Heroes: S. Stone, A. Sadler, A. Sharlatos, C. Norman, M. Moogalian & Damien A.

A humble wave from a hero: Wounded US airman who took down AK47-wielding terrorist on French train, then treated others before tending to his own stab wounds emerges from hospital with a smile 

US Air Force Airman 1st Class Spencer Stone emerged from the central hospital in Lille, France, wearing bandages and a sling a day after tackling a terrorist down
US Air Force Airman 1st Class Spencer Stone emerged from the central hospital in Lille, France, wearing bandages and a sling a day after tackling a terrorist down
  • Air Force airman Spencer Stone ran at 26-year-old Moroccan when he opened fire on high speed service to Paris
  • He was stabbed in the neck, above his brow, and almost severed his thumb – but still gave First Aid to others
  • Was on the train with friend Oregon National Guard member Alek Skarlatos, 22, who was travelling through Europe
  • With the help of Anthony Sadler, from California, and British national Chris Norman, they stopped the attack
  • Three people, including Stone, wounded in the attack and French police have hailed the bravery of the bystanders
  • French media report the man denies being a terrorist and instead claims he wanted to carry out an armed robbery 
  • Also claims he wanted to ransom off passengers and he found the weapons in a bag ‘by chance in a Brussels Park’

The US airman who was stabbed in the neck and hand while tackling a Kalashnikov-wielding terrorist to the ground in a packed Paris-bound train has emerged from hospital with a humble wave.

He became a hero while traveling on a high speed train from Amsterdam to France with his two friends – Oregon National Guard member Alek Skarlatos, 22, who was on leave after a tour of Afghanistan, and Anthony Sadler of California – when they ambushed a terrorist and averted a tragedy.

Having already been suspicious of Ayoub el-Qahzzani’s behavior, Stone leaped into action when he heard him load up a Kalashnikov in the toilet. When he came out to open fire, Stone, Skarlatos and Sadler charged and tackled him to the ground.

Stone was stabbed in the hand during the scuffle with a Klashnikov and Stanley knife on Friday – almost severing his thumb – but was hailed a hero as he disarmed the suspect then administered first aid to others before caring for himself.

On Saturday, he emerged from the central hospital in Lille, France, wearing bandages and a sling – and offered the cameras a humble wave before slipping into a black sedan with diplomatic license plates.

It was not immediately clear where he was headed.

Stone, who is in the Air Force, was also commended for helping an injured train passenger, a French-American, bleeding from a gunshot wound. That passenger, a teacher who resides outside Paris, was being treated in another hospital in Lille.

French President Francois Hollande said in a statement that he spoke with President Barack Obama to personally thank him for the ‘exemplary conduct of American citizens who stopped an extremely serious attack.’

Earlier on Saturday, Stone’s friend Sadler described the sequence of events.

‘We heard a gunshot, and we heard glass breaking behind us, and saw a train employee sprint past us down the aisle,’ Sadler said from France. They then saw a gunman entering the train car with an automatic rifle.

‘As he was cocking it to shoot it, Alek just yells, ‘Spencer, go!’ And Spencer runs down the aisle,’ Sadler continued. ‘Spencer makes first contact, he tackles the guy, Alek wrestles gun away from him, and the gunman pulls out a box cutter and slices Spencer a few times. And the three of us beat him until he was unconscious.’

As they beat the man – named in reports as Ayoub el-Qahzzani – he pleaded with them to return his AK-47, Sadler explained.

‘He was just telling us to give back his gun. ‘Give me back my gun! Give me back my gun!’ But we just carried on beating him up and immobilised him and that was it.’

The men, along with fellow passenger British IT consultant Chris Norman, have since been commended for their bravery by President Barack Obama and French President Francois Hollande has tweeted that he will meet the men tomorrow to thank them.

(From left to right) Anthony Sadler, from Pittsburg, California, Oregon Army National Guard Spec Alek Sharlatos from Roseburg, Oregon, and Chris Norman, a British man living in France thwarted the attacker while on the train. They are pictured with medals they received for bravery
(From left to right) Anthony Sadler, from Pittsburg, California, Oregon Army National Guard Spec Alek Sharlatos from Roseburg, Oregon, and Chris Norman, a British man living in France thwarted the attacker while on the train. They are pictured with medals they received for bravery

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3207243/True-American-hero-airman-tackled-beat-disarmed-Kalashnikov-wielding-terrorist-French-train-treated-tending-stab-wounds-emerges-hospital-humble-wave.html

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Mark Moogalian, first heroic passenger to wrestle a weapon from the high-speed train gunman
Mark Moogalian, first heroic passenger to wrestle a weapon from the high-speed train gunman

Revealed: The mystery man who tackled AK-47 assault rifle from train gunman

Traveller who intervened to disarm gunman youb El-Khazzani is an American academic named Mark Moogalian

Mr Moogalian, who lives in Paris but is originally from Midlothian, Virginia, US, is the previously unnamed man who came to the aid of “Damien A”, 28, a French banker who confronted El-Khazzani.

The academic acted instinctively to protect his wife Isabella Risacher, who was also aboard the Thalys train.

He tackled the Kalashnikov assault rifle off El-Khazzani, who then drew a sidearm and shot him in the neck before taking back the rifle, his sister has revealed.

Three other US citizens including two military personnel, and Chris Norman, a British businessman then stepped in to disarm and overpower the assailant.

For more: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/france/11819423/Revealed-The-mystery-man-who-tackled-AK-47-assault-rifle-from-train-gunman.html

Defense Officials Praise Troops’ Actions in Train Attack

WASHINGTON, August 22, 2015 — Defense.gov

In a statement released today, Defense Secretary Ash Carter praised three Americans for their actions yesterday on a train outside of Brussels, Belgium.

“On behalf of all the men and women of the Department of Defense, I want to thank the brave individuals, including two members of the U.S. military, who stepped forward to prevent an even greater tragedy from taking place aboard that train,” Carter said.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Spencer Stone, assigned to the 65th Air Base Group, Lajes Air Base, Azores, Oregon Army National Guard Spc. Alek Skarlatos and a civilian friend were traveling together via train on personal leave. The men took immediate action to subdue an armed gunman before he could engage his automatic weapon on the train.

“My thoughts and prayers today are with those injured in the attack, including Airman 1st Class Spencer Stone, whose selfless actions saved lives. I wish him a speedy recovery,” the defense secretary said.

“These men are heroes,” said U.S. European Command Commander Air Force Gen. Philip M. Breedlove.

“Actions like this clearly illustrate the courage and commitment our young men and women have all the time, whether they are on duty or on leave,” he said. “We are extremely proud of their efforts and now are praying for our injured airman to have a speedy recovery.”

Stone, who suffered non-life threatening injuries in the attack, is currently being treated in a French medical facility.

“(Stone and Skarlatos) are two reasons why — on duty and off — ours is finest fighting force the world has ever known,” Carter said.

“I’m still waiting to wake up,” he said. “It’s like a movie scene or something.”

“I was thinking about survival,” said Spencer Stone, who serves in the Air Force. “It was to survive and for everybody else on the train to make it.”

“He seemed like he was ready to fight until the end,” Stone added of Ayoub El Khazzani, 26, the alleged attacker. “So were we.”

“His intentions were very clear,” said Alek Skarlatos, a National Guardsman. “The guy had a lot of ammo. In the beginning it was gut instinct, survival.”

Khazzani allegedly opened fire on board a train heading from Amsterdam to Paris on Friday before being subdued by Sadler, Skarlatos and Stone.

Three passengers were injured in the incident, sustaining knife or gunshot wounds, none of them life-threatening.

Stone had his neck and thumb caught when he and his two close friends rushed Khazzani and prevented further bloodshed.

“Other than my finger, I didn’t really feel any of my other injuries,” he said on Sunday. “I trust my friends very much. If it wasn’t for them, I’d be dead.”

“He clearly had no firearms training whatsoever,” Skarlatos said of Khazzani. “I have no idea where he was aiming.”

French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve said on Saturday that the accused assailant wielded a Kalashnikov assault rifle, a Luger automatic pistol and a box cutter during the attack.

Sadler argued on Sunday that the international community must remain both vigilant and brave in the face of similar extremism.

“Please do something,” he said. “Don’t just stand there and watch.”

For more: http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/251760-train-attack-hero-it-was-do-something-or-die

From the left, French President Francois Hollande, U.S. National Guardsman from Roseburg, Oregon, Alek Skarlatos, U.S. Ambassador to France Jane D. Hartley, U.S. Airman Spencer Stone and Anthony Sadler, a senior at Sacramento University in California, pose for photographers as they leave the Elysee Palace in Paris, France, after being awarded with the French Legion of Honor by French President Hollande, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015. French President Hollande and a bevy of officials are presenting the Americans with the prestigious Legion of Honor on Monday. The three American travelers say they relied on gut instinct and a close bond forged over years of friendship as they took down a heavily armed man on a passenger train speeding through Belgium. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)
From L, French President Francois Hollande, U.S. National Guardsman from Roseburg, Oregon, Alek Skarlatos, U.S. Ambassador to France Jane D. Hartley, U.S. Airman and Anthony Sadler, a senior at Sacramento University in California was awarded with the French Legion of Honor by French President Hollande, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

US National Heritage Areas

Preserve Natl Heritage Areas

National Heritage Areas Map
National Heritage Areas Map

A National Heritage Area is a site designated by United States and intended to encourage historic preservation of the area and an appreciation of the history and heritage of the site. There are currently 49 National Heritage Areas, some of which use variations of the title, such as National Heritage Corridor.

National Heritage Areas (NHA) are not National Park Service units or federally owned or managed land. National Heritage Areas are administered by state governments or non-profit organizations or other private corporations. The National Park Service provides an advisory role and limited technical, planning and financial assistance.

NHAs are created by Congress. Each area has its own authorizing legislation and a set of unique resources and goals. Areas considered for designation must have specific elements. First, the landscape must be a nationally unique natural, cultural, historic, or scenic resource. Second, when the related sites are linked, they must tell a unique story about the U.S.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Heritage_Area

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What are National Heritage Areas?

National Heritage Areas (NHAs) are designated by Congress as places where natural, cultural, and historic resources combine to form a cohesive, nationally important landscape. Through their resources,NHAs tell nationally important stories that celebrate our nation’s diverse heritage. NHAs are lived-in landscapes. Consequently, NHA entities collaborate with communities to determine how to make heritage relevant to local interests and needs.

NHAs are a grassroots, community-driven approach to heritage conservation and economic development. Through public-private partnerships, NHA entities support historic preservation, natural resource conservation, recreation, heritage tourism, and educational projects. Leveraging funds and long-term support for projects, NHA partnerships foster pride of place and an enduring stewardship ethic.

The National Heritage Area Program

NHAs further the mission of the National Park Service (NPS) by fostering community stewardship of our nation’s heritage. The NHA program, which currently includes 49 heritage areas, is administered by NPS coordinators in Washington DC and six regional offices – Anchorage, Oakland, Denver, Omaha, Philadelphia, and Atlanta – as well as park unit staff.

NHAs are not national park units. Rather, NPS partners with, provides technical assistance, and distributes matching federal funds from Congress to NHA entities. NPS does not assume ownership of land inside heritage areas or impose land use controls.

FAQs

How do National Heritage Areas work?

National Heritage Areas (NHA) expand on traditional approaches to resource stewardship by supporting large-scale, community driven initiatives that connect local citizens to the preservation and planning process. 

What is the role of the National Park Service?

The National Park Service (NPS) provides technical, planning and limited financial assistance to National Heritage Areas. The NPS is a partner and advisor, leaving decision-making authority in the hands of local people and organizations. 

The National heritage Areas staff at NPS headquarters are available to help answer any questions about the program. 

How is it different from a National Park?

A National Heritage Area is not a unit of the National Park Service, nor is any land owned or managed by the NPS. National Park Service involvement is always advisory in nature.

For more: http://www.nps.gov/heritageareas/FAQ/

Heritage & Historic Preservation – NPS Facebook
Heritage & Historic Preservation – NPS Twitter

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World Humanitarian Day 2015

World Humanitarian Day 2015

World Humanitarian Day is a day dedicated to recognize humanitarian personnel and those who have lost their lives working for humanitarian causes. It was designated by the United Nations General Assembly as part of a Swedish-sponsored GA Resolution A/63/L.49 on the Strengthening of the Coordination of Emergency Assistance of the United Nations, and set as 19 August. It marks the day on which the then Special Representative of the Secretary-General to Iraq, Sérgio Vieira de Mello and 21 of his colleagues were killed in the bombing of the UN Headquarters in Baghdad.

History

The designation of 19 August as World Humanitarian Day is the outcome of the relentless efforts of the Sérgio Vieira de Mello Foundation and his family working closely with the Ambassadors of France, Switzerland, Japan and Brazil in both Geneva and New York to table and steer the draft Resolution through the General Assembly. The Foundation conveyed its deep gratitude to the United Nations General Assembly and all Member States for the worthy gesture of recognition that has ensured that the tragic loss of Vieira de Mello and his 21 colleagues and all humanitarian personnel who have made the ultimate sacrifices in relieving the suffering of victims of humanitarian crises have not been in vain.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Humanitarian_Day

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UN kicks-off global events for World Humanitarian Day as Ban declares ‘each one of us can make a difference’

18 August 2015 un.org

On the eve of World Humanitarian Day, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is drawing attention to the 100 million people affected by natural disasters, conflict, hunger and disease, whose needs are far outstripping the capacity to help them, but he is also reminding the international community that “each one of us can make a difference” and “create a more humane world.”

“On this Day we also celebrate our common humanity,” Mr. Ban said in a message on the Day, which is marked annually on 19 August.

“The families and communities struggling to survive in today’s emergencies do so with resilience and dignity. They need and deserve our renewed commitment to do all we can to provide them with the means for a better future.”

For more: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=51671#.VdPGk7Q61bw

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http://www.worldhumanitarianday.org 

#SHAREHUMANITY

#WorldHumanitarianDay
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19th Amendment – 95th Anniversary Women’s Right to Vote

The  Nineteenth Amendment (Amendment XIX) to the United States Constitution prohibits each state and the federal government from denying any citizen the right to vote based on that citizen’s sex. It was ratified on August 18, 1920.

The Constitution allows the states to determine the qualifications of voters, subject to limitations imposed by later amendments. Until the 1910s, most states disenfranchised women. The amendment was the culmination of the women’s suffrage movement in the United States, which fought at both state and national levels to achieve the vote. It effectively overruled Minor v. Happersett, in which a unanimous Supreme Court ruled that the Fourteenth Amendment did not give women the right to vote.

The Nineteenth Amendment was first introduced in Congress in 1878 by Senator Aaron A. Sargent. Forty-one years later, in 1919, Congress approved the amendment and submitted it to the states for ratification. It was ratified by the requisite number of states a year later, with Tennessee‘s ratification being the final vote needed to add the amendment to the Constitution. In Leser v. Garnett(1922), the Supreme Court rejected claims that the amendment was unconstitutionally adopted.

” The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.

Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.”

For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nineteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution

Women's_Vote

WH COUNCIL ON WOMEN AND GIRLS

* Blog
White House Support
Resources
Data & Fact Sheets

For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/cwg .

US Women’s Rights Movement Timeline 1848 – 2009 (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

Forward For Equality_sml

Justice Dept: Unconstitutional To Ban Homeless From Sleeping Outside

Homeless Family

DOJ Says It’s Unconstitutional To Ban The Homeless From Sleeping Outside

AUGUST 14, 2015 4:29 PM ET CARRIE JOHNSON – NPR

The Justice Department weighs in on an Idaho case, arguing that homeless people should not be charged with crimes for sleeping outdoors when there is not enough housing in their communities.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Many cities with a homeless problem have responded by passing laws that crack down on camping or sleeping in public places. In some places, they’ve effectively criminalized homelessness. Well, now the Obama administration is weighing in, arguing that for those who have no choice, sleeping in public is not a crime. NPR’s Carrie Johnson reports.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Seven homeless people in Boise, Idaho, are suing the city to overturn a ban on camping and sleeping because they’ve been punished under the local ordinances. This month, the U.S. Justice Department decided it wanted to use the Boise case to send this message.

VANITA GUPTA: Making it a crime for people who are homeless to sleep in public places when there’s insufficient shelter space in a city really is a violation of the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition of cruel and unusual punishment.

JOHNSON: Vanita Gupta leads the civil rights unit at Justice. She says handing out tickets and fines for an innocent activity like sleeping in public ties up courts and jails, and advocates say that pushing homeless people into the justice system is counterproductive. That’s because having a criminal record hurts their chances when they apply for housing and jobs. Eric Tars works at the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty. He’s involved in the Boise case too.

ERIC TARS: Most homeless people aren’t criminals, but if you criminalize the simple acts that we all do every day to survive – sleeping, eating, even going to the bathroom – then you make homeless people into criminals, and then you have the criminal justice system dealing with a social problem.

JOHNSON: Tars says the number of ordinances that make it a crime to sleep, sit on the sidewalk or panhandle has gone up by double digits in the past three years. And he says the Justice Department filing in the Boise case could have wide impact since big cities, including Los Angeles, are still figuring out their approach.

TARS: The DOJ’s brief sends a really strong signal to the city of Boise and to communities across the country that homeless people do not lose their constitutional rights when they lose their homes.

For the entire article and audio interview: http://www.npr.org/2015/08/14/432280606/doj-says-its-unconstitutional-to-ban-the-homeless-from-sleeping-outside

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JUSTICE DEPARTMENT FILES BRIEF TO ADDRESS THE CRIMINALIZATION OF HOMELESSNESS

Thursday, August 6, 2015 doj.gov

The Department of Justice filed a statement of interest today arguing that making it a crime for people who are homeless to sleep in public places, when there is insufficient shelter space in a city, unconstitutionally punishes them for being homeless.  The statement of interest was filed in federal district court in Idaho in Bell v. City of Boise et al., a case brought by homeless plaintiffs who were convicted under Boise ordinances that criminalize sleeping or camping in public.

As stated by the Justice Department in its filing, “[i]t should be uncontroversial that punishing conduct that is a universal and unavoidable consequence of being human violates the Eighth Amendment. . .  Sleeping is a life-sustaining activity—i.e., it must occur at some time in some place.  If a person literally has nowhere else to go, then enforcement of the anti-camping ordinance against that person criminalizes her for being homeless.”

“Many homeless individuals are unable to secure shelter space because city shelters are over capacity or inaccessible to people with disabilities,” said Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Vanita Gupta, head of the Civil Rights Division.  “Criminally prosecuting those individuals for something as innocent as sleeping, when they have no safe, legal place to go, violates their constitutional rights.  Moreover, enforcing these ordinances is poor public policy.  Needlessly pushing homeless individuals into the criminal justice system does nothing to break the cycle of poverty or prevent homelessness in the future.  Instead, it imposes further burdens on scarce judicial and correctional resources, and it can have long-lasting and devastating effects on individuals’ lives.”

“No one wants people to sleep on sidewalks or in parks, particularly not our veterans, or young people, or people with mental illness,” said Director Lisa Foster of the Office for Access to Justice.  “But the answer is not to criminalize homelessness.  Instead, we need to work with our local government partners to provide the services people need, including legal services, to obtain permanent and stable housing.”

For more: http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/justice-department-files-brief-address-criminalization-homelessness

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Homelessness Assistance

Who Needs Homelessness Assistance?

More than 1 million persons are served in HUD-supported emergency, transitional and permanent housing programs each year. The total number of persons who experience homelessness may be twice as high. There are four federally defined categories under which individuals and families may qualify as homeless: 1) literally homeless; 2) imminent risk of homelessness; 3) homeless under other Federal statues; and 4) fleeing/attempting to flee domestic violence.

Where Can Individuals Find Assistance?

Individuals looking for assistance can:

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* * * HOMELESS DOES NOT MEAN VOTELESS * * *

Homeless People’s Voting Rights – http://www.nationalhomeless.org/projects/vote/court.html

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End of WWII – 70th Anniversary

Top L: Battle of Wanjialing, Top R: First Battle of El Alamein, Mid L: Battle of Stalingrad, Mid R: German dive bombers over East Front winter 1943-1944, Bottom L: Wilhelm Keitel signing German Instrument of Surrender, Bottom R: Invasion of Lingayen Gulf
Top L: Battle of Wanjialing, Top R: First Battle of El Alamein, Mid L: Battle of Stalingrad, Mid R: German dive bombers over East Front winter 1943-1944, Bottom L: Wilhelm Keitel signing German Instrument of Surrender, Bottom R: Invasion of Lingayen Gulf

World War II, or the Second World War was a global military conflict lasting from 1939 to 1945 which involved most of the world’s nations, including all of the great powers, organised into two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. It was the most widespread war in history, with more than 100 million military personnel mobilised. In a state of “total war“, the major participants placed their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities at the service of the war effort, erasing the distinction between civilian and military resources. Marked by significant action against civilians, including the Holocaust and the only use of nuclear weapons in warfare, it was the deadliest conflict in human history, and it has been estimated that it resulted in fifty million to over seventy million fatalities.

The war is generally accepted to have begun on 1 September 1939, with the invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany and subsequent declarations of war on Germany by France and most of the countries of the British Empire and Commonwealth. China and Japan were already at war by this date, whereas other countries that were not initially involved joined the war later in response to events such as the German invasion of the Soviet Union and the Japanese attacks on the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor and on British overseas colonies, which triggered declarations of war on Japan by the United States, the British Commonwealth, and the Netherlands.

The war ended with the disintegration of the German war effort and the unconditional surrender of the Empire of Japan by 1945. World War II left the political alignment and social structure of the world significantly altered. While the United Nations was established to foster international cooperation and prevent future conflicts, the Soviet Union and the United States emerged as rival superpowers, setting the stage for the Cold War, which would last for the next forty-six years. Meanwhile, the United States’ strong advocacy of the principle of self-determination accelerated decolonization movements in Asia and Africa, while Western Europe began moving toward economic recovery and increased political integration.

The exact date of the war’s end is also not universally agreed upon. It was generally accepted at the time that the war ended with the armistice of 14 August 1945 (V-J Day), rather than the formal surrender of Japan (2 September 1945); it is even claimed in some European histories that it ended on V-E Day (8 May 1945).[citation needed] A peace treaty with Japan was signed in 1951 to formally tie up any loose ends such as compensation to be paid to Allied prisoners of war who had been victims of atrocities. A treaty regarding Germany’s future allowed the reunification of East and West Germany to take place in 1990 and resolved other post-World War II issues.

Belligerents Commanders Casualties and Losses

Allies
Soviet Union (1941-45)
United States (1941-45)
United Kingdom
China (at war 1937-45)
France
Poland
Canada
Australia
New Zealand
South Africa South Africa
Belgium (1940-45)
Netherlands (1940-45)
Yugoslavia (1941-45)
Greece (1940-45)
Norway (1940-45)
and others
Axis and Axis-aligned
Germany
Japan (at war 1937-45)
Italy (1940-43)
Hungary (1940-45)
Romania (1941-44)
Finland (1941-44)
Bulgaria (1941-44)
Independent State of Croatia (1941-45)
Slovakia Slovakia
France Vichy France (1940-44)
Thailand (1941-45)
Manchukuo
and others
Allied leaders
Soviet Union Joseph Stalin
Soviet Union Georgy Zhukov
United States Franklin D. Roosevelt
United States George Marshall
United Kingdom Winston Churchill
United Kingdom Alan Brooke
Republic of China Chiang Kai-shek
Free French Forces Charles de Gaulle
Democratic Federal Yugoslavia Josip Broz Tito
and others
Axis leaders
Nazi Germany Adolf Hitler
Nazi Germany Wilhelm Keitel
Empire of Japan Hirohito
Empire of Japan Hideki Tōjō
Kingdom of Italy (1861–1946) Benito Mussolini
Kingdom of Hungary (1920–1946) Miklós Horthy
Kingdom of Romania Ion Antonescu
France Philippe Pétain
Finland C.G.E. Mannerheim
and others
Military dead:
Over 16,000,000
Civilian dead:
Over 45,000,000
Total dead:
Over 61,000,000 (1937-45)
further details
Military dead:
Over 8,000,000
Civilian dead:
Over 4,000,000
Total dead:
Over 12,000,000 (1937-45)
further details

Military history of the United States during World War II

The Veterans Administration http://www.va.gov/

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http://www.spiritof45.org
Aug 14-16, 2015  http://www.spiritof45.org

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#WWII70    #VJDay70

Social Security Act of 1935 – 80th Anniversary

Soc Sec 80th icon

In the United States, Social Security is primarily the Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) federal program. The original Social Security Act (1935) and the current version of the Act, as amended, encompass several social welfare and social insurance programs. Social Security is funded through payroll taxes called Federal Insurance Contributions Act tax (FICA) and/or Self Employed Contributions Act Tax (SECA). Tax deposits are collected by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and are formally entrusted to the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund, the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund, the Federal Hospital Insurance Trust Fund, or the Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Fund which make up the Social Security Trust Funds. With a few exceptions, all salaried income, up to a specifically determined amount by law (see tax rate table below) has an FICA and/or SECA tax collected on it.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Security_(United_States)

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The Obama Administration’s Agenda on Seniors & Social Security

“To put us on solid ground, we should also find a bipartisan solution to strengthen Social Security for future generations. We must do it without putting at risk current retirees, the most vulnerable, or people with disabilities; without slashing benefits for future generations; and without subjecting Americans’ guaranteed retirement income to the whims of the stock market.”

-PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA IN THE STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS, JANUARY 25, 2011
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Social Security Timeline: http://www.ssa.gov/history/1930.html

Learn more about Social Security: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/

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