Four Freedoms – 75th Anniversary

Four Freedoms - FDR_Memorial_wall

The Four Freedoms were goals articulated by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) on January 6, 1941. In an address known as the Four Freedoms speech (technically the 1941 State of the Union address), he proposed four fundamental freedoms that people “everywhere in the world” ought to enjoy:

  1. Freedom of speech
  2. Freedom of worship
  3. Freedom from want
  4. Freedom from fear

Roosevelt delivered his speech 11 months before the United States declared war on Japan, December 8, 1941. The State of the Union speech before Congress was largely about the national security of the United States and the threat to other democracies from world war that was being waged across the continents in the eastern hemisphere. In the speech, he made a break with the tradition of United States non-interventionism that had long been held in the United States. He outlined the U.S. role in helping allies already engaged in warfare.

In that context, he summarized the values of democracy behind the bipartisan consensus on international involvement that existed at the time. A famous quote from the speech prefaces those values: “As men do not live by bread alone, they do not fight by armaments alone.” In the second half of the speech, he lists the benefits of democracy, which includes economic opportunity, employment, social security, and the promise of “adequate health care”. The first two freedoms, of speech and religion, are protected by the First Amendment in the United States Constitution. His inclusion of the latter two freedoms went beyond the traditional Constitutional values protected by the U.S. Bill of Rights. Roosevelt endorsed a broader human right to economic security and anticipated what would become known decades later as the “human security” paradigm in social science and economic development. He also included the “freedom from fear” against national aggression before the idea of a United Nations for this protection was envisioned or discussed by world leaders and allied nations.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_freedoms

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“In the future days, which we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms.

The first is freedom of speech and expression — everywhere in the world.

The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way — everywhere in the world.

The third is freedom from want — which, translated into world terms, means economic understandings which will secure to every nation a healthy peacetime life for its inhabitants — everywhere in the world.

The fourth is freedom from fear — which, translated into world terms, means a world-wide reduction of armaments to such a point and in such a thorough fashion that no nation will be in a position to commit an act of physical aggression against any neighbor– anywhere in the world.”

Excerpts from President Franklin Delano Roosevelt 1/20/1941

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International Human Rights Day 2015
John Kerry
Secretary of StateWashington, DC
December 10, 2015

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was forged in the aftermath of World War II to protect freedom and prevent future atrocities. As we commemorate it today, we recall President Franklin Roosevelt’s 1941 Four Freedoms address, which inspired the Universal Declaration, and which the United Nations selected as this year’s theme for International Human Rights Day.

The “four freedoms” – of speech and religion, from want and fear – are as relevant and compelling today as they were when Roosevelt spoke almost three quarters of a century ago.

For more: http://www.state.gov/secretary/remarks/2015/12/250541.htm

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Kwanzaa 2015

FILE - The seven tenets of Kwanzaa are unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity and faith.
The seven tenets of Kwanzaa are unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity and faith. – VOAnews

Kwanzaa

(Excerpts)

Kwanzaa (/ˈkwɑːn.zə/) is a week-long celebration held in the United States and in other nations of the Western African diaspora in the Americas. The celebration honors African heritage in African-American culture, and is observed from December 26 to January 1, culminating in a feast and gift-giving. Kwanzaa has seven core principles (Nguzo Saba).

Each of the seven days of Kwanzaa is dedicated to one of the following principles, as follows:

  • Umoja (Unity): To strive for and to maintain unity in the family, community, nation, and race.
  • Kujichagulia (Self-Determination): To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves.
  • Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility): To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers’ and sisters’ problems our problems, and to solve them together.
  • Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics): To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together.
  • Nia (Purpose): To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.
  • Kuumba (Creativity): To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.
  • Imani (Faith): To believe with all our hearts in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

For the entire article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kwanzaa

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December 26, 2015

Statement by the President and the First Lady on Kwanzaa

Michelle and I extend our warmest wishes to families across the country celebrating Kwanzaa this holiday season. Today begins a week-long celebration of African-American heritage and culture through family and community festivities. Kwanzaa’s seven principles – unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity and faith – are also shared values that bind us as Americans. And in the spirit of the season, we reflect on the blessings of the past year and commit to building a brighter future for all our children. As families, friends, and neighbors come together today to light the Kinara, our family sends our best wishes for a happy and healthy new year.

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International Human Rights Day 2015

Four Freedoms - FDR_Memorial_wall

International Human Rights Day 2015
John Kerry
Secretary of StateWashington, DC
December 10, 2015

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was forged in the aftermath of World War II to protect freedom and prevent future atrocities. As we commemorate it today, we recall President Franklin Roosevelt’s 1941 Four Freedoms address, which inspired the Universal Declaration, and which the United Nations selected as this year’s theme for International Human Rights Day.

The “four freedoms” – of speech and religion, from want and fear – are as relevant and compelling today as they were when Roosevelt spoke almost three quarters of a century ago.

For more: http://www.state.gov/secretary/remarks/2015/12/250541.htm

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Human Rights Day

Human Rights Day is observed every year on 10 December. It commemorates the day on which, in 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In 1950, the Assembly passed resolution 423 (V), inviting all States and interested organizations to observe 10 December of each year as Human Rights Day.

This year’s Human Rights Day is devoted to the launch of a year-long campaign for the 50t hanniversary of the two International Covenants on Human Rights: the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, which were adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 16 December 1966.

The two Covenants, together with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, form the International Bill of Human Rights, setting out the civil, political, cultural, economic, and social rights that are the birth right of all human beings.

“Our Rights. Our Freedoms. Always.” aims to promote and raise awareness of the two Covenants on their 50th anniversary. The year-long campaign revolves around the theme of rights and freedoms — freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear — which underpin the International Bill of Human Rights are as relevant today as they were when the Covenants were adopted 50 years ago.

For more: http://www.un.org/en/events/humanrightsday/

US Flag Freedom Religion

The International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (Public Law 105–292, as amended by Public Law 106–55, Public Law 106–113, Public Law 107–228, Public Law 108–332, and Public Law 108–458) was passed to promote religious freedom as a foreign policy of the United States, and to advocate on the behalf of the individuals viewed as persecuted in foreign countries on the account of religion. The Act was signed into law by President Bill Clinton on October 27, 1998. Three cooperative entities have been maintained by this act to monitor religious persecution.

  1. An Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom within the Department of State,
  2. bipartisan United States Commission on International Religious Freedom, and
  3. Special Adviser on International Religious Freedom within the National Security Council.

While the original bill imposed mandatory sanctions on the countries supporting religious persecution, the amended act offers the president a waiverprovision if he feels that it would further the goal of the bill or promote the interests of U.S. national security not to impose measures on a designated country.

For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Religious_Freedom_Act_of_1998

#FreedomOfReligion

#HumanRightsDay

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Pres. Obama & First Lady Michelle welcomes His Holiness Pope Francis

First Lady Michelle, His Holiness Pope Francis and Pres Obama
First Lady Michelle, His Holiness Pope Francis and Pres Obama

March 26, 2015

Statement by the Press Secretary on the Visit of His Holiness Pope Francis

The President and the First Lady will welcome His Holiness Pope Francis to the White House on Wednesday, September 23. During the visit, the President and the Pope will continue the dialogue, which they began during the President’s visit to the Vatican in March 2014, on their shared values and commitments on a wide range of issues, including caring for the marginalized and the poor; advancing economic opportunity for all; serving as good stewards of the environment; protecting religious minorities and promoting religious freedom around the world; and welcoming and integrating immigrants and refugees into our communities. The President looks forward to continuing this conversation with the Holy Father during his first visit to the United States as Pope.

For more: http://go.wh.gov/PopeVisit

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June 18, 2015

Statement by the President on Pope Francis’s Encyclical

I welcome His Holiness Pope Francis’s encyclical, and deeply admire the Pope’s decision to make the case – clearly, powerfully, and with the full moral authority of his position – for action on global climate change.

As Pope Francis so eloquently stated this morning, we have a profound responsibility to protect our children, and our children’s children, from the damaging impacts of climate change. I believe the United States must be a leader in this effort, which is why I am committed to taking bold actions at home and abroad to cut carbon pollution, to increase clean energy and energy efficiency, to build resilience in vulnerable communities, and to encourage responsible stewardship of our natural resources. We must also protect the world’s poor, who have done the least to contribute to this looming crisis and stand to lose the most if we fail to avert it.

I look forward to discussing these issues with Pope Francis when he visits the White House in September. And as we prepare for global climate negotiations in Paris this December, it is my hope that all world leaders–and all God’s children–will reflect on Pope Francis’s call to come together to care for our common home.

For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/06/18/statement-president-pope-francis’s-encyclical

Pope Francis on politics

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His Holiness Pope Francis in the USA

September 22, 2015

President Obama, Vice President Biden, First Lady Michelle Obama, and Dr Biden welcomes His Holiness Pope Francis, Joint Base Andrews, Washington DC

September 23, 2015

His Holiness Pope Francis speaks with the U.S. Bishops, St. Matthew’s Cathedral Washington, D.C.

President Obama, Vice President Biden, First Lady Michelle Obama, and Dr Biden welcomes His Holiness Pope Francis to the White House, South Lawn

 President Obama and His Holiness Pope Francis holds a bilateral meeting, Rose Garden, Washington, DC

 President Obama and His Holiness Pope Francis tour the Ellipse and parts of the National Mall, Washington, DC

 His Holiness Pope Francis holds mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, DC

September 24, 2015

His Holiness Pope Francis addresses a joint session of Congress, U.S. Capitol, Washington, DC

 His Holiness Pope Francis holds Midday Prayer with U.S. bishops, Saint Matthew’s Cathedral, Washington, DC

 His Holiness Pope Francis visits St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in D.C. and Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington, Washington, DC

His Holiness Pope Francis has lunch with  200 people who are homeless or living in poverty, St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, Washington DC

 His Holiness Pope Francis visits St. Patrick’s Catholic Church  and Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington, Washington, DC

 His Holiness Pope Francis holds evening prayer at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, New York, NY

September 25, 2015

His Holiness Pope Francis addresses the United Nations, New York, NY

His Holiness Pope Francis attends an interfaith service at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, New York City, NY

His Holiness Pope Francis visits Our Lady Queen of Angels School, East Harlem, NY

His Holiness Pope Francis rides in the Papal motorcade through Central Park, NY

His Holiness Pope Francis holds mass in Madison Square Garden,  New York, NY

September 26, 2015

His Holiness Pope Francis holds mass at Cathedral Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul, Philadelphia, PA

His Holiness Pope Francis addresses the crowd, Independence Mall, Philadelphia, PA

His Holiness Pope Francis attends The Festival of Families, Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA

September 27, 2015

His Holiness Pope Francis meets with international bishops, St. Martin’s Chapel, Philadelphia, PA

 His Holiness Pope Francis visits prisoners at Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility, Philadelphia, PA

His Holiness Pope Francis holds a Papal Mass at World Meeting of Families, Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA

His Holiness Pope Francis visits with organizers, volunteers and benefactors of the World Meeting of Families at Atlantic Aviation,  Philadelphia, PA

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#PopeInDC

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Statements of World Religions on Climate Change

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2006 UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST: Threat of Global Warming/Climate Change

3/10/08 Southern Baptist Declaration on the Environment and Climate Change

12/1/08 Bahai International Community: Seizing the Opportunity: Redefining the challenge of climate change

April 2009 Presbyterian Church USA – U.S. Energy Policy and Global Warming

June 2009 A Quaker response to the crisis of climate change

11/30/09 Dalai Lama Urges World to Act on Climate Change

September 2011 United Methodist Church Statement on Climate Change

2/29/12 Judaism and Climate Change: The Yale Forum on Climate Change and the Media

4/19/12 Environment & Ecology in Islam

6/30/13 United Church Of Christ To Become First U.S. Denomination To Move Toward Divestment From Fossil Fuel Companies

5/30/14 Catholic – U.S. Catholic Bishops’ Statement on Climate Change

6/10/14 UNION THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK VOTES UNANIMOUSLY TO DIVEST FROM FOSSIL FUELS

6/28/14 THE UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST ASSOCIATION JOINS FOSSIL FUEL DIVESTMENT MOVEMENT

7/11/14 World Council of Churches rules out fossil fuel investments

9/18/14 First Sikh Statement on Climate Change

9/19/14 Anglican Church of Canada, The Episcopal Church, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada: A Pastoral Message on Climate Change

9/23/14 Interfaith Climate Change Statement

3/30/15 17 Anglican Bishops from all six continents have called for urgent prayer and action on the “unprecedented climate crisis

5/14/15 A Buddhist Declaration on Climate Change: The Time to Act is Now

6/15/15 Pope Francis’ ENCYCLICAL LETTER LAUDATO SI’ ON CARE FOR OUR COMMON HOME

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Learn about President Obama’s Actions to combat Climate Change

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American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978

American Indian Religious Freedom Act

The American Indian Religious Freedom Act, Public Law No. 95-341, 92 Stat. 469 (Aug. 11, 1978) (commonly abbreviated to AIRFA), codified at 42 U.S.C. § 1996, is a United States federal law, enacted by joint resolution of the Congress in 1978. It was enacted to protect and preserve the traditional religious rights and cultural practices of American IndiansEskimosAleuts, and Native Hawaiians. These rights include, but are not limited to, access of sacred sites, freedom to worship through ceremonial and traditional rights and use and possession of objects considered sacred.

The Act required policies of all governmental agencies to eliminate interference with the free exercise of Native American religion, based on the First Amendment, and to accommodate access to and use of religious sites to the extent that the use is practicable and is not inconsistent with an agency’s essential functions. It also acknowledges the prior violation of that right.

Passage

Due to the complex nature of American Indian religious beliefs, American Indian religions have often been at odds with existing federal laws and government policies. There have been three general areas of conflict. Firstly, American Indians did not have access to a number of sacred places that were used in religious ceremonies. Native American religious practices often came into conflict with the idea that American public lands exist for the use and benefit of the American people. The results of the passage of the Indian Removal Act and the General Allotment Act were the displacement of hundreds of tribes, including the Five Civilized Tribes of the southeastern United States, and the forced assimilation of Native American families into agricultural settler societies.

The second conflict was the possession of ceremonial items that are restricted by United States Law, such as eagle feathers or bones (a protected species) or peyote. The conflict lies in the fact that items such as peyote are integral parts of ceremonies practiced by members of churches such as the Native American Church. The use of eagle bones in ceremony has been brought up in any case involving Indian claims on hunting and fishing rights allowed for tribal member to hunt for eagles.

The third general area of conflict was an issue of interference. Sacred ceremonies were sometimes subject to interference from overzealous officials or curious onlookers.

The act itself was more a policy statement, and it acknowledged prior infringement on the right of freedom of religion for American Indians by denying them their First Amendment right of “free exercise” of religion. President Jimmy Carter said, in a statement about the AIRFA, a very similar thing:

In the past, Government agencies and departments have on occasion denied Native Americans access to particular sites and interfered with religious practices and customs where such use conflicted with Federal regulations. In many instances, the Federal officials responsible for the enforcement of these regulations were unaware of the nature of traditional native religious practices and, consequently, of the degree to which their agencies interfered with such practices.

This legislation seeks to remedy this situation.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Indian_Religious_Freedom_Act

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Obama Proclaims Río Grande del Norte a National Monument, Significant Site for Natives

3/26/13 indiancountrytodaymedianetwork

Yesterday, March 25, by proclamation, President Obama established Río Grande del Norte as a National Monument. The announcement of a national monument designation has come in response to considerable input from the community including local businesses, sportsmen, elected officials, Latino organizations, Native American tribes and nearly the entire New Mexico congressional delegation.

The Río Grande del Norte National Monument will boost economic growth in northern New Mexico while permanently protecting the heritage,  water and approximately 240,000 acres of natural areas and wildlife habitat in the region.

Hispano leaders and organizations, small business owners and the Taos and Mora Valley Chambers of Commerce, sportsmen and ranchers, Native American Pueblos and elected officials, and conservation organizations have come together to thank President Obama for protecting Rio Grande del Norte National Monument.

“I applaud President Obama protecting Rio Grande del Norte National Monument because many of the wildlife species that live in that corridor come in and out of this area.  Left unprotected, there may be very few animals available that the Native American people of Taos Pueblo depend on for food, clothing and shelter,” says Benito Sandoval, Taos Pueblo War Chief.

For more: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2013/03/26/obama-proclaims-rio-grande-del-norte-national-monument-significant-site-natives-148361

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Securing Indigenous Rights to Sacred Places With the UN Declaration

5/16/12 Karla E. General – indiancountrytodaymedianetwork

The UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples presents a new opportunity and a new kind of legal authority that could help Native peoples to secure rights to sacred places, and to preserve and protect cultural, religious, and spiritual practices.

The Declaration recognizes and affirms the rights of indigenous peoples to their cultural, religious, and spiritual practices, to have private access to sacred sites (Arts. 12(1), 11(1)), as well as to maintain and strengthen their spiritual relationship with their traditionally held lands, territories, waters and coastal seas and other resources (Art. 25). With the Declaration, Native peoples have rights acknowledged by the international community of nations, including rights to sacred places both within existing reservation or territorial boundaries and beyond.

As rights-holders, Native nations and individuals have the right to cultural, religious, and spiritual practices. As duty-bearer, the U.S. has the responsibility to prevent infringement of these rights.

For more:  http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/05/16/securing-indigenous-rights-sacred-places-un-declaration
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List of Native American Tribe Websites A-Z

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US Govt & Indigenous Peoples Timeline 1819-2014 (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

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Merry Christmas 2013

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WH Christmas Card

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Remarks of President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama

Weekly Address
The White House
December 25, 2013

THE PRESIDENTHello everybody, and happy holidays.

THE FIRST LADY: We know how busy this time of year is for everyone, so we’re not going to take much of your time.

But we did want to take a moment to wish you all a Merry Christmas, from our family to yours.

THE PRESIDENT:  This is a season for millions of Americans to be together with family, to continue long-held holiday traditions, and to show our gratitude to those we love.  And along the way, some of us might even watch a little basketball or eat some Christmas cookies, too.

THE FIRST LADY: Here at the White House, over the past few weeks, we’ve had about 70,000 people from all across the country come visit us and look at our holiday decorations.

This year’s theme was “Gather Around: Stories of the Season.”

And in every room of the house, we tried to tell a story about who we are as Americans and how we celebrate the holidays together.

And we made certain to highlight some of the most powerful stories we know – the stories of our outstanding troops, veterans, and military families and their service and sacrifice for our country.

THE PRESIDENT:  Our extraordinary men and women in uniform are serving so that the rest of us can enjoy the blessings we cherish during the holidays.  But that means many of our troops are far from home and far from family.  They’re spending some extra time on the phone with their loved ones back home. Or they’re setting up video chats so they can watch as the presents are opened.  So today, we want all of our troops to know that you’re in our thoughts and prayers this holiday season.

And here’s the good news: For many of our troops and newest veterans, this might be the first time in years that they’ve been with their families on Christmas.  In fact, with the Iraq war over and the transition in Afghanistan, fewer of our men and women in uniform are deployed in harm’s way than at any time in the last decade.

THE FIRST LADY: And that’s something we all can be thankful for.

And with more and more of our troops back here at home, now it’s our turn to serve – it’s our turn to step up and show our gratitude for the military families who have given us so much.

And that’s why Jill Biden and I started our Joining Forces initiative – to rally all Americans to support our military families in ways large and small.

And again and again, we have been overwhelmed by the response we’ve gotten as folks from across the country have found new ways to give back to these families through their schools, businesses, and houses of worship.

THE PRESIDENT:  That’s the same spirit of giving that connects all of us during the holidays.  So many people all across the country are helping out at soup kitchens, buying gifts for children in need, or organizing food or clothing drives for their neighbors.  For families like ours, that service is a chance to celebrate the birth of Christ and live out what He taught us – to love our neighbors as we would ourselves; to feed the hungry and look after the sick; to be our brother’s keeper and our sister’s keeper.  And for all of us as Americans, regardless of our faith, those are values that can drive us to be better parents and friends, better neighbors and better citizens.

THE FIRST LADY: So as we look to the New Year, let’s pledge ourselves to living out those values by reaching out and lifting up those in our communities who could use a hand up.

THE PRESIDENT:  So Merry Christmas, everyone.  And from the two of us, as well as Malia, Sasha, Grandma, Bo…

THE FIRST LADY: And Sunny, the newest Obama.

THE PRESIDENT:  We wish you all a blessed and safe holiday season.

THE FIRST LADY: Happy holidays everybody, and God bless.

http://youtu.be/b3Dz2yCLQ-c

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Norad Santa Tracker

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NORAD uses radar, satellites, Santa cams, and fighter jets to track Santa Claus.
Track Santa’s location: http://www.noradsanta.org

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Sorry but ProPresObama thread comments &
WH daily schedule not available 12/1/13 – 1/5/14
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