Medicare, Medicaid turns 50

Medicare Medicaid 50th


The Social Security Amendments of 1965Pub.L. 89–97, 79 Stat. 286, enacted July 30, 1965, was legislation in the United States whose most important provisions resulted in creation of two programs: Medicare and Medicaid. The legislation initially provided federal health insurance for the elderly (over 65) and for poor families.

History Many politicians were involved in drafting the final bill that was introduced to the United States Congress in March 1965. On July 30, 1965 President Lyndon B. Johnson (D) signed the bill into law.

The concept of national health insurance began in the early 20th century in the United States and then came to prominence during the Truman administration. Between 1958 and 1964, controversy grew and a bill was drafted. The signing of the act, as part of Johnson’s Great Society, began an era with a greater emphasis on public health issues. Medicare and Medicaid became the United States’ first public health insurance programs. The legislation was vigorously opposed by the American Medical Association until it had been enacted, following which the AMA cooperated in its implementation.

In 1912 Theodore Roosevelt included social insurance for sickness in the platform of his Progressive Party (United States, 1912). Around 1915 the group American Association for Labor Legislation attempted to introduce a medical insurance bill to some state legislatures. These attempts were not successful, and as a result controversy about national insurance came about. National groups supporting the idea of government health insurance included the AFL-CIO, the American Nurses AssociationNational Association of Social Workers, and the Socialist Party USA. The most prominent opponent of national medical insurance was the American Medical Association (AMA); others included the American Hospital Association, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Life Insurance Association of People.

Previous administrations

In 1935, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) signed the Social Security Act, medical benefits were left out of the bill. The committee that Roosevelt appointed to study issues related to Social Security wanted to include health insurance in the bill. However, the committee was concerned that amending the bill to include health insurance would kill the entire bill. Harry Truman took on the idea of national medical care and tried to integrate it into his Fair Deal program. Truman’s attempts were also unsuccessful, though during his presidency the fight for national medical care became specific to the aged population.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Security_Act_of_1965

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Medicare, Medicaid turns 50

As part of the 50th anniversary celebration for these programs, the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is collecting stories of how Medicare and Medicaid have made a difference for everyday Americans.

Please visit Medicare.gov/anniversary/share-your-story to share your Medicare or Medicaid story.

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Social Security Timeline: http://www.ssa.gov/history/1930.html

Learn more about Social Security: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/

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The 2015 White House Conference on Aging

THE 2015 WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING

2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security. The White House held the Conference on Aging to discuss key programs as well as to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade. In the past, conference processes were determined by statute with the form and structure directed by Congress through legislation authorizing the Older Americans Act. To date, Congress has not reauthorized the Older Americans Act, and the pending bill does not include a statutory requirement or framework for the 2015 conference.

THE ISSUES

The face of America is growing older and more diverse as the first baby boomers reached retirement age in 2011, accelerating a population surge in the number of Americans over the age of 65. Each day for the next 15 years, thousands more will reach retirement age, creating new opportunities for how we define what it means to be an older American. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging provided an opportunity to listen to older Americans and engage with the American public about strategies to continue to maximize the contributions of older Americans to our country.

* RETIREMENT SECURITY
* HEALTHY AGING
* LONG-TERM SERVICES AND SUPPORTS
* ELDER JUSTICE

Learn more: http://whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov/

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On the Horizon: The 2015 White House Conference on Aging

Cecilia Muñoz July 29, 2014 01:25 PM EDT

Today at the White House, I was delighted to host a roundtable discussion with leaders from across the aging community who came together to discuss the White House Conference on Aging, which will take place in 2015 – the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security.

Just yesterday, the Medicare Trustees released their annual report finding that, since their report last year, the life of the Medicare Trust Fund has been extended by four additional years to 2030. When this Administration first took office, the Trust Fund was projected to go bankrupt more than a dozen years sooner, in 2017. The Trustees also project that – for the second year in a row – Part B premiums will not increase, allowing seniors to keep more of their Social Security cost-of-living increase.

Thanks in part to the Affordable Care Act, we have improved the affordability of the program, while at the same time helping Medicare work better for seniors. For example, we are closing the prescription drug coverage gap or “donut hole” to make medications more affordable for Medicare beneficiaries. Just today, we learned that 8.2 million seniors and people with disabilities saved $11.5 billion since 2010 – over $1,000 on average for people hitting the donut hole. Additionally, Medicare now provides coverage without cost-sharing for many preventive benefits to help keep older Americans healthy. The Affordable Care Act also responds to older Americans’ desire to remain independent in their communities by creating incentives for states to provide the services and supports that help people remain at home as they age.

For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2014/07/29/horizon-2015-white-house-conference-aging

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GOP Fool’s Vote – Republicans Vote to Repeal Obamacare for 57th Time

SCORE CARD: Republicans Vote to Repeal Obamacare for 57th Time
SCORE CARD: Republicans Vote to Repeal Obamacare for 57th Time

GOP Repeal ObamaCare cartoon

Republicans schedule new ‘Obamacare’ repeal vote 

There’s some disagreement about how many times House Republicans have voted to repeal all or parts of the Affordable Care Act. I’ve seen some estimates of 56 separate votes, though some put the total a little higher.

But let’s not forget their friends on the other side of the Capitol. As National Journal reports, Senate Republicans are at least going through the motions to keep their repeal crusade alive, too.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has proposed repealing Obamacare as part of the long-term highway bill currently being considered in the upper chamber.
McConnell’s office said Friday that the Senate would vote Sunday on an amendment to the highway legislation that would repeal the Affordable Care Act. The initial vote, which would cap debate on the repeal amendment, would need 60 votes.
Obviously, this is a ridiculous endeavor. The very idea of repealing an effective health care law is increasingly bizarre, and as Senate GOP leaders realize, there’s zero chance of the repeal measure passing. The fact that Mitch McConnell sees this as a necessary part of the debate over highway spending is itself quite sad.
So why in the world is the Republican leader doing this, announcing an ACA repeal vote out of the blue? Apparently because McConnell is looking for an adequate pacifier for his far-right flank and this is the best he could come up with.
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7/26/15 House Republicans Vote to Repeal Obamacare for 57th TimeIs this good use of YOUR taxpayer dollars??
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Obamacare Repeal Measure Blocked by Senate Democrats

Jul 26, 2015 12:37 PM PDT Billy House – bloomberg

The amendment to the U.S. highway funding bill that would have killed the Affordable Care Act was proposed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Senate Democrats blocked a proposal to repeal President Barack Obama’s health-care law that Republicans sought to add to a U.S. highway funding bill.

Senators voted 49-43, with 60 required to advance the amendment, during an unusual Sunday session. The federal Highway Trust Fund’s authorization is set after July 31, and the Senate’s highway funding measure, H.R. 22, is significantly different from the plan passed by the House.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, proposed the Obamacare repeal amendment as he also agreed to allow a vote on an amendment sought by Democrats to extend the charter of the Export-Import Bank.

The majority leader said Friday he offered the Obamacare repeal because Ex-Im “shouldn’t be the only vote” on a highway bill amendment. The Senate plans to vote on that amendment next.

McConnell said Sunday that Obamacare is “filled with higher costs, fewer choices and broken promises” and “continues to hammer hardworking middle-class families.”

The House has voted about 60 times to repeal or delay all or part of Obamacare. The Senate was under Democratic control until January.

Senate Ron Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, said a vote to repeal Obamacare would return to a time when health care was “for the healthy and the wealthy.”

“The moment you repeal the Affordable Care Act, millions of Americans lose protections against pre-existing conditions,” Wyden said.

For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2015-07-26/obamacare-repeal-measure-blocked-in-u-s-senate-by-democrats

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EVERY ELECTION IS IMPORTANT!

VOTE FOR DEMOCRATS!

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2015 White House Conference on Aging

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WH Conference on AgingActive Seniors

THE 2015 WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING

2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to recognize the importance of these key programs as well as to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.

In the past, conference processes were determined by statute with the form and structure directed by Congress through legislation authorizing the Older Americans Act. To date, Congress has not reauthorized the Older Americans Act, and the pending bill does not include a statutory requirement or framework for the 2015 conference.

However, the White House is committed to hosting a White House Conference on Aging in 2015 and intends to seek broad public engagement and work closely with stakeholders in developing the conference. We also plan to use web tools and social media to encourage as many older Americans as possible to participate. We are engaging with stakeholders and members of the public about the issues and ideas most important to older individuals, their caregivers, and families. We also encourage people to submit their ideas directly through the Get Involved section on this website.

THE ISSUES

The face of America is growing older and more diverse as the first baby boomers reached retirement age in 2011, accelerating a population surge in the number of Americans over the age of 65. Each day for the next 15 years, thousands more will reach retirement age, creating new opportunities for how we define what it means to be an older American. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging allows us to highlight the contributions of older adults today, and to shape the landscape of aging for the decade to come.

The President believes that older Americans are a tremendous national asset and has consistently worked to support their needs by, for example, strengthening Medicare and protecting Social Security. The White House Conference on Aging offers a unique opportunity to reflect on this work while looking forward to the next decade. We intend to use the year ahead to engage with older Americans, families, researchers, caregivers, leaders in the field of aging, and other stakeholders about the issues of most importance to them.

In our conversations to date, some common themes have emerged, including: how to ensure we prepare for financial needs in retirement; how to remain healthy as we age; what types of services and supports can help older Americans remain independent in the community as we age and how to support this care and the caregivers who provide it; and how to protect older Americans from financial exploitation, abuse, and neglect. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging provides an opportunity to listen to older Americans and engage with the American public about strategies to continue to maximize the contributions of older Americans to our country.

  • RETIREMENT SECURITY
  • HEALTHY AGING
  • LONG-TERM SERVICES AND SUPPORTS
  • ELDER JUSTICE

Learn more: http://whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov/

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Resources from the National Institute on Aging at NIH

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q: What is a White House Conference on Aging?

A: The White House has held a Conference on Aging each decade since the 1960s to identify and advance actions to improve the quality of life of older Americans. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.

Q: When will the next White House Conference on Aging be held and what is its purpose?

A: The White House Conference on Aging will be held in 2015. 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to recognize the importance of these key programs as well as to look ahead to the next decade.

Q: How will the 2015 White House Conference on Aging be organized?

A: In the past, conference processes were determined by statute with the form and structure directed by Congress through legislation, as part of the authorization of the Older Americans Act.

At this point in time, Congress has not reauthorized the Older Americans Act, and the pending bill does not include a statutory requirement or framework for the Conference.

However, the White House is committed to convening the 2015 conference and we will seek broad public engagement and work closely with stakeholders in the lead-up to the conference. We also plan to use web tools and social media to encourage as many older Americans as possible to participate.

The Conference Web site www.WhiteHouseConferenceOnAging.gov provides regular updates on Conference activities. The website also provides opportunities for older Americans and leaders in the field of aging to provide their input and personal stories.

Q: How are issues being selected for the 2015 White House Conference on Aging?

A: We are engaging with stakeholders and members of the public about the issuesmost important to older individuals, their caregivers, and families. To listen and learn from key aging leaders and older Americans, the Administration is participating in listening sessions with older Americans and advocates across the country. These listening sessions began in July 2014 and will continue up to and during the Conference.

As we listen to aging leaders and older Americans, some of the common themes we hear include the following:

  • Retirement security is a vitally important issue. Financial security in retirement provides essential peace of mind for older Americans, but requires attention during our working lives to ensure that we are well prepared for retirement.
  • Healthy aging will be all the more important as baby boomers age. As medical advances progress, the opportunities for older Americans to maintain their health and vitality should progress as well and community supports, including housing, are important tools to promote this vitality.
  • Long-term services and supports remain a priority. Older Americans overwhelmingly prefer to remain independent in the community as they age. They need supports to do so, including a caregiving network and well-supported workforce.
  • Elder justice is important given that seniors, particularly the oldest older Americans, can be vulnerable to financial exploitation, abuse, and neglect. The Elder Justice Act was enacted as part of the Affordable Care Act, and we need to realize its vision of protecting seniors from scam artists and others seeking to take advantage of them.

Q: What activities are planned as we move forward to the 2015 White House Conference on Aging?

A: Monthly webinars for older adults, their families, stakeholders, and others, beginning in December of 2014, will examine the most important issues for older Americans. Additionally, a series of Regional Forums are being planned, and the Executive Director of the White House Conference on Aging is holding listening sessions with stakeholder groups across the country. The Conference website also features a regular blog that provides information and resources on topics of interest to older Americans, their families, caregivers, and others.

2015 WH Conference on Aging Tour

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THE 2015 WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING
Monday, July 13
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM ET

#WHCOA

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2015 Kids’ “State Dinner”

WH Kid's State Dinner - Lrg

2015 Kids State Dinner

2015 Kids’ “State Dinner” Winners Announced!

Today, fifty-five talented and aspiring young chefs found out they are headed to the White House this summer for the fourth annual Kids’ “State Dinner!” With nearly one thousand entries submitted, the winning recipes were selected based on their healthfulness, taste, originality, affordability, and following USDA’s MyPlate recommendations. We were extremely impressed with the incredible recipes that kids cooked up this year!

“Reading over these winning recipes, two things become very clear,” says First Lady Michelle Obama. “America’s kids are passionate about not just eating healthy food, but about cooking healthy food, too.  And we’re raising some truly inventive and talented chefs. I can’t wait to meet our 2015 winners and try some of their recipes at the Kids’ “State Dinner.’”

This year, the First Lady teamed up with PBS flagship station WGBH Boston, the U.S. Department of Education, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to host the Healthy Lunchtime Challenge. The fifty-five winners, representing all U.S. states, four territories, and the District of Columbia, will attend the Kids’ “State Dinner” at the White House hosted by Mrs. Obama on July 10. The young chefs and a parent or guardian will join the First Lady for a healthy lunch, featuring a selection of the winning recipes, followed by a visit to the White House Kitchen Garden.

For more: http://www.letsmove.gov/blog/2015/06/08/2015-kids’-“state-dinner”-winners-announced

Friday, July 10, 2015
President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama hosts
The White House Kids State Dinner
East Room, White House

#KidsStateDinner

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Six Major Rulings from the Supreme Court

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Here Are the Six Major Rulings We’ll Get From the Supreme Court This Week

Jun 24, 2015 12:14 PM PDT Greg Shohr – bloomberg

The U.S. Supreme Court is saving the best for last.

The nation’s top court will issue a series of major rulings over the next several days as it closes its nine-month term. In addition to landmark gay-marriage and Obamacare cases, the court will decide on potentially far-reaching disputes involving housing discrimination, redistricting, air pollution and lethal injection.

“Almost all of the remaining rulings have huge implications and promise to be closely divided,” said Tom Goldstein, a Washington appellate lawyer whose Scotusblog website tracks the court.

The first of seven rulings will come at 10 a.m. Washington time Thursday, with more scheduled for Friday and Monday. The court doesn’t say in advance which decisions are being released which day, but it almost always resolves all its pending cases by the end of June.

Before they pack up, the justices will also say whether they will supplement the session that starts in October with new cases on abortion, affirmative action and union fees.

Here’s what’s coming from the Supreme Court over the next week:

  • Gay Marriage

No case is bigger than the one that could legalize same-sex weddings nationwide. Only 11 years after Massachusetts became the first gay-marriage state, the court would be putting the capstone on the biggest civil rights transformation in a half-century.

 The cases are: Obergefell v. Hodges (Ohio), Tanco v. Haslam (Tennessee), DeBoer v. Snyder (Michigan), and Bourke v. Beshear (Kentucky).

  • Health Care

Three years after upholding President Barack Obama’s signature health-care [Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act] law against a broad constitutional challenge, the court will decide whether a four-word phrase will severely undercut the measure.

The case: King v. Burwell

  • Housing Discrimination

The biggest race case of the term may produce a long-sought legal victory for lenders and insurers, as well as social conservatives. The court is poised to say whether people suing under the U.S. Fair Housing Act can win their case without showing intentional discrimination.

The case:  Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project

  • Lethal Injection

The April 29 argument over lethal injection methods might have been the most heated of the term, with one justice accusing death penalty opponents of waging a “guerrilla war” and another saying she couldn’t trust a state lawyer.

The case: Glossip v. Gross

Supreme Court says Okla. lethal injection doesn’t violate Constitution

  • Clean Air

The utility industry and a group of states are trying to topple an Environmental Protection Agency rule that would cut mercury and other hazardous emissions from 460 coal-fired power plants.

The case: Michigan v. Environmental Protection

  • Redistricing

The court may deal a fresh blow to efforts to make federal elections more competitive by barring states from setting up independent commissions to draw congressional district boundaries. The issue is whether an Arizona commission strips state lawmakers of power reserved to them by the U.S. Constitution.

The case: Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission

For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/politics/articles/2015-06-24/marriage-obamacare-highlight-decision-week-at-u-s-high

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US Supreme Court www.supremecourt.gov

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Summer Food Service Program 2015

During the school year, many children receive free and reduced-price breakfast and lunch through the School Breakfast and National School Lunch Programs.

What happens when school lets out?

Hunger is one of the most severe roadblocks to the learning process. Lack of nutrition during the summer months may set up a cycle for poor performance once school begins again. Hunger also may make children more prone to illness and other health issues. The Summer Food Service Program is designed to fill that nutrition gap and make sure children can get the nutritious meals they need.

Want to help end hunger this  summer? Here are a few ways you can help:

How To Apply

Find meals for children call:

National Hunger Hotline at 1-866-3-HUNGRY or 1-877-8-HAMBRE

For the entire article: http://www.summerfood.usda.gov/

Farm to Summer Resources

Local foods and agriculture-based activities at Summer sites can improve the quality and appeal of Summer Meals, address the summer learning and nutrition gap, bolster your Farm to School efforts with year-round programming, and support local and regional food systems all year long. USDA’s Farm to Summer team has a number of resources available for States interested in promoting the use of local foods their sponsors:

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12 million+ gained Medicaid coverage under ObamaCare

Almost 12 million gained Medicaid coverage under ObamaCare

5/01/15 05:22 PM EDT By Peter Sullivan – TheHIll

More than 11.7 million more people have health insurance through Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance through ObamaCare, new data show.

The new report from the Obama administration shows that as of the end of February, there were over 11.7 million more people enrolled in the programs compared to the period before October 2013, when ObamaCare’s coverage expansion went into effect.

The numbers come on top of another 11.7 million people who signed up for private insurance through the law’s marketplaces.

About 560,000 additional people were enrolled compared to the end of January.

ObamaCare expanded eligibility for Medicaid, the government health insurance program for the poor, up to 138 percent of the poverty line, which is about $33,000 for a family of four.

For more: http://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/240838-almost-12-million-gained-medicaid-coverage-under-obamacare

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) is a federal statute that was signed into United States law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010. This Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (signed into law on March 30, 2010) made up the health care reform of 2010. The laws focus on reform of the private health insurance market, provide better coverage for those with pre-existing conditions, improve prescription drug coverage in Medicare and extend the life of the Medicare Trust fund by at least 12 years.

PPACA passed the Senate on December 24, 2009, by a vote of 60–39 with all Democrats and Independents voting for, and all Republicans voting against. It passed the House of Representatives on March 21, 2010, by a vote of 219–212, with all 178 Republicans and 34 Democrats voting against the bill.

On June 28, 2012 Supreme Court Decision: Health Care Law Constitutional

Obamacare’s projected cost falls due to lower premiums under health care law, CBO says

March 9 2015 at 11:56 AM By Max Ehrenfreund – washingtonpost

The estimated cost of President Obama’s signature health care law is continuing to fall.

The Congressional Budget Office announced on Monday that the Affordable Care Act will cost $142 billion, or 11 percent, less over the next 10 years, compared to what the agency had projected in January.

The nonpartisan agency said the Affordable Care Act will cost less for two essential reasons. The first, and most significant, is that health insurance premiums are rising more slowly, and thus requires less of a government subsidy.

In addition, slightly fewer people are now expected to sign up for Medicaid and for subsidized insurance under the law’s marketplaces. That’s because the agency now says that more people than anticipated already had health insurance before the law took effect, and fewer companies than anticipated are canceling coverage. All in all, three million fewer people are expected to sign up for Affordable Care Act provisions by 2025.

Still, by 2025, the CBO estimates “the total number of people who will be uninsured … is now expected to be smaller than previously projected,” because more will have had health insurance to begin with.

All around, it’s positive news for Obama’s law, which has been accused by Republicans of killing jobs and draining federal coffers. Indeed, the CBO itself warned last year the health care law could reduce full time employment as some chose to give up work that provided health care as they relied instead on the government’s subsidies.

For more: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/03/09/obamacares-cost-is-falling-as-fewer-receive-coverage-under-health-care-law-cbo-says/?hpid=z1

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‘Obamacare’ continues to exceed expectations

6/03/15 08:41AM By Steve Benen – maaddowblog

Waiting for bad news about the Affordable Care Act? Keep waiting. The Hill reported yesterday:

A total of 10.2 million people bought ObamaCare during the most recent sign-up period, federal officials announced Tuesday.

The Obama administration is now officially on track to meet its self-stated 2015 target of 9.1 million customers, the second year in a row that it has achieved a revised enrollment goal.

In a press statement, Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Matthews Burwell noted what is plainly true: “The Health Insurance Marketplaces are working. Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, millions of Americans now rely on the health and financial security that comes from affordable coverage through the Marketplaces.”

For a more detailed look at the latest tally, the estimable Charles Gaba’s report yesterday is a must-read. (Go for the meticulous analysis; stay for the pretty chart.)

An Associated Press report added the latest data also shows that “nearly 9 out of 10 adults now have health insurance.”

But the release of the heartening data, welcomed by those hoping to see the American system succeed, came against a scary backdrop: all of this success may be destroyed very soon and there’s very little affected families can do about it.

Read more: http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/obamacare-continues-exceed-expectations

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What is the Health Insurance Marketplace?

What if I have job-based insurance?

How can I get coverage at lower costs?

What do small businesses need to know?

Am I eligible for Medicaid?

What if I’m self-employed?

What if I have a pre-existing condition?

How the Affordable Care Act is helping people in your State

Health Resources and Services Administration app Find a Health Center

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Learn more: https://www.healthcare.gov

ObamaCare sign up

A member of the audience holds a
A member of the audience holds a “Thank You” sign during President Barack Obama’s speech on medicare fraud and health care insurance reform, at St. Charles High School in St. Charles, Mo., March 10, 2010. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

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Affordable Care Act – The Core Principle

We are a nation that faces its challenges and accepts its responsibilities. We are a nation that does what is hard. What is necessary. What is right. Here, in this country, we shape our own destiny. That is what we do. That is who we are. That is what makes us the United States of America. And we have now just enshrined, as soon as I sign this bill, the core principle that everybody should have some basic security when it comes to their health care.”

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— President Barack Obama, March 23, 2010

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