President Obama’s TechHire Initiative

Creating Pathways to Better, High-Paying Tech Jobs and Meeting Urgent Employer Demand Across the U.S.

TechHire is a bold multi-sector initiative and call to action to empower Americans with the skills they need, through universities and community colleges but also nontraditional approaches like “coding boot camps,” and high-quality online courses that can rapidly train workers for a well-paying job, often in just a few months. Employers across the United States are in critical need of talent with these skills. Many of these roles do not require a four-year computer science degree. To give Americans the opportunity they deserve, and the skills they need to be competitive in a global economy, we are highlighting TechHire partnerships. Successful partnerships include:
  • Expanded regional employer hiring and paid internships for IT jobs (e.g., coding, web development, project management, cybersecurity) sourced from accelerated training programs based on demonstrated competencies instead of only selecting candidate using standard HR ‘markers’
  • Expand slots, upgrade quality, and diversify participants in accelerated training pipeline – expand local programs like coding boot camps, the best of which have 90 percent job placement rates – to enable more Americans to master the skills required to fill technology jobs and create a strong pipeline of technology talent that local employers demand and will hire that can be ready in months not years
  • Support from locally intermediaries – municipal leadership, workforce development programs and other local resources – that help connect people to jobs based on their skills and job readiness and help employers engage local talent trained in both alternative and traditional programs.

Over twenty forward-leaning communities are committing to take action – working with each other and with national employers – to expand access to tech jobs. To kick off TechHire, 21 regions, with over 120,000 open technology jobs and more than 300 employer partners in need of this workforce, are announcing plans to work together to new ways to recruit and place applicants based on their actual skills and to create more fast track tech training opportunities. The President is challenging other communities across the country to follow their lead.

March 09, 2015

FACT SHEET: President Obama Launches New TechHire Initiative

President Obama Announces Multi-Sector Effort and Call to Action to Give Americans Pathways to Well-Paying Technology Jobs; Makes Available $100 Million in Grants

The President and his Administration are focused on promoting middle class economics to ensure that all Americans can contribute to and benefit from our American resurgence. Part of that effort requires empowering every American with the education and training they need to earn higher wages. Today’s announcement is the latest part of that effort: In his remarks to the National League of Cities, the President will announce his TechHire initiative, including a new campaign to work with communities to get more Americans rapidly trained for well-paying technology jobs.

Middle class economics has driven the President from day one, and it is what has fueled our comeback. On Friday, we learned that our economy created nearly 300,000 new jobs in February. American businesses have now added more than 200,000 jobs a month for the past 12 months, the longest streak of job creation at that pace in 37 years. All told, over the past five years, our businesses have created 12 million new jobs.

While we are seeing an economic resurgence, the President has made clear that there is still work left to do. America has about 5 million open jobs today, more than at any point since 2001. Over half a million of those job openings are in information technology fields like software development, network administration, and cybersecurity- many of which did not even exist just a decade ago. The average salary in a job that requires information technology (IT) skills – whether in manufacturing, advertising, retail or banking – is 50 percent higher than the average private-sector American job. Helping more Americans train and connect to these jobs is a key element of the President’s middle-class economics agenda.

As part of that agenda, TechHire is a bold multi-sector effort and call to action to empower Americans with the skills they need, through universities and community colleges but also nontraditional approaches like “coding bootcamps,” and high-quality online courses that can rapidly train workers for a well-paying job, often in just a few months. Employers across the United States are in critical need of talent with these skills. Many of these programs do not require a four-year degree.

For more:

Learn more about TechHire at and bring it to your community.

WH Science, Tech & Innovation


Let Girls Learn

Let Girls Learn - No Exceptions

Around the world 62 million girls are not in school. Millions more are fighting to stay there. Let Girls Learn is a new effort by the United States Government, and led by USAID, to provide the public with meaningful ways to help all girls to get a quality education. In support of the effort, USAID also announced over $230 million for new programs to support education around the world.  Then, even if they can reach a school, they may not have the trained teachers, adequate materials, or support they need to learn to read, write, and do basic math. Recent events in Nigeria focused the world’s concern on their plight. It’s time to Let Girls Learn.

Let Girls Learn is an effort by the United States Government to provide the public with meaningful ways to help all girls to get a quality education. It is led by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the lead U.S. Government Agency working to end extreme poverty and promote resilient, democratic societies. In support of the effort, USAID also announced $231.6 million for new programs to support primary and secondary education and safe learning in Nigeria, Afghanistan, South Sudan, and Jordan, as well as support for Guatemala’s ongoing, successful efforts to improve quality of education for under-served populations.


When girls are educated, their families are healthier and they have more opportunities to generate income in adulthood. An educated girl has a ripple effect:

On Her Family:

  • One more year of education increases a woman’s income by up to 25 percent.
  • A girl who has a basic education is three times less likely to contract HIV.
  • Children born to educated mothers are twice as likely to survive past the age of 5.

On Society:

  • If all women in sub-Saharan Africa had a secondary education, 1.8 million lives would be saved each year.
  • Simulations using data from women farmers in Kenya suggest that crop yields could increase by 25 percent if all that country’s girls attended primary school.
  • After looking at 100 countries, the World Bank found that increasing the share of women with a secondary education by 1 percent boosts annual per capita income growth by 0.3 percentage points.
  • Countries where women hold more than 30 percent of seats in political bodies are more inclusive, egalitarian and democratic.


Learn what organizations around the world are doing
to help girls learn and how you can help .


An educated girl has a ripple effect. Explore how giving a girl the tools to learn can
impact families, communities, and the world – for generations.


Tell us about the creative and inspiring ways you are working to help educate

girls on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter: #LetGirlsLearn


FACT SHEET: President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama Announce New Whole of Government Initiative, Let Girls Learn

Today, the Obama Administration announced that it is expanding its efforts to help adolescent girls worldwide attend and complete school through an initiative called Let Girls Learn.

This new effort will build on investments we have made and successes we have achieved in global primary school education, and expand them to help adolescent girls complete their education and pursue their broader aspirations.


Through Let Girls Learn, agencies across the U.S. Government will work together to address the range of challenges confronting adolescent girls around the world. Agencies will increase efforts to build strategic partnerships and enhance diplomatic efforts that will help adolescent girls succeed. This initiative will build upon the broad portfolio of existing programs across the government, all aimed at addressing the complex and varied barriers preventing adolescent girls from attending and completing school, and from realizing their potential as adults. These include programs that address: education; empowerment/leadership; health and nutrition; preventing gender-based violence; preventing child, early and forced marriage; and partnerships with bilateral and multi-lateral partners. Below is a selection of existing programing.

Education Programs

  • The Empowering Adolescent Girls to Lead through Education (EAGLE) project
  • In Liberia, USAID works to support over 7,000 young and adolescent-aged girls through primary school enrollment, attendance, and retention in 60 primary schools
  • USAID’s Girls Empowerment through Education and Health Activity (ASPIRE)
  • USAID/Jordan provides training and materials to supervisors and teachers
  • In El Salvador, the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) is investing $100.7 million to improve the quality of education and skills development
  • In Georgia, MCC is investing $122.5 million to improve the quality of education in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields
  • USAID, in collaboration with the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) Burkle Center, launched a global communications campaign to highlight opportunities for individuals to take action to support girls’ education

For more:


Let Girls Learn Peace Corps initiative

Let Girls Learn: Fact Sheet


Front and Center: Bringing Marginalized Girls into Focus in STEM and CTE Education

White House Council on Women and Girls:

Oct 13, 2015 FACT SHEET: First Lady Michelle Obama Announces New Commitments To The U.S. Government’s Let Girls Learn Initiative


March 2, 2015
President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama
deliver remarks on

helping adolescent girls world wide attend
and stay in school


Pres. Obama Pre-SOTU travel to Michigan, Arizona and Tennessee

PBO Pre-SOTU travelRebuiling the Economy From Middle Class

Riding high on economic growth, Obama hits the road 

01/03/15 By Sarah Muller – msnbc

Riding high on the surge of recent economic growth, President Barack Obama plans to start the new year laying out a mix of executive actions and policy proposals on the economy, teeing up to the highly-anticipated State of the Union Address at the end of the month.

While a new GOP-controlled Congress reconvenes in Washington on Tuesday, the president will hit the road this week to highlight economic progress, building off the strong momentum of the latest GDP numbers which show the fastest U.S. growth in more than a decade. Obama is scheduled to travel to Detroit and Phoenix in the three weeks prior to delivering his State of the Union speech. He’ll also made a joint appearance with Vice President Joe Biden in Tennessee.

According to White House spokesperson Eric Schultz, Obama will address ways to help more Americans become homeowners and get college educations. The president also plans on discussing his plan to create more good-paying jobs.

The push begins Wednesday with the Detroit portion of his trip. While in the Motor City, he’ll focus on the automotive industry’s bounce back from the bailout, which has impacted more than one million jobs. The next day in Phoenix, an area with the housing sector on the mend, he will announce new measures to help more Americans achieve the dream of home-ownership. Obama plans to spotlight during his stop in Tennessee his administration’s efforts to create new manufacturing jobs.

“The President is eager to get to work, and looks forward to working with the new Congress on policies that will make sure middle class Americans are sharing in the economic recovery,” said Schultz. “There are a number of issues we could make progress on, but the President is clear that he will not let this Congress undo important protections gained — particularly in areas of health care, Wall Street reform and the environment.”

For more:



United States of America Annual Gross Domestic Product

Year    U.S. GDP
2005  $13,093,700,000,000
2006  $13,855,900,000,000
2007  $14,477,600,000,000
2008  $14,718,600,000,000
2009  $14,418,700,000,000
2010  $14,964,400,000,000
2011  $15,517,900,000,000
2012  $16,163,200,000,000
2013  $16,768,100,000,000
2014  $17,555,000,000,000


President Obama will travel to Detroit, Phoenix and Knoxville to preview his plans for the US to building on the economic gains of 2014

Wednesday, Jan 7

President Obama delivers remarks on the return of manufacturing jobs and his decision to bail out the auto industry
Ford Motor Company, Wayne, Michigan

Thursday, Jan 8

President Obama delivers remarks on new initiatives he will propose to help Americans buy a home
Central High School, Phoenix, Arizona

Friday, Jan 9

President Obama delivers remarks on new educational opportunity initiatives
Pellissippi State Community College, Knoxville, Tennessee

President Obama delivers remarks on Manufacturing Jobs
Techmer PM, Clinton, Tennessee



President Obama 2014 Year In Review

YEAR IN REVIEW: Creating Economic Opportunity for All Americans in 2014

December 18, 2014

WASHINGTON, DC – President Obama took office in the depths of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.  Six years later, thanks to the grit and determination of the American people, and the decisive actions he took early on – to bring the economy back from the brink, to save the auto industry, and to build a new foundation for middle-class growth – we’ve made real progress.

The economy grew at a combined 4.2% pace in the second and third quarters of this year, the strongest six-month period of growth in more than a decade.  American businesses have added new jobs for 57 consecutive months, the longest streak of private-sector job creation on record, for a total of 10.9 million new jobs. The pickup in the pace of job growth this year has come in industries with higher wages.  And wages across the economy are rising – a very welcome sign for millions of American families.

The U.S. economic recovery took a major step forward in 2014, achieving a number of important milestones:

The President pledged that 2014 would be a year of action and he has spent the last 12 months working with Congress where he could and taking action on his own where needed to revitalize the economy. He also worked closely with leaders from businesses, nonprofits, education, and communities to expand opportunity for more American families. These efforts have helped contribute to economic progress in a number of ways. Some critical efforts include:

Supporting Job Creation Through Manufacturing and Exports

Manufacturing job growth doubled this year – to about 15,000 jobs per month compared to 7,000 jobs per month last year. In total, since February 2010, the United States has directly added 764,000 manufacturing jobs, with the sector expanding employment at its fastest rate in nearly two decades. And the United States’ renewed competitiveness in manufacturing is bringing production back, with 54 percent of U.S.-based manufacturers surveyed by the Boston Consulting Group actively considering bringing production back from China to the United States, up from 37 percent only 18 months prior. The Administration has helped support these efforts by taking steps including:

  • Launching New Hubs as Part of a National Network for Manufacturing Innovation
  • Supporting Efforts to Foster Manufacturing Entrepreneurship and Investment in the United States
  • Growing Our Investments in Advanced Manufacturing Research
  • Another Year of Record-Breaking Exports
    • The Made in Rural America Initiative Leads to a Boost in Small Rural Manufacturing Exports and Other Companies
    • Intensifying and Broadening Our Export Promotion
    • The Advocacy Center at the Department of Commerce Enjoyed a Record-Breaking Year in Helping U.S. Firms Win Contracts Abroad to Create Jobs at Home

Taking Action to Raise the Minimum Wage

Following President Obama’s call on Congress to raise the national minimum wage to $10.10, states, cities and counties, and business leaders have taken action on their own to increase wages across the country. And on February 12, President Obama signed Executive Order 13658, requiring that workers on new Federal contracts be paid $10.10 an hour.

  • 14 States Passed Minimum Wage Increases – and 7 Million Workers Are Set to Benefit From Increases Passed Since the President’s Initial Call in 2013
  • Cities and Counties Have Also Taken Steps to Raise Wages
  • Businesses – Both Large and Small – Are Taking Action
  • President Obama’s Action will Ensure that All Employees of Federal Contractors are Paid at Least $10.10 an HourSupporting Job Skills and Employment Opportunities

Working with Congress, businesses, states and cities and non-profits, the President has taken action to make sure our job-training system is preparing and connecting Americans to the jobs that employers are looking to fill. From an across-the-board review of our job-training system to new grants that support apprenticeships and help connect the long-term unemployed to work, the President and his Administration have used every tool available to train Americans with the skills they need, and connect them with businesses that are looking for skilled workers.

  • Reforming Our Job-Training System to Make It Demand Driven
  • Passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act
  • Getting Long-Term Unemployed Americans Back to Work: President Obama issued a three-part call to action – to employers, to communities across the country, and to federal agencies – to help Americans who are out of work, including the long-term unemployed, find jobs or get the skills they need so they can succeed in the labor force. Since that call to action, long-term unemployment has declined by 1.1 million and progress has been made on all three fronts, including:
    • $170 million in grants awarded in October to programs in 20 states and Puerto Rico to partnerships between non-profits, local government, and employers to train and match long-term unemployed job seekers for in-demand jobs.
    • A new set of best practices for hiring and recruiting the long-term unemployed signed by over 200 businesses – including 80 of the nation’s largest companies – to ensure that these candidates receive a fair shot during the hiring process.
    • Toolkits created by Deloitte Consulting in partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation and with the input of about 100 White House Best Practice signatories to help more employers implement the best practices.
    • Finally, following up on a Presidential Memorandum issued in January, the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) issued guidance to Federal agencies to ensure that individuals who are unemployed or have faced financial difficulties because of circumstances like job loss receive fair treatment and consideration for employment by Federal agencies.
  • $450 Million in Grants to Nearly 270 Community Colleges Partnering with More than 400 Employers Nationally
  • Investing in a Competitive Workforce Through Apprenticeships

Providing High-Quality Education to America’s Students

Ensuring that all Americans are prepared for the jobs of the future and strengthening middle-class security, starts with a strong education system.  The President has taken a number of steps over the past year to expand access to high-quality early childhood education, connect every student to high-speed Internet, and make college more affordable.

  • Committing to Affordable Higher Education
    • Expanding Pay As You Earn (PAYE)
    • The President and First Lady’s Call to Action on College Opportunity
    • Protecting Students from Unaffordable Debts at Career College Programs
  • Committing to Early Education: Throughout 2013 and 2014, the President challenged states, business leaders, and Congress to help more children gain access to the early education they need to succeed in school and in life.  On December 10, 2014, the President convened philanthropists, educators, community leaders and others to announce a collective investment of over $1 billion for early childhood education.  Federal commitments of $750 million will support early learning for over 63,000 children while corporate and philanthropic leaders’ independent commitments of $330 million will expand the reach and enhance the quality for thousands more.
  • ConnectED to the Future:  In June 2013, President Obama visited Mooresville, NC to announce the ConnectED Initiative, which aims to ensure 99% of American students will have access to next-generation broadband in the classroom by 2017, and called for private sector leaders and the FCC To help connect our students. Since that time, the FCC has taken steps to modernize the E-rate program to support high-speed connectivity for America’s schools and libraries, providing a $2 billion down payment and passing a proposal that provides recourses needed to meet the President’s ConnectED goals.  Additionally, private-sector companies have committed more than $2 billion in resources to schools to supplement federal actions and help support cutting-edge technologies across a greater number of schools and homes. On November 19, 2014, The President hosted school leaders and educators to push this effort forward and make all schools “Future Ready”.  More than 1,200 superintendents joined the Administrations Future Ready District Pledge to set a vision for digital learning across America.  Combined, this pledge will already reach 10 million students across 16,000 schools.

For the entire article:



12/23/14 Financial Headlines:

2014 the Year of Action

In his 2014 State of the Union, the President said that 2014 would be a “year of action” to ensure opportunity for all Americans. He’s making good on that promise (despite that Congress did not help, labeling them the ‘Worst Congress ever’.

What does a “year of action” mean, exactly?
The President will continue to work with Congress wherever he can to keep our economy moving forward and creating jobs. But in the meantime, he’s also going to do everything he can on his own to fight for middle-class families every single day.

And he’s been busy. Using his pen and his phone, the President has helped create new manufacturing jobs, expand apprenticeships, and job training, make student loan payments more affordable, support equal pay and workplace flexibility, cut carbon pollution, and rally support across the country while raising the minimum wage for all workers on new federal contracts. And that’s not all.

Here’s an update on the more than 40 actions he’s taken since January to do just that.

Learn more:


List of President Obama’s 2014 Executive Actions to Help Americans – ProPresObama compilation

Pres Obama US - Cuba Relations



White House Summit on Early Childhood Education

First Lady Michelle Obama visits a classroom
First Lady Michelle Obama visits a classroom

Early Learning

Expanding access to high quality early childhood education is among the smartest investments that we can make. Research has shown that the early years in a child’s life—when the human brain is forming—represent a critically important window of opportunity to develop a child’s full potential and shape key academic, social, and cognitive skills that determine a child’s success in school and in life.

Participation in high-quality early learning programs—like Head Start, public and private pre-K, and childcare—will provide children from all backgrounds with a strong start and a foundation for school success. These programs also generate a significant return on investment for society; numerous economic studies have documented a rate of return of $7 or more on each dollar invested through a reduced need for spending on other services, such as remedial education, grade repetition, and special education, as well as increased productivity and earnings for these children as adults.

President Obama’s comprehensive early learning agenda invests in and strengthens early childhood education, care, and development for our nation’s youngest learners. It helps to prevent achievement gaps before they start, and invests from an early age in children as our most critical national resource.

  • Preschool for All
  • Boosting the Quality of Child Care
  • Empowering Parents
  • Raising the Bar for Early Learning
  • Reforming and Expanding Head Start

For more:


White House Announces Summit on Early Education

WASHINGTON, DC – On Wednesday, December 10, President Obama will host a White House Summit on Early Education. The Summit will bring together a broad coalition of philanthropic, business, education, advocacy and elected leaders, as well as other stakeholders who are committed to expanding access to high-quality early education. This summit builds on the President’s call in his 2013 State of the Union address to expand access to high-quality early childhood education to every child in America. As part of that effort, the President proposed a series of new investments that will establish a continuum of high-quality early learning for a child—beginning at birth and continuing to age five. This proposal includes extending and expanding evidence-based, voluntary home visiting, growing the supply of effective early learning opportunities for young children through Early Head Start-Child Care Partnerships, and providing Preschool for All. Since the President’s call to action, more than 30 states and cities have established new programs or expanded access to preschool. Studies show that for every dollar we invest in early childhood education, we see a rate of return of $7 or more through a reduced need for spending on other services, such as remedial education, grade repetition, and special education, as well as increased productivity and earnings for these children as adults.

During the summit, the President will announce the states and communities that will receive $250 million in Preschool Development Grants and $500 million in Early Head Start Child Care Partnership awards to enhance and expand preschool programs and to improve access to high-quality infant and toddler care in high-need communities. In addition to those grant announcements, the President will also highlight new private sector commitments to expand children’s early learning opportunities. Over the last several months, Senior Administration Officials have traveled across the country to hear from local officials, education experts, business leaders, and the philanthropic community about how to best advance the President’s agenda to expand access to high-quality early education for all Americans.



Wednesday, December 10
President Obama hosts a White House Summit on Early Education
White House

Speaking Program:

8:25 AM         Opening Remarks: Valerie Jarrett and Cecilia Muñoz

8:40 AM         Panel 1: Public Investment Leadership to Expand Early Education

11:05 AM       Panel 2: Challenging Leaders to Invest in Early Education

11:50 AM       President Obama Delivers Remarks

1:40 PM         Panel 3: Promoting Quality in Early Education

2:40 PM         Vice President Biden Delivers Closing Remarks



ConnectED to the Future

ConnectED #ConnectED


Preparing America’s students with the skills they need to get good jobs and compete with other countries relies increasingly on interactive, personalized learning experiences driven by new technology. Yet fewer than 30% of America’s schools have the broadband they need to teach using today’s technology. Under ConnectED, however, 99% of American students will have access to next-generation broadband by 2017. That connectivity will help transform the classroom experience for all students, regardless of income.

The President also directed the federal government to make better use of existing funds to get Internet connectivity and educational technology into classrooms, and into the hands of teachers trained on its advantages. And he called on businesses, states, districts, schools, and communities to support this vision, which requires no congressional action. Following the 2014 State of the Union address, the President announced major progress on the initiative, highlighting commitments by the FCC and the private sector.

For more:



Wednesday, November 19, President Obama will host “ConnectED to the Future,” a convening with superintendents, and other educators from across the country, who will lead their schools and districts in the transition to digital learning. The event builds on the momentum of the ConnectED Initiative, a plan the President announced in 2013, to connect 99% of students to high speed internet and empower teachers with the technology they need to transform teaching and learning. An important part of this initiative is ensuring that digital connectivity supports innovation in America’s classrooms. That is why, this fall, the Administration launched the Future Ready Pledge to help school districts develop a culture where teachers harness the power of technology to personalize learning and provide quality digital content that fosters student inquiry and creativity. Through this pledge, superintendents from across the country are committing to lead a transition in their districts to innovative teaching using technology. Signatories will also work in partnership to share best practices with other school districts.  During the event, President Obama will host a digital pledge signing ceremony with over one hundred superintendents to be joined virtually by hundreds more across the country.

Since the President’s call to action in support of the ConnectED Initiative, more than $4 billion in public and private funding has been committed toward expanding high-speed Internet connectivity for America’s schools and libraries.

For more:



Wednesday, November 19th
President Obama hosts  “ConnectED to the Future”
White House


Campaign Against Campus Sex Assault – “It’s On Us” You Are Not Alone

Lone figure on campus

Not Alone – Protecting Students from Sexual Assault
Fact Sheet

One in five women is sexually assaulted while in college.  Most often, it happens her freshman or sophomore year.  In the great majority of cases, it’s by someone she knows – and also most often, she does not report what happened.  And though fewer, men, too, are victimized.

The Administration is committed to putting an end to this violence. That’s why the President established the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault on January 22, 2014, with a mandate to strengthen federal enforcement efforts and provide schools with additional tools to combat sexual assault on their campuses.

Today, the Task Force is announcing a series of actions to: (1)  identify the scope of the problem on college campuses, (2) help prevent campus sexual assault, (3) help schools respond effectively when a student is assaulted, and (4) improve, and make more transparent, the federal government’s enforcement efforts.  We will continue to pursue additional executive or legislative actions in the future.

These steps build on the Administration’s previous work to combat sexual assault.  The Task Force formulated its recommendations after a 90-day review period during which it heard from thousands of people from across the country — via 27 online and in-person listening sessions and written comments from a wide variety of stakeholders.

Helping Schools Identify the Problem: Climate Surveys

As we know, campus sexual assault is chronically underreported – so victim reports don’t provide a fair measure of the problem.  A campus climate survey, however, can.  So, today:

  • We are providing schools with a toolkit for developing and conducting a climate survey.
  • We will explore legislative or administrative options to require colleges and universities to conduct an evidence-based survey in 2016.

Preventing Sexual Assault – and Bringing in the Bystander

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted a systematic review of primary prevention strategies for reducing sexual violence, and is releasing an advance summary of its findings.
  • The CDC and the Justice Department’s Office on Violence Against Women will pilot and evaluate prevention strategies on college campuses.
  • Getting Bystanders to Step In and Help Is a Promising Practice

Helping Schools Respond Effectively When A Student is Sexually Assaulted: Confidentiality, Training, Better Investigations, and Community Partnerships

  • Many survivors need someone to talk to in confidence.
  • We are providing a sample confidentiality and reporting policy.
  • We are providing specialized training for school officials.
  • We will give schools guidance on how to improve their investigative and adjudicative protocols.
  • We are helping schools forge partnerships with community resources.

Improving and Making More Transparent Federal Enforcement Efforts

  • We are launching a dedicated website – – to make enforcement data public and to make other resources accessible to students and schools.
  • The Department of Education is providing more clarity on schools’ legal obligations.
  • The Departments of Justice and Education have entered into an agreement clarifying each agency’s role.

Next Steps
The action steps highlighted in this report are the initial phase of an ongoing plan and commitment to putting an end to this violence on campuses.  We will continue to work toward solutions, clarity, and better coordination. We will review the legal frameworks surrounding sexual assault for possible regulatory or statutory improvements, and seek new resources to enhance enforcement.  Campus law enforcement agencies have special expertise- and they, too, should be tapped to play a more central role.  And we will also consider how our recommendations apply to public elementary and secondary schools – and what more we can do to help there.

For the entire article:

Today, the President announced an initiative to help put an end to campus sexual assault. It’s called “It’s On Us.”

That’s not just a slogan or catchphrase. It’s the whole point. Because in a country where one in five women on college campuses has been sexually assaulted — only 12 percent of which are reported — this is a problem that should be important to every single one of us, and it’s on every single one of us to do something to end the problem.

As a husband, as a brother, and as a father of three boys and daughter who is a sophomore in college, it’s on me to help create an environment in which sexual assault is unacceptable, and where survivors are supported.

It’s on me to tell my kids to never blame the victim. To not be a bystander. It’s on me to make sure they know that if they see something that looks wrong, they need to get involved — to intervene any way they can, even if it means enlisting the help of a friend or resident advisor. It’s on me to teach them to be direct, and to trust their gut.

That’s why this is personal for me.

And it’s why I took a step this morning to show my commitment to doing my part.  And whether you’re a parent, a student, a survivor or a friend of one, there’s something you can do right now to do the same.

Go to It’, and take the pledge — a personal commitment to help keep women and men safe from sexual assault. It’s a promise that you won’t be a bystander to the problem — that you’ll be a part of the solution. The President took the pledge this morning. I did, too — along with dozens of other White House staffers. Do it right now. banner

The White House’s dedicated website – – to make enforcement data public and to make other resources accessible to students and schools.  

On the website, students can learn about their rights, search enforcement data, and read about how to file a complaint.  The website will also help schools and advocates:  it will make available federal guidance on legal obligations, best available evidence and research, and relevant legislation.  Finally, the website will have trustworthy resources from outside the federal government, such as hotline numbers and mental health services locatable by simply typing in a zip code.