Abraham Lincoln Memorial

Lincolon Memorial

The Lincoln Memorial is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon; the designer of the primary statue – Abraham Lincoln, 1920 – was Daniel Chester French; the Lincoln statue was carved by the Piccirilli Brothers;  and the painter of the interior murals was Jules Guerin. Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president. It has always been a major tourist attraction and since the 1930s has been a symbolic center focused on race relations.

The building is in the form of a Greek Doric temple and contains a large seated sculpture of Abraham Lincoln and inscriptions of two well-known speeches by Lincoln, The Gettysburg Address and his Second Inaugural Address. The memorial has been the site of many famous speeches, including Martin Luther King‘s “I Have a Dream” speech, delivered on August 28, 1963, during the rally at the end of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_Memorial

Jan 19, 2009 President-elect Obama and Michelle Obama at the Lincoln Memorial
Jan 19, 2009 President-elect Obama and Michelle Obama at the Lincoln Memorial

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PBO Restoring Protection for US Streams and Wetlands

#CleanWaterRules

April 21, 2014
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) published a proposed rule defining the scope of waters protected under the Clean Water Act (CWA) that was open for public comment, in light of the U.S. Supreme Court cases in U.S. v. Riverside Bayview, Rapanos v. United States, and Solid Waste Agency of Northern Cook County v. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (SWANCC). This proposal would enhance protection for the nation’s public health and aquatic resources, and increase CWA program predictability and consistency by increasing clarity as to the scope of ‘‘waters of the United States’’ protected under the Act.

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Protecting Clean Water While Respecting Agriculture

05/27/2015 Gina McCarthy & Jo-Ellen Darcy – epa.gov

Today, EPA and the Army finalized a rule under the Clean Water Act to protect the streams and wetlands we depend on for our health, our economy, and our way of life.

The Clean Water Act has protected our health for more than 40 years—and helped our nation clean up hundreds of thousands of miles of waterways that were choked by industrial pollution, untreated sewage, and garbage for decades.

But Supreme Court cases in 2001 and 2006 put protection of 60 percent of our nation’s streams and millions of acres of wetlands into question. At the same time, we understand much more today about how waters connect to each other than we did in decades past. Scientists, water quality experts, and local water managers are better able than ever before to pinpoint the waters that impact our health and the environment the most.

Members of Congress, farmers, ranchers, small business owners, hunters, anglers, and the public have called on EPA and the Army to make a rule to clarify where the Clean Water Act applies, and bring it in line with the law and the latest science. Today, we’re answering that call.

Every lake and every river depends on the streams and wetlands that feed it—and we can’t have healthy communities downstream without healthy headwaters upstream. The Clean Water Rule will protect streams and wetlands and provide greater clarity and certainty to farmers, all without creating any new permitting requirements for agriculture and while maintaining all existing exemptions and exclusions.

The agencies did extensive outreach on the Clean Water Rule, hosting more than 400 meetings across the country and receiving more than a million public comments. EPA officials visited farms in Arizona, Colorado, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Vermont.

Our nation’s original conservationists—our farmers, ranchers, and foresters—were among the most crucial voices who weighed in during this process. Farmers have a critical job to do; our nation depends on them for food, fiber, and fuel, and they depend on clean water for their livelihoods.

Normal farming and ranching—including planting, harvesting, and moving livestock—have long been exempt from Clean Water Act regulation, and the Clean Water Rule doesn’t change that. It respects producers’ crucial role in our economy and respects the law.

For more: http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2015/05/protecting-clean-water-while-respecting-agriculture/

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Clean Water ActThe Clean Water Act

This Act [ voted into law on October 18, 1972 by Congress’ supermajority vote  over riding President Nixon’s (R) veto]  , is the principle law governing pollution control and water quality of the Nation’s waterways. The objective of this Act is to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Nation’s waters (33 U.S.C. 1251). The Act has been amended numerous times and given a number of titles and codification. It was originally enacted as the Water Pollution Control Act in 1948 (P.L. 80-845), and was completely revised by the 1972 amendments, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments (P.L. 92-500). The 1972 amendments gave the Act its current form, and established a national goal that all waters of the U.S. should be fishable and swimmable. The goal was to be achieved by eliminating all pollutant discharges into waters of the U.S. by 1985 with an interim goal of making the waters safe for fish, shellfish, wildlife and people by July 1, 1983 (86 Stat. 816, 33 U.S.C. 1251) . The 1977 amendments (the Clean Water Act of 1977 (P.L. 95-217)) gave the Act its current title. Additional amendments were enacted in 1981 (Municipal Wastewater Treatment Construction Grants Amendments (P.L. 97-117)) and in 1987 (Water Quality Act of 1987 (P.L. 100-4).  The Act regulates discharges to waters of the United States through permits issued under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting program. The Water Quality Protection Division, issues the NPDES permits and the Water Enforcement Branch assures that all discharges comply with the NPDES permits.

 Learn more: http://www.epa.gov/region6/6en/w/cwa.htm

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Clean Water Legislative History

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clean_water_act

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CleanWaterRules poster

#CleanWaterRules

Trail of Tears – 185th Anniversary

http://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm
http://www.nps.gov/trte/index.htm

May 28, 1830, The Indian Removal Act was signed into law by Andrew Jackson authorizing the president to grant unsettled lands west of the Mississippi in exchange for Indian lands within existing state borders. A few tribes went peacefully, but many resisted the relocation policy. During the fall and winter of 1838 and 1839, the Cherokees were forcibly moved west by the United States government. Approximately 4,000 Cherokees died on this forced march, which became known as the “Trail of Tears.”

The official logo for the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail was developed from a design by Cherokee artist Gary Allen of Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

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US Government Official Apology to The Native Americans

* April 30, 2009
S.J.RES.14 — To acknowledge a long history of official depredations and ill-conceived policies by the Federal Government regarding Indian tribes and offer an apology to all Native Peoples on behalf… (Introduced in Senate – IS)

* SJ 14 IS
111th CONGRESS
1st Session
S. J. RES. 14
To acknowledge a long history of official depredations and ill-conceived policies by the Federal Government regarding Indian tribes and offer an apology to all Native Peoples on behalf of the United States.

* IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES
April 30, 2009

Mr. BROWNBACK (for himself, Mr. INOUYE, Mr. BAUCUS, Mrs. BOXER, Mr. CRAPO, Ms. CANTWELL, Mr. COBURN, Mr. HARKIN, Mr. LIEBERMAN, and Mr. TESTER) introduced the following joint resolution; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Indian Affairs

JOINT RESOLUTION
To acknowledge a long history of official depredations and ill-conceived policies by the Federal Government regarding Indian tribes and offer an apology to all Native Peoples on behalf of the United States.

Whereas the ancestors of today’s Native Peoples inhabited the land of the present-day United States since time immemorial and for thousands of years before the arrival of people of European descent;

Whereas for millennia, Native Peoples have honored, protected, and stewarded this land we cherish;

Whereas Native Peoples are spiritual people with a deep and abiding belief in the Creator, and for millennia Native Peoples have maintained a powerful spiritual connection to this land, as evidenced by their customs and legends;

Whereas the arrival of Europeans in North America opened a new chapter in the history of Native Peoples;

Whereas while establishment of permanent European settlements in North America did stir conflict with nearby Indian tribes, peaceful and mutually beneficial interactions also took place;

Whereas the foundational English settlements in Jamestown, Virginia, and Plymouth, Massachusetts, owed their survival in large measure to the compassion and aid of Native Peoples in the vicinities of the settlements;

Whereas in the infancy of the United States, the founders of the Republic expressed their desire for a just relationship with the Indian tribes, as evidenced by the Northwest Ordinance enacted by Congress in 1787, which begins with the phrase, `The utmost good faith shall always be observed toward the Indians';

Whereas Indian tribes provided great assistance to the fledgling Republic as it strengthened and grew, including invaluable help to Meriwether Lewis and William Clark on their epic journey from St. Louis, Missouri, to the Pacific Coast;

Whereas Native Peoples and non-Native settlers engaged in numerous armed conflicts in which unfortunately, both took innocent lives, including those of women and children;

Whereas the Federal Government violated many of the treaties ratified by Congress and other diplomatic agreements with Indian tribes;

Whereas the United States forced Indian tribes and their citizens to move away from their traditional homelands and onto federally established and controlled reservations, in accordance with such Acts as the Act of May 28, 1830 (4 Stat. 411, chapter 148) (commonly known as the `Indian Removal Act’);

Whereas many Native Peoples suffered and perished–

(1) during the execution of the official Federal Government policy of forced removal, including the infamous Trail of Tears and Long Walk;

(2) during bloody armed confrontations and massacres, such as the Sand Creek Massacre in 1864 and the Wounded Knee Massacre in 1890; and

(3) on numerous Indian reservations;

For more: http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/z?c111:S.J.RES.14:

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“Folks in Indian Country didn’t just wake up one day with addiction problems. Poverty and violence didn’t just randomly happen to this community. These issues are the result of a long history of systematic discrimination and abuse.

Let me offer just a few examples from our past, starting with how, back in 1830, we passed a law removing Native Americans from their homes and forcibly re-locating them to barren lands out west. The Trail of Tears was part of this process. Then we began separating children from their families and sending them to boarding schools designed to strip them of all traces of their culture, language and history. And then our government started issuing what were known as “Civilization Regulations” – regulations that outlawed Indian religions, ceremonies and practices – so we literally made their culture illegal.

And these are just a few examples. I could continue on like this for hours.

So given this history, we shouldn’t be surprised at the challenges that kids in Indian Country are facing today. And we should never forget that we played a role in this. Make no mistake about it – we own this.

And we can’t just invest a million here and a million there, or come up with some five year or ten-year plan and think we’re going to make a real impact. This is truly about nation-building, and it will require fresh thinking and a massive infusion of resources over generations. That’s right, not just years, but generations.

But remember, we are talking about a small group of young people, so while the investment needs to be deep, this challenge is not overwhelming, especially given everything we have to work with. I mean, given what these folks have endured, the fact that their culture has survived at all is nothing short of a miracle.

And like many of you, I have witnessed the power of that culture. I saw it at the Pow Wow that my husband and I attended during our visit to Standing Rock. And with each stomping foot – with each song, each dance – I could feel the heartbeat that is still pounding away in Indian Country. And I could feel it in the energy and ambition of those young people who are so hungry for any chance to learn, any chance to broaden their horizons.

Even the smallest opportunity can make such a huge difference for these kids. I saw that firsthand when Barack and I invited the kids we met in Standing Rock to come visit us at the White House.

They arrived one morning last November, and we showed them around, and took them out for pizza and burgers, and spent some time talking and laughing and hanging out. Altogether, their visit to the White House was just one day long, but as we hugged each of those kids goodbye, one young woman said to Barack, “This visit saved my life.”

And given the odds these kids face, I don’t think she was exaggerating. So if we take a chance on these young people, I guarantee you that we will save lives. I guarantee it.

So we all need to work together to invest deeply – and for the long-term – in these young people, both those who are living in their tribal communities like T.C. and those living in urban areas across this country. These kids have so much promise – and we need to ensure that they have every tool, every opportunity they need to fulfill that promise.

So I want to thank you for your commitment to their futures and for everything you have already done for their communities. I want to thank you for coming here today to learn more about Generation Indigenous and how you can help. And I look forward to seeing the extraordinary impact that you all will have in the years ahead.

Thank you so much, and God bless.”

4/8/15 First Lady Michelle Obama for White House Convening on Creating Opportunity for Native Youth

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US Govt & Indigenous Peoples Timeline 1819-2014 (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

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Memorial Day 2015

Memorial Day History

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

Memorial Day is a United States federal holiday observed on the last Monday of May.

For more: http://www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday/history.asp

Memorial_Day

National Memorial Day Observances
Monday, May 25th – 3:00 pm Local Time

Arlington National Cemetery
Arlington National Cemetery

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1st Lt. John L. Dougherty’s gravesite  The Netherlands Bert Caris and his group from the Netherlands tends to the graves of American Soliders at the Margraten Memorial Center. Please visit their website “Fallen Not Forgotten
1st Lt. John L. Dougherty’s gravesite, The Netherlands
Bert Caris and his group tend to the graves of American Soliders at the Margraten Memorial Center, The Netherlands. Visit their website “Fallen Not Forgotten “.

List of American military cemeteries, federal memorials, monuments and markers located in foreign countries

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Primary School – Best Time To Teach Tolerance

President Barack Obama participates in a literacy lesson with students while visiting a pre-kindergarten classroom at Moravia Elementary School in Baltimore, Md., May 17, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)
President Barack Obama participates in a literacy lesson with students while visiting a pre-kindergarten classroom at Moravia Elementary School in Baltimore, Md., May 17, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Primary school isn’t too soon to start breaking stereotypes. It’s the best time.

How do we break destructive stereotypes? Start early.

May 14, 2015 · 3:00 PM EDT By Marc Sollinger – pri.org

The key to challenging them may lie in early education, argues Claude Steele, the provost and executive vice chancellor at the University of California, Berkeley. He’s also the author of “Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do,” and he studies stereotypes and the psychology behind them.

Steele recalls one study that had a group of adults watch a video of two children playing. The video stopped at different points, and observers had to record what they thought was happening: Were the boys were just horsing around? Were they being aggressive? Or violent?

“In the last frame, one boy shoves another boy, and the critical question is: How do you rate that behavior? When the boy who shoves is white, raters tend to rate that action as just fooling around. When the boy is African-American, they tend to rate that behavior as violent,” Steele says.

He points out that African-American raters are almost as likely to stereotype the boys as violent.

Steele’s research also touches on the huge role of stereotypes in education. Take feedback that a teacher might give to a student.

Steele says a white professor can give critical evaluations of an African-American student in way that doesn’t make the student think the critique is based on race — but the feedback must be offered in the right way. A study by Geoffrey Cohen of Stanford shows professors shouldn’t just deliver the criticism straight, nor should they simply give a positive bromide before launching into the feedback.

What works better, Steele argues, is a professor saying ‘”I’ve looked at your work, we really have high standards here. And though you need to improve those things, I really think you can meet those standards.’ That combination of using high standards signals you’re not just seeing them stereotypically.”

Because America has an extremely diverse student body, schools are melting pots where these sorts of issues have to be dealt with. But Steele actually sees this obligation as a source of hope.

For the entire article and audio interview: http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-05-14/primary-school-isnt-too-soon-start-breaking-stereotypes-its-best-time

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VP Biden @ U.S. Naval Academy Commencement 2015

US Naval Academy Seal

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Vice President Biden to Deliver Remarks at Naval Academy Graduation

APRIL 8, 2015 9:53 AM BY MEDIARELATIONS@USNA.EDU

ANNAPOLIS, Md. – Vice President Joe Biden will deliver remarks at the graduation and commencement ceremony for the U.S.  Naval Academy’s Class of 2015 Friday, May 22.

This event is not open to the public.

Biden, a native of Scranton, Penn., is a graduate of the University of Delaware and Syracuse Law School and served on the New Castle County Council. At the age of 29, he became one of the youngest people ever elected to the United States Senate. Biden was sworn in as the 47th U.S. Vice President on Jan. 20, 2009.

For more: https://www.usna.edu/NewsCenter/2015/04/vice-president-biden-to-deliver-remarks-at-naval-academy-graduation.php

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U.S. Naval Academy Commencement 2013
Vice President Biden – Commencement Speaker
Friday, May 22 @ 10:00 AM ET
Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, Annapolis, MD

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Live Stream: http://new.livestream.com/navy/events/

 

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May 2015 Leading Major Country PMI Comparisons

U.S. Manufacturing Still Number One

May 2015 Major Economy PMI Comparison 2

Manufacturing PMIs for May are out, and the United States, despite declining to lowest since January 2014 today, is still some way ahead of the rest of the world. This continues a trend that has been in place since the spring of last year.A reading above 50 points to an expansion in manufacturing. The United States is the only major economy that has not fallen below that point in the past three years. 
Bloomberg Source

May 2015 Major Economy PMI Comparison

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