook

US LGBT Rights Timeline 1903-2014  (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

Forward For Equality_sml


VOTE SMART & VOTE DEMOCRAT 2014

10/23/2014

2014 VOTE DEMOCRATS INTO SENATE 2014 Congressional Elections Vote Every Election

Vote Every Election

Let’s be very clear, while we’re tuning out and staying home on Election Day, other folks are tuning in.  Other folks are taking politics very seriously.  And they’re engaged on every level.  They’re raising money.  They’re making their voices heard –- and their issues known –- from City Hall to Washington, DC.  And I know that in the face of all of that money and influence, it can start to feel like ordinary citizens just can’t get a seat at the table.  And that can make you feel helpless and hopeless.  It can make you feel or think that you’re powerless.

But I’m here today because that’s simply not true.  We are not helpless or hopeless.  Time and again, history has shown us that there is nothing –- nothing -– more powerful than ordinary citizens coming together for a just cause.”

” I’m talking about the tireless, the thankless, relentless work of making change — you know, the phone-calling, letter-writing, door-knocking, meeting-planning kind of work.  That is the real work of democracy –- what happens during those quiet moments between the marches. “

“That is how we carry on that precious legacy we’ve inherited — by recommitting ourselves to that day-to-day, vitally important work that has always paved the way for change in this country.

What does that mean?  That means being informed.  It means following the news, and learning about who’s representing us, and how our governments work.  It means showing up to vote — and not just every four years, but every year in every election.  It means engaging with the folks we elect, following how they vote and how they spend our hard-earned tax dollars.  And if you don’t like what you see, then let them know, or better yet, run for a seat at the table yourself.  “

June 28, 2012 First Lady Michelle Obama at the AME Church Conference

.

“The vote is the most powerful instrument, the most powerful non-violent tool in a democratic society.”

U.S. Representative John Robert Lewis

vote_democrat_sml

voter-protection-hotline

VOTE SMART & VOTE DEMOCRAT 2014

التصويت على 5 نوفمبر

投票于11月4日

Vote sur Novembre 4

Abstimmen am 4. November

הצביעו ב -4 בנובמבר

Vota il 4 novembre

11月4日投票

11 월 4 일 투표

Votação em 4 de novembro

Проголосовать 4 ноября

votar el 4 de noviembre

Bình chọn vào ngày 4 tháng 11

Vote Forward


United Nations Day 2014

10/22/2014

In 1947, the United Nations General Assembly declared 24 October, the anniversary of the Charter of the United Nations, as which “shall be devoted to making known to the peoples of the world the aims and achievements of the United nations and to gaining their support for” its work.

“UN Day is a day on which we resolve to do more.  More to protect those caught up in armed conflict, to fight climate change and avert nuclear catastrophe; more to expand opportunities for women and girls, and to combat injustice and impunity; more to meet the Millennium Development Goals.” Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

For more: http://www.un.org/

.

October 23, 2014 Presidential Proclamation — United Nations Day, 2014

sml LGBT flag

7/8/14 U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon announced that The United Nations now recognizes the gay marriages of all its staffers


National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights – 35th Anniversary

10/13/2014
1979 National March on Washington for Lesbian & Gay Rights

1979 National March on Washington for Lesbian & Gay Rights

The National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights was a large political rally that took place in Washington, D.C. on October 14, 1979. The first such march on Washington, it drew between 75,000 and 125,000 gay men, lesbians, bisexual and transgender people and straight allies to demand equal civil rights and urge the passage of protective civil rights legislation.

History and Planning

The first major attempt at organizing a national gay and lesbian march on Washington occurred Thanksgiving Weekend 1973 in Urbana-ChampaignIllinois. The National Gay Mobilizing Committee for a March on Washington (NGMC), organized by Jeff Graubart, attempted to coordinate a coalition of extant LGBT organizations to plan a March on Washington. Early efforts were met with resistance from local and national LGBT organizations, and plans for a march were ultimately postponed.

The next organization attempt was to occur in Minneapolis the weekend of November 17–19, 1978. A steering committee was created to prepare for the Minneapolis conference, and it identified a primary goal of the march as transforming the gay movement from local to national. However, the committee was dissolved in October 1978 due to internal dissent. Harvey Milk, who had been on the Minneapolis steering committee, took up the reins to continue march organization, and had secured support from local DC groups who had previously dissented before he was assassinated by Dan White. Milk’s assassination served as a catalyst and a touchstone for organizers, who next planned a conference in Philadelphia February 23–25, 1979. One male and one female delegate was invited from known lesbian and gay organizations, and the attendees set forth to address three primary questions. First, whether or not a march should take place. Second, what the organizational structure of the march should be. And third, the platform of the march. An initial debate between marching in 1979 and 1980 sprung up, but 1979 was settled upon as it fell on the ten-year anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. Once these issues were settled and issues of female and minority representation were handled, the conference set forth five demands that would serve as the platform for the march. The participants chose to focus on single-issue politics so as not to dilute the message of a united lesbian and gay community. The final organizational push occurred at a conference at the University of Houston campus July 6–8, 1979.

The National Steering Committee, with mandated gender parity and 25% representation of People of Color, was selected by community meetings throughout the country. Policy/Overview and Administrative Committees were established to guide the work and decisions between Steering Committee meetings. The National Office was set up in New York City with Joyce Hunter and Steven Ault as National Coordinators.

Platform

The Five Demands, as drafted by Joe Smenyak and amended by the conference delegates were as follows:

  • Pass a comprehensive lesbian/gay rights bill in Congress
  • Issue a presidential executive order banning discrimination based on sexual orientation in the federal government, the military, and federally contracted private employment
  • Repeal all anti-lesbian/gay laws
  • End discrimination in lesbian-mother and gay-father custody cases
  • Protect lesbian and gay youth from any laws which are used to discriminate, oppress, and/or harass them in their homes, schools, jobs, and social environments

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_March_on_Washington_for_Lesbian_and_Gay_Rights

.

US LGBT Rights Timeline 1903-2014

ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™

lgbt_obama_logo-sml

 White House – LGBT

 LGBT Democrats Facebook

Forward For Equality_sml


Underground Railroad

10/08/2014
Huntoon-Van Rensalier Underground Railroad Project, Paterson, New Jersey

Huntoon-Van Rensalier Underground Railroad Project, Paterson, New Jersey

The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses used by 19th-century slaves of African descent in the United States to escape to free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause. The term is also applied to the abolitionists, both black and white, free and enslaved, who aided the fugitives. Various other routes led to Mexico or overseas. While an “Underground Railroad” running south toward Florida, then a Spanish possession, existed from the late 17th century until shortly after the American Revolution,  the network now generally known as the Underground Railroad was formed in the early 19th century, and reached its height between 1850 and 1860. One estimate suggests that by 1850, 100,000 slaves had escaped via the “Railroad”.

British North America (present-day Canada), where slavery was prohibited, was a popular destination, as its long border gave many points of access. More than 30,000 people were said to have escaped there via the network during its 20-year peak period, although U.S. Census figures account for only 6,000.Some fugitives’ stories are documented in The Underground Railroad by William Still.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underground_railroad .

.

Aboard the Underground Railroad A National Register Travel Itinerary – nps.gov

The Underground Railroad refers to the effort–sometimes spontaneous, sometimes highly organized–to assist persons held in bondage in North America to escape from slavery. Historic places along the Underground Railroad are testament of African American capabilities. The network provided an opportunity for sympathetic white Americans to play a role in resisting slavery, and brought together, however uneasily at times, men and women of both races to begin to set aside assumptions about the other race and to work together on issues of mutual concern. At the most dramatic level, the Underground Railroad provided stories of guided escapes from the South, rescues of arrested fugitives in the North, complex communication systems, and individual acts of bravery and suffering in the quest for freedom for all.

For more: http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/underground/ .

.

US Minorities Civil Rights Timeline 1863-1963 (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

US Minorities Civil Rights Timeline 1964-2009 (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

Obama_Biden_thumbnail


Triple Evils of POVERTY, RACISM and MILITARISM

10/05/2014
Dr Martin Luther King, Jr accepts the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize

Dr Martin Luther King, Jr accepts the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize

On October 14, 1964, Dr Martin Luther King, Jr delivered his acceptance speech for the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence where he mentioned the triple evils.

TRIPLE EVILS

The Triple Evils of POVERTY, RACISM and MILITARISM are forms of violence that exist in a vicious cycle. They are interrelated, all-inclusive, and stand as barriers to our living in the Beloved Community. When we work to remedy one evil, we affect all evils. To work against the Triple Evils, you must develop a nonviolent frame of mind as described in the “Six Principles of Nonviolence” and use the Kingian model for social action outlined in the “Six Steps for Nonviolent Social Change.” Some contemporary examples of the Triple Evils are listed next to each item:

  • Poverty – unemployment, homelessness, hunger, malnutrition, illiteracy, infant mortality, slums…
  • Racism – prejudice, apartheid, ethnic conflict, anti-Semitism, sexism, colonialism, homophobia, ageism, discrimination against disabled groups, stereotypes…
  • Militarism – war, imperialism, domestic violence, rape, terrorism, human trafficking, media violence, drugs, child abuse, violent crime…

.For more: http://www.thekingcenter.org/king-philosophy<

.

Dr Martin Luther King, Jr’s  acceptance speech for the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize 

. US Honors Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

January 20, 2014 1:45 PM Meredith BuelChris Simkins – VOAnews
 .
The nation’s attention began to focus on the civil rights movement in the mid-1950s when a young black preacher, Martin Luther King, Jr., led the successful drive to desegregate public buses in Montgomery, Ala. King organized non-violent protests against southern segregation, the struggle for black equality and voting rights. On January 20, 2014, Americans pay tribute to King’s efforts.
  .
Televised footage of violence against civil rights demonstrators sparked a wave of sympathetic public opinion. “He taught us that our job was to redeem the soul of America from the triple evils of racism, war and poverty,” said Andrew Young, a civil rights activist who was a close friend of King. By August 1963 the push for equality had grown significantly and 250,000 participated in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.
 .
Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 284 other followers