UN Conference on Climate Change – Paris COP21

2015 UN CCC


France will chair and host the 21st Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP21/CMP11), from 30 November to 11 December 2015. The conference is crucial because the expected outcome is a new international agreement on climate change, applicable to all, to keep global warming below 2°C.


The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) was adopted during the Rio de Janeiro Earth Summit in 1992. This Framework Convention is a universal convention of principle, acknowledging the existence of anthropogenic (human-induced) climate change and giving industrialized countries the major part of responsibility for combating it.

The adoption of the Kyoto Protocol at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 1992 was a milestone in the international negotiations on tackling climate change.
For the first time, binding greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets were set for industrialised countries. The protocol, which entered into force in 2005, was intended to cover the period 2008-2012.

For more: http://www.cop21.gouv.fr/en/learn/what-is-cop21/



President Obama Travel Itinerary

Sunday, November 29th

President Obama departs White House
South Lawn

President Obama departs Joint Base Andrews en route for Paris

President Obama arrives Paris
Paris Orly Airport, Paris, France

President Obama pays his respects to the victims of the Nov. 13 Paris terror attacks
Bataclan Concert Hall, Paris France


Monday, November 30th

President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Chinese President Xi
Paris, France

President Obama and his cabinet officials, US State Secretary Kerry, Interior Secretary Jewell, USDA Secretary Vilsack, Labor Secretary Moniz and EPA Administrator McCarthy, attend meetings at the COP21
Le Bourget, Seine-Saint-Denis, Paris, France

President Obama attends the opening ceremony 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference
Le Bourget, Seine-Saint-Denis, Paris, France

President Obama attends the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference
Le Bourget, Seine-Saint-Denis, Paris, France

President Obama delivers a statement at the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference
Le Bourget, Seine-Saint-Denis, Paris, France

President Obama attends a lunch host by French President Hollande
Le Bourget, Seine-Saint-Denis, Paris, France

President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Indian Prime Minister Modi
Le Bourget, Seine-Saint-Denis, Paris, France

President Obama participates in a Mission Innovation Event with other leaders and the private sector
Le Bourget, Seine-Saint-Denis, Paris, France

President Obama attends a working dinner hosted by French President Hollande
Élysée Palace, Paris, France


Tuesday, December 1st

President Obama convenes a meeting of the island nations leaders of the Seychelles, Kiribati, the Marshall Islands, Papua New Guinea, St. Lucia and Barbados who are most at risk from the threat of climate change.
Paris, France

President Obama holds a press conference
Paris, France

President Obama departs Paris
Paris Orly Airport, Paris, France

President Obama departs Joint Base Andrews en route for White House

President Obama arrives White House
South Lawn



Noveember 30 – December 11, 2015
2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference

Le Bourget, Seine-Saint-Denis, Paris, France


U.S. Center COP-21 Live Stream

Clean Water Act of 1972 – 43rd Anniversary

Clean Water Act

The Clean Water Act

This Act [ voted into law on October 18, 1972 by Congress’ supermajority vote  over riding President Nixon’s (R) veto]  , is the principle law governing pollution control and water quality of the Nation’s waterways. The objective of this Act is to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Nation’s waters (33 U.S.C. 1251). The Act has been amended numerous times and given a number of titles and codification. It was originally enacted as the Water Pollution Control Act in 1948 (P.L. 80-845), and was completely revised by the 1972 amendments, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments (P.L. 92-500). The 1972 amendments gave the Act its current form, and established a national goal that all waters of the U.S. should be fishable and swimmable. The goal was to be achieved by eliminating all pollutant discharges into waters of the U.S. by 1985 with an interim goal of making the waters safe for fish, shellfish, wildlife and people by July 1, 1983 (86 Stat. 816, 33 U.S.C. 1251) . The 1977 amendments (the Clean Water Act of 1977 (P.L. 95-217)) gave the Act its current title. Additional amendments were enacted in 1981 (Municipal Wastewater Treatment Construction Grants Amendments (P.L. 97-117)) and in 1987 (Water Quality Act of 1987 (P.L. 100-4).  The Act regulates discharges to waters of the United States through permits issued under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting program. The Water Quality Protection Division, issues the NPDES permits and the Water Enforcement Branch assures that all discharges comply with the NPDES permits.

 Learn more: http://www.epa.gov/region6/6en/w/cwa.htm

Clean Water Legislative History

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clean_water_act

.Water Pollution


National Historic Landmarks Program – 55th Anniversary

National Historic Landmarks Program

National Historic Landmarks (NHLs) are historic properties that illustrate the heritage of the United States. Today, just over 2,500 historic places bear this national distinction. NHLs come in many forms: historic buildings, sites, structures, objects, and districts. Each NHL represents an outstanding aspect of American history and culture. The program was formally inaugurated with a series of listings on October 9, 1960.

What are National Historic Landmarks?

National Historic Landmarks (NHLs) are historic places that possess exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United States.  The National Park Service’s National Historic Landmarks Program oversees the designation of such sites.  There are just over 2,500 National Historic Landmarks.  All NHLs are also listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

NHLs come in many forms: buildings, sites, structures, objects, and districts.  A historic site may be important enough to receive designation as an NHL if it:

  • is the location with the strongest association with a turning point or significant event in American history.
  • is the best location to tell the story of an individual who played a significant role in the history of the United States.
  • is an exceptional representation of a particular building or engineering method, technique, or building type in the country.
  • provides the potential to yield new and innovative information about the past through archeology.

Most NHLs are owned by private individuals, universities, non-profit organizations, corporations, tribal entities, or local and state governments.  The Federal government owns fewer than 400 NHLs (16%).  The laws that govern property rights still apply to designated Landmarks.  Designation of a property as a National Historic Landmark does not give ownership of the property to the Federal government or the National Park Service.

For more: http://www.nps.gov/nhl/


Learn about:

 For more: http://www.nps.gov/nhl/index.htm


Latest NHL News:

  • On August 4, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis announced the designation of four new National Historic Landmarks: the George Washington Masonic National Memorial (Alexandria, Virginia), Red Rocks Park and Mount Morrison Civilian Conservation Corps Camp (Jefferson County, Colorado), First Peoples Buffalo Jump (Cascade County, Montana), and Lafayette Park (Detroit, Michigan). To learn more about these NHLs, please consult the nominations on our Fall 2014 Landmarks Committee meeting page.
  • On June 19, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced the designation of the newest National Historic Landmark, the Henry Gerber House in Chicago, Illinois, in recognition of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month. Henry Gerber is the founder of the Society for Human Rights, the first chartered organization in the United States dedicated to the advocacy of homosexuals, marking a turning point in LGBTQ history. The Henry Gerber House, where the organization was founded and headquartered in 1924, is the second National Historic Landmark designated for its association with LGBTQ history, and the first to be identified and designated through the LGBTQ Heritage Initiative. To learn more about this NHL, please consult the nomination on our Fall 2014 Landmarks Committee meeting page.
  • On April 15, Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell announced the designation of 5 new National Historic Landmarks: the Brookline Reservoir of the Cochituate Aqueduct (Brookline, Massachusetts), the California Powder Works Bridge (Santa Cruz County, California), Lake Hotel (Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming), the McGregor Memorial Conference Center (Detroit, Michigan), and Samara (West Lafayette, Indiana).


Alaska GLACIER Conference

Alaska GLACIER Conference

The Conference on Global Leadership in the Arctic: Cooperation, Innovation, Engagement and Resilience, or GLACIER, will highlight international and domestic priorities in the Arctic. At the direction of the U.S. Arctic Executive Steering Committee, the Department of State is developing the agenda for GLACIER in close coordination with the White House, and Departments and Agencies of the United States Government with Arctic responsibilities.

This global leadership focus on the Arctic is intended to generate momentum and expedite progress in addressing some of the most pressing issues facing the region. This conference will bring together Foreign Ministers of Arctic nations and key non-Arctic states with scientists, policymakers, and stakeholders from Alaska and the Arctic. Representatives of Arctic indigenous peoples will be invited to attend and encouraged to participate. GLACIER will discuss individual and collective action to address climate change in the Arctic; raise the visibility of climate impacts in the Arctic as a harbinger for the world, and the Arctic’s unique role in global climate change; identify ways that Arctic innovators are responding to these critical challenges; and share opportunities to prepare and respond to other issues in the changing Arctic.

GLACIER will take place during the U.S. Chairmanship of the Arctic Council, but is not an Arctic Council sponsored event. GLACIER is also not directly related to the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (otherwise known as COP-21) taking place in late 2015. This conference will, however, help to focus attention on the challenges and opportunities that the Arctic Council intends to address and highlight how a region vulnerable to climate change is experiencing and responding to these impacts, helping to drive political will for ambitious action at COP-21.

The full-day event will begin with an opening plenary session, after which attendees may participate in one of three tracks. Foreign Ministers will participate in sessions focused on changes in the Arctic and global implications of those changes, climate resilience and adaptation planning, and strengthening coordination on Arctic issues.

For more:  http://www.state.gov/e/oes/glacier/index.htm

WH 2015 Alaska GLACIER Conference

Camai President Obama

Monday, August 31, 2015

President Obama participates in a roundtable with Alaska Natives
Dena’ina Center, Anchorage, Alaska

President Barack Obama announces a “secretarial order” that has officially restored the Koyukon Athabascan name of Denali to the tallest mountain in North America, previously known as Mt. McKinley
Dena’ina Center, Anchorage, Alaska

President Obama addresses the GLACIER Conference
Dena’ina Center, Anchorage, Alaska

President Obama meets with foreign ministers, scientists, policymakers, and stakeholders from Alaska and the Arctic region at the GLACIER Conference
Dena’ina Center, Anchorage, Alaska


Tuesday, September 1, 2015

President Obama hikes to the Exit Glacier
Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska

President Obama participates in a boat tour of Kenai Fjords National Park
Kenai Peninsula Borough, Alaska

President Obama announces New Investments to Enhance Safety and Security in the Changing Arctic

President Obama Announces New Investments to Combat Climate Change and Assist Remote Alaskan Communities


Wednesday, September 2, 2015

President Obama tours the Kotzebue Shore Avenue Project
Kanakanak Beach, Dillingham, Alaska

President Obama meets with local fisherman and families
Kanakanak Beach, Dillingham, Alaska

President Obama visits a local business
N&N Market, Dillingham, Alaska

President Obama attends a cultural performance
Dillingham Middle School, Dillingham, Alaska

President Obama delivers remarks on Energy Policy
Kotzebue HIgh School, Kotzebue, Alaska



2015 National Clean Energy Summit 8.0

Natl Clean Energy Summit - lrg

The eighth annual National Clean Energy Summit will bring together clean energy visionaries and leaders, public officials, business executives, energy policy experts, entrepreneurs, investors, citizens, and students, to discuss empowering Americans to develop our massive clean energy supplies, secure greater energy independence, and create jobs. The day-long clean energy summit is cosponsored by US Senator Harry Reid, the Center for American Progress, the Clean Energy Project, MGM Resorts International, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.


Ripple Effect: Game-Changing Clean Energy Investments

Moderator: Dan Klaich, Chancellor of the Nevada System of Higher Education

Speakers: Jamie Evans, Managing Director and Head of U.S. Eco Solutions, Panasonic
Diarmuid O’Connell, Vice President of Business Development at Tesla Motors

Description: The “Ripple Effect: Game Changing Clean Energy Investments” brings the next generation of clean energy development into focus with an in-depth look at large, trend-setting investments in clean energy. A recent example of those game-changing investments is the “Gigafactory,”  the Nevada-based lithium ion battery plant currently being constructed by Tesla and Panasonic. The discussion will focus on how significant clean energy investments have dramatic positive impacts on the surrounding communities, including job creation, fostering entrepreneurship and building economic diversity. The panel will also provide an opportunity to discuss cooperation between the public and private sectors to prepare the workforce to match the needs of a growing clean energy economy, with the gigafactory highlighted as one of many models of success.

 Energy in the Information Age

Speakers: Dr. Ellen Williams, Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E)
Thomas Voss, Chairman of Smart Wires
Amy Ericson, Country President for the United States at Alstom
Susan Kennedy, CEO and BOard Member of Advanced Microgrid Solutions

Description: The “Energy in Information Age” panel will explore solutions to revitalize the nation’s outdated power grid. As homes and appliances become more connected to the internet and people generate more of their own clean electricity, the country will need to invest in innovative solutions to ensure the grid infrastructure is serving the needs of Americans. During “Energy in the Information Age,” the panelists will lead a thrilling conversation about how companies are inventing and deploying solutions that will ensure the grid communicates better with consumers and their homes, allowing them to save energy and deploy cleaner energy.

Energy in American Life

Moderator: Neera Tanden, President of the Center for American Progress

Speakers:  Bill Ritter, Former Governor of Colorado
Antonio Villaraigosa, Former Mayor of Los Angeles
Nancy Pfund, Founder and Managing Partner of DBL Investors
Geisha Williams, President of Electric Operations at Pacific Gas and Electric Company

Description: The “Energy in American Life” panel features a timely discussion about the savings and opportunities that clean energy and efficiency bring to families and businesses today. Panelists will discuss how Americans are demanding cleaner energy, less pollution and solutions to climate change, and the ways in which communities are adopting those solutions today. The conversation will also focus on how state and federal clean energy investments and policies will help states implement President Barack Obama’s Clean Power Plan, which aims to maintain an affordable, reliable energy system, while cutting pollution and protecting the nation’s health and environment now and for future generations.

For more: http://www.cleanenergysummit.org



August 24, 2015
National Clean Energy Summit 8.0: Powering Progress
Las Vegas, Nevada
Keynote Speaker: President Barack Obama



U.S. National Heritage Areas

Preserve Natl Heritage Areas

National Heritage Areas Map
National Heritage Areas Map

A National Heritage Area is a site designated by United States and intended to encourage historic preservation of the area and an appreciation of the history and heritage of the site. There are currently 49 National Heritage Areas, some of which use variations of the title, such as National Heritage Corridor.

National Heritage Areas (NHA) are not National Park Service units or federally owned or managed land. National Heritage Areas are administered by state governments or non-profit organizations or other private corporations. The National Park Service provides an advisory role and limited technical, planning and financial assistance.

NHAs are created by Congress. Each area has its own authorizing legislation and a set of unique resources and goals. Areas considered for designation must have specific elements. First, the landscape must be a nationally unique natural, cultural, historic, or scenic resource. Second, when the related sites are linked, they must tell a unique story about the U.S.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Heritage_Area


What are National Heritage Areas?

National Heritage Areas (NHAs) are designated by Congress as places where natural, cultural, and historic resources combine to form a cohesive, nationally important landscape. Through their resources,NHAs tell nationally important stories that celebrate our nation’s diverse heritage. NHAs are lived-in landscapes. Consequently, NHA entities collaborate with communities to determine how to make heritage relevant to local interests and needs.

NHAs are a grassroots, community-driven approach to heritage conservation and economic development. Through public-private partnerships, NHA entities support historic preservation, natural resource conservation, recreation, heritage tourism, and educational projects. Leveraging funds and long-term support for projects, NHA partnerships foster pride of place and an enduring stewardship ethic.

The National Heritage Area Program

NHAs further the mission of the National Park Service (NPS) by fostering community stewardship of our nation’s heritage. The NHA program, which currently includes 49 heritage areas, is administered by NPS coordinators in Washington DC and six regional offices – Anchorage, Oakland, Denver, Omaha, Philadelphia, and Atlanta – as well as park unit staff.

NHAs are not national park units. Rather, NPS partners with, provides technical assistance, and distributes matching federal funds from Congress to NHA entities. NPS does not assume ownership of land inside heritage areas or impose land use controls.


How do National Heritage Areas work?

National Heritage Areas (NHA) expand on traditional approaches to resource stewardship by supporting large-scale, community driven initiatives that connect local citizens to the preservation and planning process. 

What is the role of the National Park Service?

The National Park Service (NPS) provides technical, planning and limited financial assistance to National Heritage Areas. The NPS is a partner and advisor, leaving decision-making authority in the hands of local people and organizations. 

The National heritage Areas staff at NPS headquarters are available to help answer any questions about the program. 

How is it different from a National Park?

A National Heritage Area is not a unit of the National Park Service, nor is any land owned or managed by the NPS. National Park Service involvement is always advisory in nature.

For more: http://www.nps.gov/heritageareas/FAQ/

Heritage & Historic Preservation – NPS Facebook
Heritage & Historic Preservation – NPS Twitter



Clean Power Plan – Nation’s First-Ever Carbon Pollution Standards for Existing Power Plants

Clean Power Plan

On August 3, 2015, President Obama and EPA announced the Clean Power Plan – a historic and important step in reducing carbon pollution from power plants that takes real action on climate change. Shaped by years of unprecedented outreach and public engagement, the final Clean Power Plan is fair, flexible and designed to strengthen the fast-growing trend toward cleaner and lower-polluting American energy. With strong but achievable standards for power plants, and customized goals for states to cut the carbon pollution that is driving climate change, the Clean Power Plan provides national consistency, accountability and a level playing field while reflecting each state’s energy mix. It also shows the world that the United States is committed to leading global efforts to address climate change.


  • The Clean Power Plan will reduce carbon pollution from power plants, the nation’s largest source, while maintaining energy reliability and affordability. Also on August 3, EPA issued final Carbon Pollution Standards for new, modified, and reconstructed power plants, and proposed a Federal Plan and model rule to assist states in implementing the Clean Power Plan.
  • These are the first-ever national standards that address carbon pollution from power plants.
  • The Clean Power Plan cuts significant amounts of power plant carbon pollution and the pollutants that cause the soot and smog that harm health, while advancing clean energy innovation, development and deployment, and laying the foundation for the long-term strategy needed to tackle the threat of climate change. By providing states and utilities ample flexibility and the time needed to achieve these pollution cuts, the Clean Power Plan offers the power sector the ability to optimize pollution reductions while maintaining a reliable and affordable supply of electricity for ratepayers and businesses.
  • Fossil fuels will continue to be a critical component of America’s energy future. The Clean Power Plan simply makes sure that fossil fuel-fired power plants will operate more cleanly and efficiently, while expanding the capacity for zero- and low-emitting power sources.

The final rule is the result of unprecedented outreach to states, tribes, utilities, stakeholders and the public, including more than 4.3 million comments EPA received on the proposed rule. The final Clean Power Plan reflects that input, and gives states and utilities time to preserve ample, reliable and affordable power for all Americans.


  • In 2009, EPA determined that greenhouse gas pollution threatens Americans’ health and welfare by leading to long-lasting changes in our climate that can have a range of negative effects on human health and the environment. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the most prevalent greenhouse gas pollutant, accounting for nearly three-quarters of global greenhouse gas emissions and 82 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Climate change is one of the greatest environmental and public health challenges we face. Climate impacts affect all Americans’ lives – from stronger storms to longer droughts and increased insurance premiums, food prices and allergy seasons.
  • 2014 was the hottest year in re
  • corded history, and 14 of the 15 warmest years on record have all occurred in the first 15 years of this century. Recorded temperatures in the first half of 2015 were also warmer than normal.
  • Overwhelmingly, the best scientists in the world, relying on troves of data and millions of measurements collected over the course of decades on land, in air and water, at sea and from space, are telling us that our activities are causing climate change.
  • The most vulnerable among us – including children, older adults, people with heart or lung disease and people living in poverty – may be most at risk from the impacts of climate change.
  • Fossil fuel-fired power plants are by far the largest source of U.S. CO2 emissions, making up 31 percent of U.S. total greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Taking action now is critical. Reducing CO2 emissions from power plants, and driving investment in clean energy technologies strategies that do so, is an essential step in lessening the impacts of climate change and providing a more certain future for our health, our environment, and future generations.

For more: epa.gov/cleanpowerplan


6 Things Every American Should Know About the Clean Power Plan
8/3/15 By EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy
Today, President Obama will unveil the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Clean Power Plan—a historic step to cut the carbon pollution driving climate change. Here are six key things every American should know:


Carbon pollution from power plants is our nation’s biggest driver of climate change—and it threatens what matters most – the health of our kids, the safety of our neighborhoods, and the ability of Americans to earn a living. The Clean Power Plan sets common sense, achievable state-by-state goals to cut carbon pollution from power plants across the country. Building on proven local and state efforts, the Plan puts our nation on track to cut carbon pollution from the power sector 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030, all while keeping energy reliable and affordable.


The transition to clean energy is happening even faster than we expected—and that’s a good thing. It means carbon and air pollution are already decreasing, improving public health each and every year. The Clean Power Plan accelerates this momentum, putting us on pace to cut this dangerous pollution to historically low levels. Our transition to cleaner energy will better protect Americans from other kinds of harmful air pollution, too. By 2030, we’ll see major reductions of pollutants that can create dangerous soot and smog, translating to significant health benefits for the American people. In 2030, we’ll avoid up to 3,600 fewer premature deaths; 90,000 fewer asthma attacks in children; 1,700 fewer hospital admissions; and avoid 300,000 missed days of school and work. The Clean Power Plan is a historic step forward to give our kids and grandkids the cleaner, safer future they deserve.


The Clean Power Plan sets uniform carbon pollution standards for power plants across the country—but sets individual state goals based on states’ current energy mix and where they have opportunities to cut pollution. States then customize plans to meet their goals in ways that make sense for their communities, businesses, and utilities. States can run their more efficient plants more often, switch to cleaner fuels, use more renewable energy, and take advantage of emissions trading and energy efficiency options.

Because states requested it, EPA is also proposing a model rule states can adopt right away–one that’s cost-effective, guarantees they meet EPA’s requirements, and will let their power plants use interstate trading right away. But states don’t have to use our plan—they can cut carbon pollution in whatever way makes the most sense for them.

The uniform national rates in the Clean Power Plan are reasonable and achievable, because no plant has to meet them alone or all at once. Instead, they have to meet them as part of the grid and over time. In short, the Clean Power Plan puts states in the driver’s seat.


The Clean Power Plan reflects unprecedented input from the American people, including 4.3 million comments on the draft plan and input from hundreds of meetings with states, utilities, communities, and others. When folks raised questions about equity and fairness, we listened. That’s why EPA is setting uniform standards to make sure similar plants are treated the same across the country.

When states and utilities expressed concern about how fast states would need to cut emissions under the draft Plan, we listened. That’s why the Clean Power Plan extends the timeframe for mandatory emissions reductions to begin by two years, until 2022, so utilities will have time to make the upgrades and investments they need to.

But to encourage states to stay ahead of the curve and not delay planned investments, or delay starting programs that need time to pay off, we’re creating a Clean Energy Incentive Program to help states transition to clean energy faster.

It’s a voluntary matching fund program states can use to encourage early investment in wind and solar power projects, as well as energy efficiency projects in low-income communities. Thanks to the valuable input we heard from the public, the final rule is even more fair and more flexible, while cutting more pollution.


With the Clean Power Plan, America is leading by example—showing the world that climate action is an incredible economic opportunity. By 2030, the net public health and climate-related benefits from the Clean Power Plan are estimated to be worth $45 billion every year. And, by design, the Clean Power Plan is projected to cut the average American’s monthly electricity bill by 7% in 2030. We’ll get these savings by cutting energy waste and beefing up energy efficiency across the board—steps that make sense for our health, our future, and our wallets.


Today, the U.S. is generating three times more wind energy and 20 times more solar power than when President Obama took office. And the solar industry is adding jobs 10 times faster than the rest of the economy. For the first time in nearly three decades, we’re importing less foreign oil than we’re producing domestically—and using less overall.

Our country’s clean energy transition is happening faster than anyone anticipated—even as of last year when we proposed this rule. The accelerating trend toward clean power, and the growing success of energy efficiency efforts, mean carbon emissions are already going down, and the pace is picking up. The Clean Power Plan will secure and accelerate these trends, building momentum for a cleaner energy future.

Climate change is a global problem that demands a global solution. With the Clean Power Plan, we’re putting America in a position to lead. Since the Plan was proposed last year, the U.S., China and Brazil – three of the world’s largest economies – have announced commitments to significantly reduce carbon pollution. We’re confident other nations will come to the table ready to reach an international climate agreement in Paris later this year.


The Clean Power Plan: Myths and Facts

Tuesday, August 11, 2015
Environmental Protection Agency  Administrator Gina McCarthy
discusses the Clean Power Plan
Resources For The Future


#ActOnClimate    #CleanPowerPlan