Vernon F. Dahmer, Sr., NAACP Activist – 50th Anniversary of His Murder by KKK

Vernon F. Dahmer, SrVernon Ferdinand Dahmer, Sr. (March 10, 1908 – January 10, 1966)  was an African American Civil Rights leader and president of the Forrest County chapter of the NAACP in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

Early life

Vernon Dahmer was born on March 10, 1908 in the Kelly Settlement, Forrest County, Mississippi to Ellen Louvenia (Kelly) and George Washington Dahmer. George Dahmer was a Caucasian man identified as being an honest, hardworking man with outstanding integrity. his occupation was a farmer. Ellen Kelly was biracial because of her mother, Henrietta. Henrietta was a biracial child born out of wedlock by a white slave owner, O.B Kelly, and one of his slaves. She was given to a black family, called the McCombs.

Vernon Dahmer attended Bay Spring High School until the tenth grade; failing to graduate. Vernon was light-skinned enough to pass as a Caucasian man, but instead chose to forgo the privileges of living as a Caucasian man and faced the daily challenges of being an African American man in Mississippi during that time.

Dahmer had three wives throughout the entirety of his life. His first wife was Winnie Laura Mott; they had ended their marriage of five years in divorce. In 1949, Dahmer had remarried to a woman named Aura Lee Smith. Unfortunately, Aura had died after a long illness. Ellie Jewel Davis was his third and final wife; she was a teacher from Rose HillMississippi, and had recently moved to Forrest County. The couple had met after working on the school board together and married in March 1952. The couple had two children of their own together to add to the six children Vernon had had with his first two wives; seven boys and one girl. The family and their home was located north of Forrest County and was part of the Kelly Settlement, close to the Jones County boarder; the settlement (named for Dahmer’s maternal grandfather). Ellie Dahmer taught for many years in Richton, Mississippi and retired in 1987 from the Forrest County school system.

Dahmer was a member of Shady Grove Baptist Church where he served as a music director and Sunday School teacher. Dahmer was the owner of a grocery store, sawmill, planing mill, and also cotton farm. Dahmer’s main objective was to make a living for himself and to provide work for somebody else. Vernon would hire local individuals from the community to work for him and did not discriminate between black or white.

Civil Rights Movement

During the Civil Rights Movement Vernon served two terms as president of the Forrest County Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and led voter registration drives in the 1960s. His wife Ellie said “He was a good progressive Christian man. He wasn’t a mean, bitter Civil Rights worker, because he saw good in White as well as he did in Black.” As president of the Forrest County Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Vernon had personally asked the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to send workers to help aid the voter registrations efforts being made by African Americans in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. SNCC had sent two workers, Curtis Hayes and Hollis Watkins, to Hattiesburg. The act of calling SNCC to help aid the efforts made by the NAACP would eventually cost Vernon his NAACP presidency.

in 1949 Dahmer was in the process of making out his new registration card when Luther Cox denied his attempts to re-register. Luther Cox was the authority figure in charge of registered voters in Forrest County and was a white segregationist. Cox would only authorize a registration of an African American if they could answer the question “How many bubbles are in a bar of soap?” In 1950, fifteen leaders of the Forrest County‘s black community, including Dahmer, filled a lawsuit against Cox for his administration of the voting laws; preliminary injunction. Twelve years late in March 1962, the preliminary injunction was in motion of being viewed by the court of law. Dahmer had testified in court against Luther Cox and his testimony helped demonstrate the pattern of discrimination in the county.

In the 1950s Vernon Dahmer and Medgar Evers founded a youth National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) chapter in Hattiesburg. Unfortunately the student chapter did not last longer than a year. Dahmer continued to be supportive of the Student Nonviolence Coordinating Committee (SNCC) throughout the Civil Rights Movement. Vernon’s farm quickly became a home away from home for SNCC volunteers. The farm was also used for registration projects and helped employee the committee volunteers. Dahmer was also working closely with Coalition for Free and Open Election, COFO and the Delta Ministry.

Dahmer kept a voter registration book in his grocery store in late 1965 to make it easier for African Americans to register. Dahmer also made a public service announcement over the radio stating that he would helped the local African American population pay a poll tax for the right to vote if they could not afford to do so themselves. His mantra was, “If you don’t vote, you don’t count,” and those words, which he repeated on his deathbed, were used as his epitaph.

For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernon_Dahmer

 

The firebombed home of Vernon Dahmer, Sr by the Klu Kux Klan 1/10/1966
The firebombed home of Vernon Dahmer, Sr by the Klu Kux Klan 1/10/1966

 

Murder and suspects

Vernon and Ellie Dahmer had been sleeping in shifts after receiving numerous death threats throughout the year. The Dahmer’s had a shotgun by their nightstand if case they had heard gunshots and always had the curtains drawn tight at night to make it harder for night riders to see into their home. On January 10, 1966 the Dahmer home was attacked by the White Knights of the Ku Klux Klan. The family woke to the sound of a shotgun being shot and the sound of gas jugs being thrown through the windows. As Ellie went to grab the children the house erupted into fire. Vernon returned fire from inside the house to try and distract the Klan’s men while he helped hand Betty down to Ellie. Vernon was able to leave his burning home but was severely burned from the waist up; his daughter Betty also had severe burns on her arms. The Dahmer’s home, grocery store, and car were all destroyed in the fire. Vernon was taken to the hospital and passed away due to his lungs being severely burned and smoke inhalation. Before he died, Dahmer had told a local newspaper reporter: “I’ve been active in trying to get people to register to vote. People who don’t vote are deadbeats on the state. I figure a man needs to do his own thinking. What happened to us last night can happen to anyone, white or black. At one time I didn’t think so, but I have changed my mind.”

The Hattiesburg area was stunned by the attack. The Chamber of Commerce under William Carey, College President Dr. Ralph Noonkester, and Bob Beech had led a community effort to rebuild the Dahmer home. Local and state businesses such as the Masonite Corporation, Alexander Materials, and Frierson Building Materials donated materials, local unions donated their services, and students from the University of Southern Mississippi volunteered unskilled labor. Bob Beech’s second priority was to provide college funds for Dahmer’s school-aged children.Four of Dahmer’s sons were in the United States Military and had left their posts to help bury their father and reconstruct their families home

Authorities indicted fourteen men, most with Ku Klux Klan connections, were tried for the attack on the Dahmer home. Thirteen were brought to trial, eight on charges of arson and murder. Four were convicted and Billy Roy Pitts (Sam Bowers’ body guard), who had dropped his gun at the crime scene, entered a guilty plea and had his gun turned in as state evidence. Billy faced just three years of his federal sentence. However three out four of those convicted were pardoned within four years. In addition, eleven of the defendants were tried on federal charges of conspiracy to intimidate Dahmer because of his civil rights activities. Former Ku Klux Klan Imperial Wizard Sam Bowers, who was believed to have ordered the murder, was tried four times and each time pleaded the fifth amendment. Each trial ended in a mistrial.

Finally 25 years after the murder of Vernon Dahmer and assault on his family, the case was reopened by the state of Mississippi in 1991. The case lasted for seven years, and ended by the conviction and sentencing to life in prison, of Imperial Wizard Sam Bowers in 1998. Bowers died in the Mississippi State Penitentiary on November 5, 2006 at the age of 82.

For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernon_Dahmer#Murder_and_suspects

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Congressional Black Congress – 45th Anniversary

1977, 15 of the Congressional Black Caucus members L -R (front row) B Jordan of TX, R Nix, Sr., of PA, R Metcalfe of IL, C Collins of IL P Mitchell of MD, G Hawkins of CA, S Chisholm of NY; (middle row) J Conyers, Jr., of MI, C Rangel of NY, H Ford, Sr., of TN, Y Brathwaite Burke of CA, W Fauntroy of the DC; (back row) R Dellums of CA, L Stokes of OH, and C C. Diggs, Jr., of MI
1977, 15 of the Congressional Black Caucus members
L -R (front row) B Jordan of TX, R Nix, Sr., of PA, R Metcalfe of IL, C Collins of IL P Mitchell of MD, G Hawkins of CA, S Chisholm of NY; (middle row) J Conyers, Jr., of MI, C Rangel of NY, H Ford, Sr., of TN, Y Brathwaite Burke of CA, W Fauntroy of the DC; (back row) R Dellums of CA, L Stokes of OH, and C C. Diggs, Jr., of MI

.As the number of African Americans serving in Congress grew, a long-desired movement to form a more unified organization among black legislators coalesced. When Charles C. Diggs, Jr., of Michigan entered the House of Representatives in 1955, he joined black Members William Dawson of Illinois and Adam Clayton Powell—the largest delegation of African Americans on Capitol Hill since Reconstruction. “In Congress, there was little, if any communication between Dawson and Powell,” Diggs noted. “Their styles were different. In terms of exercise between them, there was not any.” Diggs keenly felt the isolation endured by black Members due to their small numbers in Congress and, in some cases, an inability to connect on a personal level. Frustrated that black Representatives lacked a forum to discuss common concerns and issues, Diggs proposed the organization of the Democratic Select Committee (DSC) at the opening of the 91st Congress (1969–1971), maintaining that the DSC would fill a significant void by fostering the exchange of information among the nine African Americans serving in Congress, as well as between black Representatives and House leadership. “The sooner we get organized for group action, the more effective we can become,” Diggs remarked.  The informal group held sporadic meetings that were mainly social gatherings and had no independent staff or budget.

Newly elected Members and beneficiaries of court-ordered redistricting, William (Bill) Clay, Sr., of Missouri, Louis Stokes of Ohio, and Shirley Chisholm embraced the concept of a group for black legislators to “seize the moment, to fight for justice, to raise issues too long ignored and too little debated”—all of which quickly translated into a more influential association for African-American Members.

For more:  http://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/BAIC/Historical-Essays/Permanent-Interest/Congressional-Black-Caucus/

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Congressional Black Congress

Since its establishment in 1971, Members of the Congressional Black Caucus have joined together to empower America’s neglected citizens and to address their legislative concerns.For more than 40 years, the CBC has consistently been the voice for people of color and vulnerable communities in Congress and has been committed to utilizing the full Constitutional power, statutory authority, and financial resources of the Government of the United States of America to ensure that everyone in the United States has an opportunity to achieve their version of the American Dream.

The legislative agenda of universal empowerment that Members of the Congressional Black Caucus collectively pursue include but are not limited to: the creation of universal access to a world-class education from birth through post secondary level; the creation of universal access to quality, affordable health care and the elimination of racially based health disparities; the creation of universal access to modern technology, capital and full, fairly-compensated employment; the creation and or expansion of U.S. foreign policy initiatives that will contribute to the survival, health, education and general welfare of all peoples of the world in a manner consistent with universal human dignity, tolerance and respect and such other legislative action as a majority of the entire CBC Membership may support.

For more: http://cbc.fudge.house.gov

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DNC 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidates’ Debate – New Hampshire

Proud to be a Democrat
The Democratic National Party
For more than 200 years, our party has led the fight for civil rights, health care, Social Security, workers’ rights, and women’s rights.

We are the party of Barack Obama, John F. Kennedy, FDR, and the countless everyday Americans who work each day to build a more perfect union.

1920’s 

19TH AMENDMENT: WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE

Under the leadership of Democratic President Woodrow Wilson, the U.S. Constitution was amended to grant women the right to vote. In August of 1920, Tennessee’s became the 36th state to ratify women’s suffrage, and it became our nation’s 19th amendment.

1930’s 

Americans turned to Democrats and elected President Franklin D. Roosevelt to end the Great Depression. President Roosevelt offered Americans a New Deal that put people back to work, stabilized farm prices, and brought electricity to rural homes and communities. Under President Roosevelt, Social Security established a promise that lasts to this day: growing old would never again mean growing poor.

SOCIAL SECURITY ACT – One of the most enduring parts of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal, the Social Security Act provides assistance to retirees, the unemployed, widows, and orphans. By signing this act, Franklin D. Roosevelt was the first president to advocate for federal assistance for the elderly. It was largely opposed by Republican legislators.

1940’s 

In 1944, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the G.I. Bill—a historic measure that provided unprecedented benefits for soldiers returning from World War II, including low-cost mortgages, loans to start a business, and tuition and living expenses for those seeking higher education. Harry Truman helped rebuild Europe after World War II with the Marshall Plan and oversaw the formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. By integrating the military, President Truman helped to bring down barriers of race and gender and pave the way the way for civil rights advancements in the years that followed.

In the 1960s, Americans again turned to Democrats and elected President John F. Kennedy to tackle the challenges of a new era. President Kennedy dared Americans to put a man on the moon, created the Peace Corps, and negotiated a treaty banning atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons.

And after President Kennedy’s assassination, Americans looked to President Lyndon Johnson, who offered a new vision of a Great Society and signed into law the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act.

1960’s 

 CIVIL RIGHTS ACT – This landmark piece of legislation outlawed major forms of discrimination against African Americans and women and prohibited racial segregation. Signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, it ended unequal voting requirements and segregated schools, workplaces, and public facilities.

President Johnson’s enactment of Medicare was a watershed moment in America’s history that redefined our country’s commitment to our seniors—offering a new promise that all Americans have the right to a healthy retirement.

1970’s 

In 1976, in the wake of the Watergate scandal, Americans elected Jimmy Carter to restore dignity to the White House. He created the Departments of Education and Energy and helped to forge a lasting peace between Israel and Egypt.

1990’s

In 1992, after 12 years of Republican presidents, record budget deficits, and high unemployment, Americans turned to Democrats once again and elected Bill Clinton to get America moving again. President Clinton balanced the budget, helped the economy add 23 million new jobs, and oversaw the longest period of peacetime economic expansion in history.
21st century

21st Century

In 2008, Americans turned to Democrats and elected President Obama to reverse our country’s slide into the largest economic downturn since the Great Depression and undo eight years of policies that favored the few over the many.

Under President Obama’s direction and congressional Democrats’ leadership, we’ve reformed a health care system that was broken and extended health insurance to 32 million Americans.

.PATIENT PROTECTION AND AFFORDABLE CARE ACT –  After decades of trying and despite unanimous opposition from Republicans, President Obama and Democrats passed comprehensive health reform into law in March 2010. The Affordable Care Act will hold insurance companies accountable, lower costs, expand coverage, and improve care for all Americans.

We’ve reined in a financial system that was out of control and delivered the toughest consumer protections ever enacted.

We’ve reworked our student loan system to make higher education more affordable.

We passed the Recovery Act, which created or helped to save millions of jobs and made unprecedented investments in the major pillars of our country.

From America’s beginnings to today, people have turned to Democrats to meet our country’s most pressing challenges—and pave the way for a future that lifts up all Americans.

Democratic Party – ISSUES
Civil Rights
Education
Energy Independence
Environment
Health Care
Immigration Reform
Jobs and the Economy
National Security
Open Government
Retirement Security
Science and Technology
Voting Rights

.2016 Presidential Democratic Candidates - Oct 2015

2016 Democratic Presidential Candidates’ Debate

Democratic National Committee announced that six debates are scheduled — at a pace of roughly one per month , this will give voters ample opportunities to hear the 2016 Democratic Presidential candidates discuss their visions for our country’s future.

Debates provide a opportunity for our candidates to engage in a rigorous discussion, not only with each other, but also to show the American people where Democrats stand. The Democratic National Committee has scheduled six debates that will highlight the stark differences between Democrats and Republicans, and help ensure that whoever caucus goers and voters choose as the Democratic nominee will become the 45th President of the United States.

What?

Our Democratic candidates are committed to fighting for middle-class families and expanding opportunities to pursue the American Dream, while Republicans continue to push for policies that are out of date and out of touch.

Who?

Hillary Clinton
Martin O’Malley
Bernie Sanders

When?

December 19, 2015
7:00 PM ET
Saint Anselm College, Manchester, NH
Hosted by ABC/ New Hampshire Democratic Party/The Union-Leader

 

Why?

The choice the American people will face in next November’s election couldn’t be more important. Voters across the country are going to decide between two very different plans for our country — an economy built to last that will strengthen and sustain our middle class, or the failed trickle-down economics of the past. These debates will highlight the Democratic Party’s policies, which will continue to strengthen the middle class, and we hope Americans across the political spectrum will tune in.

Since 1848, the Democratic National Committee has been the home of the Democratic Party, the oldest continuing party in the United States.

Today we are millions of supporters strong, fighting for progress and helping elect Democrats across the country to state government, Congress, and the White House.

There are several core beliefs that tie our party together: Democrats believe that we’re greater together than we are on our own—that this country succeeds when everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules. Our party, led by President Obama, is focused on building an economy that lifts up all Americans, not just those at the top.

That’s why Democrats are working to make progress on issues like job creation, equal pay, education, health care, and clean energy.

For more: http://www.democrats.org/Post/democratic-national-committee-announces-six-primary-debates

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Democratic Party Presidential Primary 2016 Endorsements
Hillary Clinton
Martin O’Malley
Bernie Sanders

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Democratic Party
Democratic Party History
Democratic Party Leaders
Democratic Party Organization
Democratic State Parties
DNC Facebook
DNC Twitter
DNC Pinerest
DNC Youtube

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2016 Democratic Presidential Candidates’ Debate
December 19, 2015
8:00 PM ET
Saint Anselm College, Manchester, NH
Hosted by ABC/ New Hampshire Democratic Party/The Union-Leader

Live Stream: http://abclive.abcnews.com/i/abc_live4@136330/master.m3u8

#DemDebate

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Racism is NOT Equal Justice Under The Law

Scalia makes racially charged argument in affirmative-action case

12/09/15 03:45 PM By Steve Benen – maddowblog

 .
About a month ago, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia spoke to first-year law students at Georgetown, where he drew a parallel between gay people, pedophiles, and child abusers. What would he do for an encore?
  .
This morning, the high court heard oral arguments in a Texas case on affirmative action and the use of race in college admissions, and NBC News reported that Scalia “questioned whether some minority students are harmed by the policy because it helped them gain admittance to schools where they might not be able to academically compete.”
 .
At first blush, that sounds pretty racist, so let’s check the official transcript:
“There are – there are those who contend that it does not benefit African Americans to ­­ to get them into the University of Texas where they do not do well, as opposed to having them go to a less­-advanced school, a less – a slower-track school where they do well.
 .
“One of – one of the briefs pointed out that – that most of the – most of the black scientists in this country don’t come from schools like the University of Texas. They come from lesser schools where they do not feel that they’re – that they’re being pushed ahead in – in classes that are too ­­ too fast for them.”
If we were to go out of our way to be charitable, I suppose we could emphasize the fact that Scalia prefaced these comments by saying “there are those who contend.” In other words, maybe the far-right justice himself isn’t making such an ugly argument, so much as the justice is referencing an offensive argument from unnamed others?
 .
It is, to be sure, a stretch. At no point did Scalia say he disagrees with “those who contend” that African-American students who struggle at good universities and are better off at “a slower-track school.”
 .
David Plouffe, a former aide to President Obama, highlighted Scalia’s quote this afternoon and asked a pertinent question: “Motivation lacking for 2016?”
.
As for the case itself, Fisher v. Texas, which has been bouncing around for a long while, MSNBC’s Irin Carmon reported that the dispute stems from a complaint filed by Abigail Fisher, a white woman “who claims she was denied admission to the University of Texas because of her race, despite the fact that a lower court found she wouldn’t have been admitted regardless of her race.”
 .
And how did oral arguments go? Carmon added:
The liberals worked to poke holes in the argument that Texas cannot put race on the list of holistic factors. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg made the same point she had made the first time Fisher came to the court, which is that the supposedly “race-neutral” process of admitting the top 10 percent, which isn’t being challenged in this case, isn’t race-neutral at all, because it makes virtue out of a long history of school and housing segregation and discrimination. Justice Elena Kagan didn’t say a word, because she has recused herself, having worked on the case as solicitor general. Justice Sonia Sotomayor fiercely challenged Fisher’s attorneys.
 .
Meanwhile, three of the four most conservative members of the court reiterated that they oppose affirmative action and would overturn the court’s precedent that it is allowed as a last resort to promote educational diversity. Chief Justice John Roberts repeatedly asked when remedies to racial discrimination would no longer be needed. (Judging from his past decisions, he believes the time is now.) Justice Samuel Alito tried to argue that advocates for affirmative action are themselves making racist or condescending judgments.
“EQUAL JUSTICE UNDER LAW”-These words, written above the main entrance to the Supreme Court Building, express the ultimate responsibility of the Supreme Court of the United States. The Court is the highest tribunal in the Nation for all cases and controversies arising under the Constitution or the laws of the United States. As the final arbiter of the law, the Court is charged with ensuring the American people the promise of equal justice under law and, thereby, also functions as guardian and interpreter of the Constitution.

Those racist remarks that SC Justice Scalia said are against everything that the Supreme Court and The United States Consitution stand for and is a reason for his impeachment.

SCOTUS liberal vs conservatives 2014

Vote Every Election

Vote Every Election

Let’s be very clear, while we’re tuning out and staying home on Election Day, other folks are tuning in.  Other folks are taking politics very seriously.  And they’re engaged on every level.  They’re raising money.  They’re making their voices heard –- and their issues known –- from City Hall to Washington, DC.  And I know that in the face of all of that money and influence, it can start to feel like ordinary citizens just can’t get a seat at the table.  And that can make you feel helpless and hopeless.  It can make you feel or think that you’re powerless.

But I’m here today because that’s simply not true.  We are not helpless or hopeless.  Time and again, history has shown us that there is nothing –- nothing -– more powerful than ordinary citizens coming together for a just cause.”

” I’m talking about the tireless, the thankless, relentless work of making change — you know, the phone-calling, letter-writing, door-knocking, meeting-planning kind of work.  That is the real work of democracy –- what happens during those quiet moments between the marches. ”

“That is how we carry on that precious legacy we’ve inherited — by recommitting ourselves to that day-to-day, vitally important work that has always paved the way for change in this country.

What does that mean?  That means being informed.  It means following the news, and learning about who’s representing us, and how our governments work.  It means showing up to vote — and not just every four years, but every year in every election.  It means engaging with the folks we elect, following how they vote and how they spend our hard-earned tax dollars.  And if you don’t like what you see, then let them know, or better yet, run for a seat at the table yourself.  ”

June 28, 2012 First Lady Michelle Obama at the AME Church Conference

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The World Reacts to Trump’s Proposed Ban on Muslims

hate Donald Trump screaming

Hate Group

hate group is an organized group or movement that advocates and practices hatredhostility, or violence towards members of a raceethnicitynationreligiongendergender identitysexual orientation or any other designated sector of society. According to the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), a hate group’s “primary purpose is to promote animosity, hostility, and malice against persons belonging to a race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or ethnicity/national origin which differs from that of the members of the organization.” 

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hate_group

Donald Trump urges ban on Muslims entering United States

Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump on Monday called for a ban on Muslims entering the United States in the most dramatic response by a candidate yet to last week’s shooting spree by two Muslims who the FBI said had been radicalized.

“We have no choice,” Trump said at a rally in South Carolina, warning of more Sept. 11-style attacks if stern measures are not taken.

Read more: http://www.reuters.com/article/usa-election-trump-idUSKBN0TQ2QT20151208#2RJUUs9vHCE2RKaS.99

White supremacist groups see Trump bump 

‘He has sparked an insurgency,’ Stormfront founder says.

The Ku Klux Klan is using Donald Trump as a talking point in its outreach efforts. Stormfront, the most prominent American white supremacist website, is upgrading its servers in part to cope with a Trump traffic spike. And former Louisiana Rep. David Duke reports that the businessman has given more Americans cover to speak out loud about white nationalism than at any time since his own political campaigns in the 1990s.

As hate group monitors at the Southern Poverty Law Center and the Anti-Defamation League warn that Trump’s rhetoric is conducive to anti-Muslim violence, white nationalist leaders are capitalizing on his candidacy to invigorate and expand their movement.

“Demoralization has been the biggest enemy and Trump is changing all that,” said Stormfront founder Don Black, who reports additional listeners and call volume to his phone-in radio show, in addition to the site’s traffic bump. Black predicts that the white nationalist forces set in motion by Trump will be a legacy that outlives the businessman’s political career. “He’s certainly creating a movement that will continue independently of him even if he does fold at some point.”

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2015/12/donald-trump-white-supremacists-216620#ixzz3tw1Ie1L3

 

#DenounceTrump

#NoToTrump

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Malala Yousafzai's reply to Donald Trump's plan to ban Muslims from entering the U.S.
Malala Yousafzai’s reply to Donald Trump’s plan to ban Muslims from entering the U.S.
Muslims against terrorism
A group of Muslims pray and attend a rally in front of Trump Tower on December 20, 2015 in New York (AFP Photo/Kena Betancur)

The Rest of the Sane World’s Response to Donald Trump’s Ban on Muslims

The world reacts to Trump’s proposed ban on Muslims entering U.S.

December 8 at 9:44 AM By Annie Gowen – washingtonpost

NEW DELHI — Leading U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s call for a complete ban on Muslims entering the United States was widely condemned around the world Tuesday.

Citizens, commentators and politicians slammed Trump’s latest controversial statement, calling it hate speech and a disturbing sign of Islamophobia in a country rattled in recent weeks by large-scale terror attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif.

The billionaire developer and reality television star released a statement Monday calling for “a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country’s representatives can figure out what is going on.”

Later Monday, Trump, 69, read the statement out loud at a rally in Charleston, S.C., where an enthusiastic crowd greeted him with cheers and chants of “Trump! Trump!” and “U.S.A.! U.S.A.!”

“We have no choice. We have. No. Choice,” Trump said, with a shake of his head. His statement may be politically incorrect, he said, “but I don’t care!”

The heated rhetoric left many Muslims feeling bewildered, scared and angry. In Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley, for example, Syrians stranded in overcrowded, cold refugee camps said they worried that rising xenophobia could further complicate their hopes of seeking asylum in the United States.

“How can a country that always talks about human rights and freedom do this or even consider this?” said Bourhan Salem, 32, who fled to the Bekaa to escape the violence around his home in Syria’s Daraa province. “Do they know what we have suffered?”

Dar al-Ifta, Egypt’s official religious body, issued a statement that condemned Trump for “hate rhetoric” that “will increase tension” in the United States, which is home to millions of Muslims who are “peaceful and loyal American citizens.”

And in Kabul, a property dealer named Timur Shah said Americans need to “rise up” and prevent Trump from becoming their leader.

“None of us deserve him. What he says is harmful for all of us and will help the Islamic State and fanatics on all sides,” Shah said.

In France, where the ruling Socialists are in a pitched election battle with a far-right anti-immigrant party, Prime Minister Manuel Valls on Tuesday wrote on Twitter that “Trump, like others, stokes hatred and conflations: our ONLY enemy is radical Islamism.”

Valls’s implicit comparison was with the National Front party, which is poised to seize power in local legislatures around France in runoff elections on Sunday. National Front leader Marine Le Pen has seized on fears of Muslims and terrorism to create a potent ballot-box force even as mainstream voices in France have promoted moderation.

In Britain, Prime Minister David Cameron joined British politicians from all parties in condemning Trump’s remarks. While it is rare for a British prime minister to comment on contenders in the U.S. presidential race, Cameron’s spokeswoman said he “completely disagrees” with Trump’s comments, which he regards as “divisive, unhelpful and quite simply wrong.”

Cameron’s spokeswoman told reporters: “The prime minister has been very clear that, as we look at how we tackle extremism and this poisonous ideology, what politicians need to do is look at ways they can bring communities together and make clear that these terrorists are not representative of Islam and indeed what they are doing is a perversion of Islam.”

When asked if Cameron would be willing to meet Trump or whether he could be banned from Britain, his spokeswoman declined to answer, saying the questions were “hypothetical.”

Trump’s call also drew reactions from journalists and editorial writers throughout Europe and in Israel, where he is due to arrive for a visit later this month. Israeli columnist Chemi Shalev said the sight of the crowds cheering Trump evoked the early days of Nazi Germany.

“For some Jews, the sight of thousands of supporters waving their fists in anger as Trump incited against Muslims and urged a blanket ban on their entry to the United States could have evoked associations with beer halls in Munich a century ago,” Shalev wrote in the Israeli daily newspaper Haaretz.

Trump’s comments were widely covered in the European media, with many outlets wondering if he went too far this time. The German daily Süddeutsche Zeitung ran an editorial with the headline, “How Donald Trump is betraying America.”

London’s Daily Telegraph newspaper called the statement a “bombshell” even by Trump’s standards. The Guardian wrote that he was “further out of the mainstream than he has been at any point since announcing his candidacy.”

Trump’s comment garnered worldwide reaction on social media as well.

In Brazil, acclaimed journalist Patricia Campos Mello shared a Slate story on Trump on her Facebook page and commented: “There is no way for this guy to get more dumb.” One of the commenters responded, “There is, wait and see.”

One Saudi Arabian woman, Naveen Malek, said in a tweet: “We are facing a Third World War these days. The new leaders of intolerance are people such as Trump and the French far-right.”

Trump has bolstered his popularity with a series of increasingly controversial remarks — on women, Hispanic immigrants, the disabled and Muslims. Yet he has remained solidly atop national polls among Republican presidential candidates since July, according to Real Clear Politics, except for a brief period in early November when he and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson were in a statistical dead heat.

Conventional political wisdom long expected him to fade from the race after an early peak, but he was defied such theories so far, prompting one Republican political operative to write a memo earlier this month detailing “the Trump phenomenon” and urging Republican candidates to adopt the “best elements” of his “anti-populist agenda.”

“Trump has given voice to the rhetoric of hatred which has always been in the American society in some form or another. Sometimes the hatred is for blacks, sometimes for communists. Today it is Muslims,” said Shahid Siddiqui, a former member of parliament in India, who edits the Nai Duniya Urdu newspaper and is the co-founder of a group called Inter-Faith Peace Foundation.

For more: https://goo.gl/unfBNC

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A Terrorism Survivor’s Answer to Trump
He survived 9/11. And now LP Kiatoukaysy is disheartened that the unifying spirit it fostered has been trumped by fear and hate.

 Dec 14, 2015 By LP Kiatoukaysy – Perspectives

If a pollster asked Americans who have actually survived a terrorist attack what they thought of the current hate rhetoric from some politicians and commentators what would they say?

I’m a 9/11 survivor. I ran dust covered from debris falling from the south tower after the second plane hit. I saw people die. I saw dead bodies and body parts. I helped a woman bleeding from being impaled by metal get to safety. I watched in horror as people jumped from the burning towers – but quickly turned away because the suffering was beyond what I could manage. My neighborhood was a military zone for six months. I lost two very close colleagues on 9/11. I have also lost a military friend to this so-called “war on terror”. I have, to be frank, suffered and lost profoundly.

Immediately after 9/11 I attended several memorials in New York City and support groups for people who lost loved ones. Everyone did. The love expressed in these groups among people of all different backgrounds was profound, including Muslims who had suffered equally.  The moderator asked if our feelings about Muslims had changed. No one expressed ill will or hatred. I am talking about people who just lost a husband, a child, a loved one. Real loss. We all hugged, and cried, and expressed our shared love for America, New York and all New Yorkers.

The optimist in me believes this theoretical poll would reveal most survivors have a balanced view on Muslims. When you have experienced profound loss the need to understand that loss leads to the desire for answers. Why did this happen? What lead to such pain and suffering? In my own desperate search, I came to understand what the Muslim culture and faith is and isn’t.

I understand why there are so many refugees. I understand what these refugees have lost. I know why they are fleeing their countries. I feel their despair.

Donald Trump is no doubt a New Yorker. I’m sure he suffered and lost equally on 9/11. How is it that he has forgotten what it is to be an American and a New Yorker so soon?

For the entire article and audio interview: http://www.kqed.org/a/perspectives/R201512140643

Light a Candle

Muslim groups raise $134K for San Bernardino shooting victims, families
Muslims United for San Bernardino was launched one day after the terrorist attack that left 14 dead in California

12/9/15 By Michael Walsh – yahoonews

Muslim-American groups have come together to raise nearly $135,000 for the families of the 14 killed and 21 wounded in the terrorist attack in San Bernardino, Calif.

Faisal Qazi, a neurologist and president of the MiNDS Network, launched the local fundraising campaign, Muslims United for San Bernardino, one day after the tragedy at the Inland Regional Center, a facility for people with developmental disabilities.

It was intended as a local campaign for Muslim-Americans in Southern California until Tarek El-Messidi, founder of the nonprofit CelebrateMercy, reached out to Qazi and suggested broadening the scope to a national level.

“We care for this country. We love this country. While no amount of money will bring back victims’ loved ones for their families, we hope this will alleviate some of the financial burden for these families,” El-Messidi said in an interview with Yahoo News.

El-Messidi, who has experience with countrywide campaigns, secured promotions and endorsements from major Muslim organizations throughout the United States, including Zaytuna College and Mental Health 4 Muslims.

Within 48 hours, the campaign on LaunchGood, a crowdfunding platform focused on Muslims throughout the world, reached its initial goal of $50,000, so the organizers raised the bar to $140,000.

In the wake of the tragedy, El-Messidi said, many Muslims were frustrated and scared that some people were lumping them together with extremists.

Perhaps the most public indication of this was Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s call to ban all Muslims from entering the United States until “our country’s representatives can figure out what is going on.” The proposal has garnered both domestic and international ridicule, and several prominent scholars challenged it on constitutional grounds.

El-Messidi lamented what he considers the unfair and inaccurate representation of most Muslim-Americans as violent and treasonous in parts of the news media.

“The truth is far from that. Muslims make about 1 percent of America,” El-Messidi said. “We are actively contributing to America and helping to build society. This campaign is one example of how American Muslims are trying to build and not destroy.”

For more: http://news.yahoo.com/muslim-groups-raise–118k-for-san-bernardino-shooting-victims–families-180929608.html

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” It is our responsibility to reject religious tests on who we admit into this country.  It’s our responsibility to reject proposals that Muslim Americans should somehow be treated differently.  Because when we travel down that road, we lose.  That kind of divisiveness, that betrayal of our values plays into the hands of groups like ISIL.  Muslim Americans are our friends and our neighbors, our co-workers, our sports heroes — and, yes, they are our men and women in uniform who are willing to die in defense of our country.  We have to remember that. “

12/6/15 President Obama 

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 “There are millions of patriotic Muslims in America right now that are outstanding members of their community, that are serving in the United States military, that are teachers, that are coworkers, that are neighbors, that are friends. “

12/7/15 White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest
White House Press Briefing, James S. Brady Briefing Room, White House

.

‘The Trump campaign has had for months now a dustbin-of-history-like quality to it, from the vacuious sloganeering to the out right lies to even the fake hair, the whole carnival barker routine that we’ve seen for some time now. The question now is about the rest of the Republican party and whether they are going to be dragged into the dustbin with him. And right now the current trajectory is not good.

Earlier this year, the House Republicans elected to their leadership, somebody [House Rep. Steve Scalise (R)] who famously bragged to a reporter that ‘he is David Duke without the baggage’. Earlier this month we saw the Executive Director of the Senate Republican Campaign Committee [Ward Baker (R)] was advising candidates about how they could ride the Trump Wave. And just today  -today- the new Speaker of the House [Paul Ryan (R)] said that he would vote for Donald Trump if he is the party’s nominee. Now I know that each of the Republican candidates has taken an oath to support Donald Trump for President to the United States if he wins the nomination. But the fact is the first thing a President does when he or she takes the oath of office is to swear an oath to preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States and the fact is the what Donald Trump said yesterday disqualifies him from serving as President. And for Republican candidates to stand by their pledge to support Mr. Trump as President that in and of it’s self is disqualifying”

12/8/2015 White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest in response to
GOP Presidential Frontrunner Donald Trump’s plans to ban Muslims from entering the USA

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HRC on Trump banning Muslims

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DNC 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidates’ Debate – Iowa

Proud to be a Democrat
The Democratic National Party
For more than 200 years, our party has led the fight for civil rights, health care, Social Security, workers’ rights, and women’s rights.

We are the party of Barack Obama, John F. Kennedy, FDR, and the countless everyday Americans who work each day to build a more perfect union.

1920’s 

19TH AMENDMENT: WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE

Under the leadership of Democratic President Woodrow Wilson, the U.S. Constitution was amended to grant women the right to vote. In August of 1920, Tennessee’s became the 36th state to ratify women’s suffrage, and it became our nation’s 19th amendment.

1930’s 

Americans turned to Democrats and elected President Franklin D. Roosevelt to end the Great Depression. President Roosevelt offered Americans a New Deal that put people back to work, stabilized farm prices, and brought electricity to rural homes and communities. Under President Roosevelt, Social Security established a promise that lasts to this day: growing old would never again mean growing poor.

SOCIAL SECURITY ACT – One of the most enduring parts of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal, the Social Security Act provides assistance to retirees, the unemployed, widows, and orphans. By signing this act, Franklin D. Roosevelt was the first president to advocate for federal assistance for the elderly. It was largely opposed by Republican legislators.

1940’s 

In 1944, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the G.I. Bill—a historic measure that provided unprecedented benefits for soldiers returning from World War II, including low-cost mortgages, loans to start a business, and tuition and living expenses for those seeking higher education. Harry Truman helped rebuild Europe after World War II with the Marshall Plan and oversaw the formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. By integrating the military, President Truman helped to bring down barriers of race and gender and pave the way the way for civil rights advancements in the years that followed.

In the 1960s, Americans again turned to Democrats and elected President John F. Kennedy to tackle the challenges of a new era. President Kennedy dared Americans to put a man on the moon, created the Peace Corps, and negotiated a treaty banning atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons.

And after President Kennedy’s assassination, Americans looked to President Lyndon Johnson, who offered a new vision of a Great Society and signed into law the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act.

1960’s 

 CIVIL RIGHTS ACT – This landmark piece of legislation outlawed major forms of discrimination against African Americans and women and prohibited racial segregation. Signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, it ended unequal voting requirements and segregated schools, workplaces, and public facilities.

President Johnson’s enactment of Medicare was a watershed moment in America’s history that redefined our country’s commitment to our seniors—offering a new promise that all Americans have the right to a healthy retirement.

1970’s 

In 1976, in the wake of the Watergate scandal, Americans elected Jimmy Carter to restore dignity to the White House. He created the Departments of Education and Energy and helped to forge a lasting peace between Israel and Egypt.

1990’s

In 1992, after 12 years of Republican presidents, record budget deficits, and high unemployment, Americans turned to Democrats once again and elected Bill Clinton to get America moving again. President Clinton balanced the budget, helped the economy add 23 million new jobs, and oversaw the longest period of peacetime economic expansion in history.
21st century

21st Century

In 2008, Americans turned to Democrats and elected President Obama to reverse our country’s slide into the largest economic downturn since the Great Depression and undo eight years of policies that favored the few over the many.

Under President Obama’s direction and congressional Democrats’ leadership, we’ve reformed a health care system that was broken and extended health insurance to 32 million Americans.

.PATIENT PROTECTION AND AFFORDABLE CARE ACT –  After decades of trying and despite unanimous opposition from Republicans, President Obama and Democrats passed comprehensive health reform into law in March 2010. The Affordable Care Act will hold insurance companies accountable, lower costs, expand coverage, and improve care for all Americans.

We’ve reined in a financial system that was out of control and delivered the toughest consumer protections ever enacted.

We’ve reworked our student loan system to make higher education more affordable.

We passed the Recovery Act, which created or helped to save millions of jobs and made unprecedented investments in the major pillars of our country.

From America’s beginnings to today, people have turned to Democrats to meet our country’s most pressing challenges—and pave the way for a future that lifts up all Americans.

Democratic Party – ISSUES
Civil Rights
Education
Energy Independence
Environment
Health Care
Immigration Reform
Jobs and the Economy
National Security
Open Government
Retirement Security
Science and Technology
Voting Rights

.

2016 Presidential Democratic Candidates - Oct 2015

2016 Democratic Presidential Candidates’ Debate

Democratic National Committee announced that six debates are scheduled — at a pace of roughly one per month , this will give voters ample opportunities to hear the 2016 Democratic Presidential candidates discuss their visions for our country’s future.

Debates provide a opportunity for our candidates to engage in a rigorous discussion, not only with each other, but also to show the American people where Democrats stand. The Democratic National Committee has scheduled six debates that will highlight the stark differences between Democrats and Republicans, and help ensure that whoever caucus goers and voters choose as the Democratic nominee will become the 45th President of the United States.

What?

Our Democratic candidates are committed to fighting for middle-class families and expanding opportunities to pursue the American Dream, while Republicans continue to push for policies that are out of date and out of touch.

Who?

Hillary Clinton
Martin O’Malley
Bernie Sanders

When?

November 14, 2015  – Drake University, Des Moines, IA

Why?

The choice the American people will face in next November’s election couldn’t be more important. Voters across the country are going to decide between two very different plans for our country — an economy built to last that will strengthen and sustain our middle class, or the failed trickle-down economics of the past. These debates will highlight the Democratic Party’s policies, which will continue to strengthen the middle class, and we hope Americans across the political spectrum will tune in.

Since 1848, the Democratic National Committee has been the home of the Democratic Party, the oldest continuing party in the United States.

Today we are millions of supporters strong, fighting for progress and helping elect Democrats across the country to state government, Congress, and the White House.

There are several core beliefs that tie our party together: Democrats believe that we’re greater together than we are on our own—that this country succeeds when everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules. Our party, led by President Obama, is focused on building an economy that lifts up all Americans, not just those at the top.

That’s why Democrats are working to make progress on issues like job creation, equal pay, education, health care, and clean energy.

For more: http://www.democrats.org/Post/democratic-national-committee-announces-six-primary-debates

.

Democratic Party Presidential Primary 2016 Endorsements
Hillary Clinton
Martin O’Malley
Bernie Sanders

.

Democratic Party
Democratic Party History
Democratic Party Leaders
Democratic Party Organization
Democratic State Parties
DNC Facebook
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DNC Pinerest
DNC Youtube

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2016 Democratic Presidential Candidates’ Debate
November 14, 2015 
9:00 PM ET
Drake University, Sheslow Auditorium, Des Moines, IA
Hosted by CBS/Twitter/Iowa Democratic Party/KCCI/Des Moines Register

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Live Stream: http://www.cbsnews.com/live/

#DemDebate

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Jean Jullien - Peace for Paris
Jean Jullien – Peace for Paris

First in the South Democratic Presidential Candidates Forum

First in the South Dem Pres Candidates Forum2016 Presidential Democratic Candidates - Oct 2015

Democratic Party Presidential Primary 2016 Endorsements
Hillary Clinton
Martin O’Malley
Bernie Sanders

.

First in the South

MSNBC will be live from the South Carolina Democratic Party’s “First in the South Democratic Candidates Forum” at Winthrop University on Friday, Nov. 6.

Coverage will begin at 6 p.m. ET with a special edition of “Hardball” hosted by Chris Matthews with Steve Kornacki live from Winthrop University.

The “First in the South Democratic Candidates Forum” will be moderated by Rachel Maddow and will air live on MSNBC beginning at 8 p.m. ET. Maddow will speak with Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton, Martin O’Malley and Bernie Sanders separately on a variety of topics including the economy, policing in America, the state of the Democratic Party in the South and the 2016 campaign.

Chris Matthews will be joined by Rachel Maddow for post-forum analysis after the main event.

In addition to the forum, S.C. Democratic Party Chair Jaime Harrison and S.C. Rep. Gilda Cobb-Hunter will host events in the afternoon before the forum.

For more: http://www.winthrop.edu/forums/

Proud to be a Democrat
The Democratic National Party
For more than 200 years, our party has led the fight for civil rights, health care, Social Security, workers’ rights, and women’s rights.

We are the party of Barack Obama, John F. Kennedy, FDR, and the countless everyday Americans who work each day to build a more perfect union.

1920’s 

19TH AMENDMENT: WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE

Under the leadership of Democratic President Woodrow Wilson, the U.S. Constitution was amended to grant women the right to vote. In August of 1920, Tennessee’s became the 36th state to ratify women’s suffrage, and it became our nation’s 19th amendment.

1930’s 

Americans turned to Democrats and elected President Franklin D. Roosevelt to end the Great Depression. President Roosevelt offered Americans a New Deal that put people back to work, stabilized farm prices, and brought electricity to rural homes and communities. Under President Roosevelt, Social Security established a promise that lasts to this day: growing old would never again mean growing poor.

SOCIAL SECURITY ACT – One of the most enduring parts of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal, the Social Security Act provides assistance to retirees, the unemployed, widows, and orphans. By signing this act, Franklin D. Roosevelt was the first president to advocate for federal assistance for the elderly. It was largely opposed by Republican legislators.

1940’s 

In 1944, Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the G.I. Bill—a historic measure that provided unprecedented benefits for soldiers returning from World War II, including low-cost mortgages, loans to start a business, and tuition and living expenses for those seeking higher education. Harry Truman helped rebuild Europe after World War II with the Marshall Plan and oversaw the formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. By integrating the military, President Truman helped to bring down barriers of race and gender and pave the way the way for civil rights advancements in the years that followed.

In the 1960s, Americans again turned to Democrats and elected President John F. Kennedy to tackle the challenges of a new era. President Kennedy dared Americans to put a man on the moon, created the Peace Corps, and negotiated a treaty banning atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons.

And after President Kennedy’s assassination, Americans looked to President Lyndon Johnson, who offered a new vision of a Great Society and signed into law the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act.

1960’s 

 CIVIL RIGHTS ACT – This landmark piece of legislation outlawed major forms of discrimination against African Americans and women and prohibited racial segregation. Signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, it ended unequal voting requirements and segregated schools, workplaces, and public facilities.

President Johnson’s enactment of Medicare was a watershed moment in America’s history that redefined our country’s commitment to our seniors—offering a new promise that all Americans have the right to a healthy retirement.

1970’s 

In 1976, in the wake of the Watergate scandal, Americans elected Jimmy Carter to restore dignity to the White House. He created the Departments of Education and Energy and helped to forge a lasting peace between Israel and Egypt.

1990’s

In 1992, after 12 years of Republican presidents, record budget deficits, and high unemployment, Americans turned to Democrats once again and elected Bill Clinton to get America moving again. President Clinton balanced the budget, helped the economy add 23 million new jobs, and oversaw the longest period of peacetime economic expansion in history.
21st century

21st Century

In 2008, Americans turned to Democrats and elected President Obama to reverse our country’s slide into the largest economic downturn since the Great Depression and undo eight years of policies that favored the few over the many.

Under President Obama’s direction and congressional Democrats’ leadership, we’ve reformed a health care system that was broken and extended health insurance to 32 million Americans.

.PATIENT PROTECTION AND AFFORDABLE CARE ACT –  After decades of trying and despite unanimous opposition from Republicans, President Obama and Democrats passed comprehensive health reform into law in March 2010. The Affordable Care Act will hold insurance companies accountable, lower costs, expand coverage, and improve care for all Americans.

We’ve reined in a financial system that was out of control and delivered the toughest consumer protections ever enacted.

We’ve reworked our student loan system to make higher education more affordable.

We passed the Recovery Act, which created or helped to save millions of jobs and made unprecedented investments in the major pillars of our country.

From America’s beginnings to today, people have turned to Democrats to meet our country’s most pressing challenges—and pave the way for a future that lifts up all Americans.

Democratic Party – ISSUES
Civil Rights
Education
Energy Independence
Environment
Health Care
Immigration Reform
Jobs and the Economy
National Security
Open Government
Retirement Security
Science and Technology
Voting Rights

.

Democratic Party
Democratic Party History
Democratic Party Leaders
Democratic Party Organization
Democratic State Parties
DNC Facebook
DNC Twitter
DNC Pinerest
DNC Youtube

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November 6, 2015
8:00 – 10:00 PM ET
First in the South 2016 Democratic Presidential Candidates Forum
Winthrop University’s Winthrop Coliseum, Rock Hill, South Carolina
Moderated by MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow

.

#DemDebate

#MSNBC2016

#FirstintheSouth

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