U.S. Women’s Rights Movement Timeline 1848 – Jan 2017

ERA Rally

ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™

1848
Jun 12 Women’s Armed Services Integration Act signed into law on by President Harry S. Truman enabled women to serve as permanent, regular members of the armed forces in the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force
1848
Jul 19 – The first women’s rights convention is held in Seneca Falls, New York. After 2 days of discussion and debate, 68 women and 32 men sign a Declaration of Sentiments, which outlines grievances and sets the agenda for the women’s rights movement. A set of 12 resolutions is adopted calling for equal treatment of women and men under the law and voting rights for women.
1850
Oct 23 – The first National Women’s Rights Convention takes place in Worcester, Mass., attracting more than 1,000 participants. National conventions are held yearly (except for 1857) through 1860.
1861 – 1865
400 women find their way to the front of the by disguising themselves as men
1863
Wilmington Insurrection of 1898 – Nov 10, 2,000 armed white men took to the streets of Wilmington, North Carolina and burned the offices of a prominent African-American newspaper, sparking a frenzy of urban warfare that saw dozens of blacks gunned down in the streets.
1865
President Andrew Johnson awarded Ms. Mary Edwards Walker the Congressional Medal of Honor for her “devotion and patriotic zeal to sick and wounded soldiers both in the field and in hospitals to the detriment of her own health.”
1866
Sarah Borginis awarded the title of first female colonel posthumously for the US Army 8th Cavalry at the Jefferson Barracks, Mo. alongside her husband. She both served as a cook and played an active role in fighting.
1869
May – Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton form the National Woman Suffrage Association. The primary goal of the organization is to achieve voting rights for women by means of a Congressional amendment to the Constitution. Nov – Lucy StoneHenry Blackwell, and others form the American Woman Suffrage Association. This group focuses exclusively on gaining voting rights for women through amendments to individual state constitutions. Dec. 10 – The territory of Wyoming passes the first women’s suffrage law. The following year, women begin serving on juries in the territory.
1876
Nell Saunders defeated Rose Harland in the first United States women’s boxing match, receiving a silver butter dish as her prize.
1881
May 21 Clara Barton aided both Union and Confederate soldiers during the Civil War and later went on to found the American Red Cross
1890
The National Woman Suffrage Association and the American Woman Suffrage Association merge to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). As the movement’s mainstream organization, NAWSA wages state-by-state campaigns to obtain voting rights for women.
1893
Colorado is the first state to adopt an amendment granting women the right to vote. Utah and Idaho follow suit in 1896, Washington State in 1910, California in 1911, Oregon, Kansas, and Arizona in 1912, Alaska and Illinois in 1913, Montana and Nevada in 1914, New York in 1917; Michigan, South Dakota, and Oklahoma in 1918.
1894
Oct 17 The first ladies golf tournament was held on the 7-hole Morristown, NJ course
1896
Jul 21 – The National Association of Colored Women is formed, bringing together more than 100 black women’s clubs. Leaders in the black women’s club movement include Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, and Anna Julia Cooper.
1898
Lizzie Arlington became the first woman to sign a professional baseball contract, appearing in her first professional game pitching for the Philadelphia Reserves. Sharpshooter Annie Oakley provided marksmanship training to WWI soldiers.
1900
The Olympics first allowed women. Margaret Abbott won a gold medal in golf; she was the first American woman to take first place in an Olympic event
1901
US Army first began officially accepting women to serve as nurses The role of women in the military did not start to expand beyond medical care until the formation of the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps in 1942.
1903
The Women’s Trade Union League (WTUL) is established to advocate for improved wages and working conditions for women.
1911
Helene Britton was the first woman to own a major league team. She was the head director of the St. Louis Cardinals from 1911 to 1917.
1913
Alice Paul and Lucy Burns form the Congressional Union to work toward the passage of a federal amendment to give women the vote. The group is later renamed the National Women’s Party. Members picket the White House and practice other forms of civil disobedience.
1915
Woman’s suffrage: National American Woman Suffrage Association featured 8,000 marchers, including nine bands, four mounted brigades, 20 floats, and an allegorical performance marched near the Treasury Building in Washington D,C.
1916
Margaret Sanger opens the first U.S. birth-control clinic in Brooklyn, N.Y. Although the clinic is shut down 10 days later and Sanger is arrested, she eventually wins support through the courts and opens another clinic in New York City in 1923.
1917
Jeannette Rankin becomes first U.S. congresswoman
1919
The federal woman suffrage amendment, originally written by Susan B. Anthony and introduced in Congress in 1878, is passed by the House of Representatives and the Senate. It is then sent to the states for ratification.
1920
The Women’s Bureau of the Department of Labor is formed to collect information about women in the workforce and safeguard good working conditions for women.Aug. 18 The 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote, is signed into law by Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby.
1921
Margaret Sanger founds the American Birth Control League, which evolves into the Planned Parenthood Federation of America in 1942.
1922
The Cable Act of 1922 (ch. 411, 42 Stat. 1021, “Married Women’s Independent Nationality Act”) was a United States federal law that reversed former immigration laws regarding marriage.
1926
The Amateur Athletic Union sponsored the first-ever national women’s basketball championship.
1930s
Hollywood starlet Hedy Lamarr’s invented a method of radio “frequency hopping” technology is still in use today by the US defense communication satellite system and is employed by modern cell phone companies to ensure cellular access to hundreds of thousands of calls at one time.
1935
Mary McLeod Bethune organizes the National Council of Negro Women, a coalition of black women’s groups that lobbies against job discrimination, racism, and sexism.
1936
The federal law prohibiting the dissemination of contraceptive information through the mail is modified and birth control information is no longer classified as obscene. Throughout the 1940s and 50s, birth control advocates are engaged in numerous legal suits. The Cable Act of 1922 was repealed.
1940
Margaret Chase Smith was the first woman to be elected to the House and Senate
1942 – 1944
The Women Airforce Service Pilots were civilian pilots who flew more than 12,000 missions between ferring warplanes to bases and embarkation points
1948
June 12 The Women’s Armed Services Integration Act was signed into law granting women the right to serve as permanent members of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force
1955
The Daughters of Bilitis (DOB), the first lesbian organization in the United States, is founded. Although DOB originated as a social group, it later developed into a political organization to win basic acceptance for lesbians in the United States.
1960
The Food and Drug Administration approves birth control pills.
1961
President John Kennedy‘s Executive Order 10925 establishes the President’s Commission on the Status of Women and appoints Eleanor Roosevelt as chairwoman. The report issued by the Commission in 1963 documents substantial discrimination against women in the workplace and makes specific recommendations for improvement, including fair hiring practices, paid maternity leave, and affordable child care.
1963
Betty Friedan publishes her highly influential book The Feminine Mystique, which describes the dissatisfaction felt by middle-class American housewives with the narrow role imposed on them by society. The book becomes a best-seller and galvanizes the modern women’s rights movement.
June 10 Congress passes the Equal Pay Act, making it illegal for employers to pay a woman less than what a man would receive for the same job.
1964
Title VII of the Civil Rights Act bars discrimination in employment on the basis of race and sex. At the same time it establishes the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to investigate complaints and impose penalties.
1965
In Griswold v. Connecticut, the Supreme Court strikes down the one remaining state law prohibiting the use of contraceptives by married couples.
1966
The National Organization for Women (NOW) is founded by a group of feminists including Betty Friedan. The largest women’s rights group in the U.S., NOW seeks to end sexual discrimination, especially in the workplace, by means of legislative lobbying, litigation, and public demonstrations.
1967
Executive Order 11375 expands President Lyndon Johnson’s affirmative action policy of 1965 to cover discrimination based on gender. As a result, federal agencies and contractors must take active measures to ensure that women as well as minorities enjoy the same educational and employment opportunities as white males.
1968
The EEOC rules that sex-segregated help wanted ads in newspapers are illegal. This ruling is upheld in 1973 by the Supreme Court, opening the way for women to apply for higher-paying jobs hitherto open only to men. Feb. 1 Elizabeth Matthew Lewis became the first woman to teach at West Point as a fine arts librarian
1969
California becomes the first state to adopt a “no fault” divorce law, which allows couples to divorce by mutual consent. By 1985 every state has adopted a similar law. Laws are also passed regarding the equal division of common property.
1970
In Schultz v. Wheaton Glass Co., a U.S. Court of Appeals rules that jobs held by men and women need to be “substantially equal” but not “identical” to fall under the protection of the Equal Pay Act. An employer cannot, for example, change the job titles of women workers in order to pay them less than men.
1971
Ms. Magazine is first published as a sample insert in New York magazine; 300,000 copies are sold out in 8 days. The first regular issue is published in July 1972. The magazine becomes the major forum for feminist voices, and cofounder and editor Gloria Steinem is launched as an icon of the modern feminist movement.
1972
Mar. 22 – The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is passed by Congress and sent to the states for ratification. Originally drafted by Alice Paul in 1923, the amendment reads: “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” The amendment died in 1982 when it failed to achieve ratification by a minimum of 38 states.
1972
Mar. 22 Eisenstadt v. Baird the Supreme Court rules that the right to privacy includes an unmarried person’s right to use contraceptives.
1972
Jun 23 Title IX of the Education Amendments bans sex discrimination in schools. It states: “No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any educational program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.” As a result of Title IX, the enrollment of women in athletics programs and professional schools increases dramatically.
1973
As a result of Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court establishes a woman’s right to safe and legal abortion, overriding the anti-abortion laws of many states.
1974
The Equal Credit Opportunity Act prohibits discrimination in consumer credit practices on the basis of sex, race, marital status, religion, national origin, age, or receipt of public assistance. Ella Grasso was the first woman elected governor who was not the wife or widow of a former governor
In Corning Glass Works v. Brennan, the U.S. Supreme Court rules that employers cannot justify paying women lower wages because that is what they traditionally received under the “going market rate.” A wage differential occurring “simply because men would not work at the low rates paid women” is unacceptable.
1976
The first marital rape law is enacted in Nebraska, making it illegal for a husband to rape his wife.
1976
Jul 7 – 119 women enrolled in the Corps of Cadets. Four years later, 62 of those cadets became West Point’s first female graduates.
1978
The Pregnancy Discrimination Act bans employment discrimination against pregnant women. Under the Act, a woman cannot be fired or denied a job or a promotion because she is or may become pregnant, nor can she be forced to take a pregnancy leave if she is willing and able to work.
1984
EMILY’s List (Early Money Is Like Yeast) is established as a financial network for pro-choice Democratic women running for national political office. The organization makes a significant impact on the increasing numbers of women elected to Congress.
1986
Meritor Savings Bank v. Vinson, the Supreme Court finds that sexual harassment is a form of illegal job discrimination.
1990
Dec. 27 Lieutenant Commander Darlene Iskra was the first female naval officer to command a ship at sea; her was The USS Opportune.
1991
FIFA (Fédération Internationale de Football Association) began the Women’s World Cup, which was won by the US Women’s Soccer Team.
1992
In Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the Supreme Court reaffirms the validity of a woman’s right to abortion under Roe v. Wade. The case successfully challenges Pennsylvania’s 1989 Abortion Control Act, which sought to reinstate restrictions previously ruled unconstitutional.
1994
The Violence Against Women Act tightens federal penalties for sex offenders, funds services for victims of rape and domestic violence, and provides for special training of police officers.
1996
In United States v. Virginia, the Supreme Court rules that the all-male Virginia Military School has to admit women in order to continue to receive public funding. It holds that creating a separate, all-female school will not suffice.
1997
Madeleine Albright was the first female secretary of state
1999
The Supreme Court rules in Kolstad v. American Dental Association that a woman can sue for punitive damages for sex discrimination if the anti-discrimination law was violated with malice or indifference to the law, even if that conduct was not especially severe.
2003
In Nevada Department of Human Resources v. Hibbs, the Supreme Court rules that states can be sued in federal court for violations of the Family Leave Medical Act.
2005
In Jackson v. Birmingham Board of Education, the Supreme Court rules that Title IX, which prohibits discrimination based on sex, also inherently prohibits disciplining someone for complaining about sex-based discrimination. It further holds that this is the case even when the person complaining is not among those being discriminated against.
2006
The Supreme Court upholds the ban on the “partial-birth” abortion procedure. The ruling, 5–4, which upholds the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act, a federal law passed in 2003, is the first to ban a specific type of abortion procedure. Writing in the majority opinion, Justice Anthony Kennedy said, “The act expresses respect for the dignity of human life.” Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who dissents, called the decision “alarming” and said it is “so at odds with our jurisprudence” that it “should not have staying power.”
2009
President Obama signed the Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Restoration Act, which allows victims of pay discrimination to file a complaint with the government against their employer within 180 days of their last paycheck. Previously, victims (most often women) were only allowed 180 days from the date of the first unfair paycheck. This Act is named after a former employee of Goodyear who alleged that she was paid 15–40% less than her male counterparts, which was later found to be accurate.
2013
Pres Obama signs the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013Janet Yellen was the first woman to become Chair of the Federal Reserve
2014
Michelle Janine Howard becomes the first First Female Four-Star Admiral
2015
Capt. Kristen Griest  and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver are the first female soldiers to graduate from the U.S. Army’s elite Ranger school,  Full Integration of Women in the Armed Forces, Abby Wambach achieves the highest all-time goal scorer among men and women.
2016
Brigadier General Diana Holland became the first female commandant of cadets at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point,  Tammy Grace Barnett is US Army first female infantry recruitPres Obama designates The Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National MonumentUS Army Approves First Female Officers for Ground Combat, US Treasury announces designs of new  US currency featuring Harriet TubmanMarian Anderson, Eleanor RooseveltLucretia MottSojourner TruthSusan B. AnthonyElizabeth Cady Stanton, and Alice PaulHillary Clinton becomes the first woman to lead a national ticket of a major political party, U.S. Military removes gender specific words from it’s job titles.
2017
Jeanette Epps became the first African-American astronaut to board The International Space Station, 2017 Women’s Marches were a series of political rallies that took place in cities around the world on January 21–22, 2017 [408 marches planned in the U.S. & 168 outside of the U.S.]. The march drew half a million in D.C. alone [making it the largest single day protest in American history]and several million worldwide.
Sources:
InfopleaseWikipedia , USA.gov
.

Following the Footsteps of Women Who Made History

Valerie Jarrett March 28, 2013 10:06 AM EDT

Yesterday, I had the opportunity to speak at the screening of excerpts from an extraordinary new [PBS] documentary,  Makers: Women Who Make America.” College and high school students from all over the Washington, DC area came together to watch the documentary, and hear a panel discussion with two incredible women – former Congresswoman Pat Schroeder, and former President of Brown University, Ruth Simmons – both of whom were also featured in Makers.

Linda Douglass, Senior Vice President for Global Communications for Atlantic Media Company, moderated the panel. Linda is a former broadcast journalist who has covered six presidential campaigns.

The documentary featured interviews and oral histories of extraordinary women who’ve made history – figures such as Gloria Steinem, Hillary Clinton, Oprah Winfrey, and everyday women who have been affected in their lives by the evolution of women’s rights, our culture, and our political climate.

For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/03/28/following-footsteps-women-who-made-history

PBO_Womens_Quote_lrg

White House Council on Women and Girls: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/cwg

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32 thoughts on “U.S. Women’s Rights Movement Timeline 1848 – Jan 2017

  1. WH

    March , 29, 2013

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    10:30 AM
    President Obama departs Joint Base Andrews

    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    12:50 PM
    President Obama arrives in Miami, Florida.

    1:00 PM
    1:20 PM
    President Obama tours a tunnel project at PortMiami in Miami, Florida.

    2:00 PM
    President Obama delivers remarks on the economy
    PortMiami, Miami, Florida

    3:00 PM
    President Obama departs Miami, Florida.

    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    5:15 PM
    President Obama arrives at Joint Base Andrew

    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  2. Rosie the Riveter

    Women’s Rights Movement in the U.S.

    1848
    The first women’s rights convention is held in Seneca Falls, New York.

    1850
    The first National Women’s Rights Convention takes place in Worcester, Mass., attracting more than 1,000 participants. National conventions are held yearly (except for 1857) through 1860.

    1869

    May
    Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton form the National Woman Suffrage Association.

    Nov.
    Lucy Stone, Henry Blackwell, and others form the American Woman Suffrage Association.

    Dec. 10
    The territory of Wyoming passes the first women’s suffrage law.

    1890
    The National Women Suffrage Association and the American Women Suffrage Association merge to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). As the movement’s mainstream organization, NAWSA wages state-by-state campaigns to obtain voting rights for women.

    1893
    Colorado is the first state to adopt an amendment granting women the right to vote. Utah and Idaho follow suit in 1896, Washington State in 1910, California in 1911, Oregon, Kansas, and Arizona in 1912, Alaska and Illinois in 1913, Montana and Nevada in 1914, New York in 1917; Michigan, South Dakota, and Oklahoma in 1918.

    1896
    The National Association of Colored Women is formed, bringing together more than 100 black women’s clubs. Leaders in the black women’s club movement include Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin, Mary Church Terrell, and Anna Julia Cooper.

    1903
    The National Women’s Trade Union League (WTUL) is established to advocate for improved wages and working conditions for women.

    1913
    Alice Paul and Lucy Burns form the Congressional Union to work toward the passage of a federal amendment to give women the vote. The group is later renamed the National Women’s Party. Members picket the White House and practice other forms of civil disobedience.

    1916
    Margaret Sanger opens the first U.S. birth-control clinic in Brooklyn, N.Y. Although the clinic is shut down 10 days later and Sanger is arrested, she eventually wins support through the courts and opens another clinic in New York City in 1923.

    1919
    The federal woman suffrage amendment, originally written by Susan B. Anthony and introduced in Congress in 1878, is passed by the House of Representatives and the Senate. It is then sent to the states for ratification.

    1920
    The Women’s Bureau of the Department of Labor is formed to collect information about women in the workforce and safeguard good working conditions for women.

    Aug. 18
    The 19th Amendment to the Constitution, granting women the right to vote, is signed into law by Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby

    1921
    Margaret Sanger founds the American Birth Control League, which evolves into the Planned Parenthood Federation of America in 1942.

    1935
    Mary McLeod Bethune organizes the National Council of Negro Women, a coalition of black women’s groups that lobbies against job discrimination, racism, and sexism.

    1936
    The federal law prohibiting the dissemination of contraceptive information through the mail is modified and birth control information is no longer classified as obscene.

    1955
    The Daughters of Bilitis (DOB), the first lesbian organization in the United States, is founded.

    1960
    The Food and Drug Administration approves birth control pills.

    1961
    President John Kennedy establishes the President’s Commission on the Status of Women and appoints Eleanor Roosevelt as chairwoman.

    1963
    Betty Friedan publishes her highly influential book The Feminine Mystique.

    June 10
    Congress passes the Equal Pay Act, making it illegal for employers to pay a woman less than what a man would receive for the same job.

    1964
    Title VII of the Civil Rights Act bars discrimination in employment on the basis of race and sex.

    1965
    In Griswold v. Connecticut, the Supreme Court strikes down the one remaining state law prohibiting the use of contraceptives by married couples.

    1966
    The National Organization for Women (NOW) is founded by a group of feminists including Betty Friedan.

    1967
    Executive Order 11375 expands President Lyndon Johnson’s affirmative action policy of 1965 to cover discrimination based on gender.

    1968
    The EEOC rules that sex-segregated help wanted ads in newspapers are illegal. This ruling is upheld in 1973 by the Supreme Court, opening the way for women to apply for higher-paying jobs hitherto open only to men.

    1969
    California becomes the first state to adopt a “no fault” divorce law, which allows couples to divorce by mutual consent. By 1985 every state has adopted a similar law. Laws are also passed regarding the equal division of common property.

    1970
    In Schultz v. Wheaton Glass Co., a U.S. Court of Appeals rules that jobs held by men and women need to be “substantially equal” but not “identical” to fall under the protection of the Equal Pay Act.

    1971
    Ms. Magazine is first published as a sample insert in New York magazine; 300,000 copies are sold out in 8 days. The first regular issue is published in July 1972.

    Mar. 22
    The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is passed by Congress and sent to the states for ratification. Originally drafted by Alice Paul in 1923, the amendment reads: “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” The amendment died in 1982 when it failed to achieve ratification by a minimum of 38 states.

    Also on Mar. 22
    In Eisenstadt v. Baird the Supreme Court rules that the right to privacy includes an unmarried person’s right to use contraceptives.

    June 23
    Title IX of the Education Amendments bans sex discrimination in schools.

    1973
    As a result of Roe v. Wade, the Supreme Court establishes a woman’s right to safe and legal abortion, overriding the anti-abortion laws of many states.

    1974
    The Equal Credit Opportunity Act prohibits discrimination in consumer credit practices on the basis of sex, race, marital status, religion, national origin, age, or receipt of public assistance.

    In Corning Glass Works v. Brennan, the U.S. Supreme Court rules that employers cannot justify paying women lower wages because that is what they traditionally received under the “going market rate.”

    1976
    The first marital rape law is enacted in Nebraska, making it illegal for a husband to rape his wife.

    1978
    The Pregnancy Discrimination Act bans employment discrimination against pregnant women.

    1984
    EMILY’s List (Early Money Is Like Yeast) is established as a financial network for pro-choice Democratic women running for national political office.

    1986
    Meritor Savings Bank v. Vinson, the Supreme Court finds that sexual harassment is a form of illegal job discrimination.

    1992
    In Planned Parenthood v. Casey, the Supreme Court reaffirms the validity of a woman’s right to abortion under Roe v. Wade.

    1994
    The Violence Against Women Act tightens federal penalties for sex offenders, funds services for victims of rape and domestic violence, and provides for special training of police officers.

    1996
    In United States v. Virginia, the Supreme Court rules that the all-male Virginia Military School has to admit women in order to continue to receive public funding.

    1999
    The Supreme Court rules in Kolstad v. American Dental Association that a woman can sue for punitive damages for sex discrimination if the anti-discrimination law was violated with malice or indifference to the law, even if that conduct was not especially severe.

    2003
    In Nevada Department of Human Resources v. Hibbs, the Supreme Court rules that states can be sued in federal court for violations of the Family Leave Medical Act.

    2005
    In Jackson v. Birmingham Board of Education, the Supreme Court rules that Title IX, which prohibits discrimination based on sex, also inherently prohibits disciplining someone for complaining about sex-based discrimination.

    2006
    The Supreme Court upholds the ban on the “partial-birth” abortion procedure.

    2009
    President Obama signed the Lily Ledbetter Fair Pay Restoration Act, which allows victims of pay discrimination to file a complaint with the government against their employer within 180 days of their last paycheck.

    Sources: infoplease.com , Wikipedia , USA.gov

    • pbo_womens_quote

      The Council on Women and Girls

      On March 11, 2009, President Obama signed an Executive Order creating the White House Council on Women and Girls. In his remarks at the signing, the President underscored that the purpose of the Council is “to ensure that each of the agencies in which they’re charged takes into account the needs of women and girls in the policies they draft, the programs they create, the legislation they support” and that the true purpose of our government is “to ensure that in America, all things are still possible for all people.”

      From the moment that the election results were in Americans started imagining how much progress was possible under this Administration. They imagined a government where their voices were valued. Among the strongest of these voices were women.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/cwg/about

      • Following the Footsteps of Women Who Made History

        Valerie Jarrett March 28, 2013 10:06 AM EDT

        Yesterday, I had the opportunity to speak at the screening of excerpts from an extraordinary new documentary, “Makers: Women Who Make America.” College and high school students from all over the Washington, DC area came together to watch the documentary, and hear a panel discussion with two incredible women – former Congresswoman Pat Schroeder, and former President of Brown University, Ruth Simmons – both of whom were also featured in Makers.

        Linda Douglass, Senior Vice President for Global Communications for Atlantic Media Company, moderated the panel. Linda is a former broadcast journalist who has covered six presidential campaigns.

        The documentary featured interviews and oral histories of extraordinary women who’ve made history – figures such as Gloria Steinem, Hillary Clinton, Oprah Winfrey, and everyday women who have been affected in their lives by the evolution of women’s rights, our culture, and our political climate.

        For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/03/28/following-footsteps-women-who-made-history

        ———-

        MAKERS: Women Who Make America – PBS Official Trailer

        Published on Jan 25, 2013

        Watch more incredible MAKERS stories at http://www.makers.com and tune into PBS February 26th at 8pm (check your local listings).

        The film tells the story of how women have helped shape America over the last 50 years through one of the most sweeping social revolutions in our country’s history, in pursuit of their rights to a full and fair share of political power, economic opportunity and personal autonomy.

        MAKERS is a multi-platform video experience from AOL and PBS, showcasing hundreds of compelling stories from the Women Who Make America. MAKERS originated from a very clear premise: over the last half century, the work of millions of women has altered virtually every aspect of American culture. Makers video property is a part of the AOL On Network.

      • March 18, 2013

        Remarks By The President at Women’s History Month Reception

        The East Room

        East Room

        5:04 P.M. EDT

        THE PRESIDENT: Well, hello, everybody! (Applause.) And can everybody please give Amanda another big round of applause? (Applause.) It seems to me she would be pretty good at sales. (Laughter.) I was sold just listening to her right there.

        Thank you, Amanda, for sharing your story, the wonderful introduction. It is an honor to welcome all of you here to the White House.

        Now, let’s be clear, I am used to being surrounded every day by talented, accomplished women — (applause) — from all the meetings I have in the West Wing to the dinner table with Michelle, Malia and Sasha. (Laughter.) But I have to say, even for somebody who is accustomed to it, this is a pretty exceptional group that I’m looking around here.

        We’ve got business leaders like Abbe Raven, CEO of the A&E Networks. (Applause.) There she is right there. We’ve got activists like Dolores Huerta and Lilly Ledbetter. (Applause.) All-star athletes like Tamika Catchings. (Applause.) And outstanding public servants from Congress and my administration, including Valerie Jarrett, who serves as our chair of the Council for Women and Girls here at the White House. (Applause.)

        And when I look around this room, it is hard to believe that 100 years ago this month, thousands of women were marching right outside this house demanding one of our most fundamental right: the right to vote, to have a say in our democracy. And today, a century later, its rooms are full of accomplished women who have overcome discrimination, shattered glass ceilings, and become outstanding role models for all of our sons and daughters. And that means we’ve come a long way, and that’s thanks to the efforts of so many people like you.

        Because of the hard work and exemplary leadership of the women in this room, military families have protected family and medical leave. Women have legal recourse to fight against pay discrimination, as Amanda took advantage of. Women have the opportunity to serve on the front lines of our military conflicts, and that means that they’re getting paid and promoted equally. Women have the opportunity to make their own choices about their health.

        We’re also seeing expanded opportunity for women to reach their full potential all around the world. That’s in large part because four years ago, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton — (applause) — a tireless advocate for women herself, designated an Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues whose sole job it is to make sure that women and girls are a central part of every aspect of our foreign policy, that their concerns are considered at the highest level of our diplomatic decision-making.

        For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/03/18/remarks-president-womens-history-month-reception

    • Remarks of President Barack Obama
      Weekly Address

      Saturday, March 12, 2011
      Washington, DC

      March is Women’s History Month, a time not only to celebrate the progress that women have made, but also the women throughout our history who have made that progress possible.

      One inspiring American who comes to mind is Eleanor Roosevelt. In 1961, the former First Lady was unhappy about the lack of women in government, so she marched up to President Kennedy and handed him a three-page list of women who were qualified for top posts in his administration. This led the President to select Mrs. Roosevelt as the head of a new commission to look at the status of women in America, and the unfairness they routinely faced in their lives.

      Though she passed away before the commission could finish its work, the report they released spurred action across the country. It helped galvanize a movement led by women that would help make our society a more equal place.

      It’s been almost fifty years since the Roosevelt commission published its findings – and there have been few similar efforts by the government in the decades that followed. That’s why, last week, here at the White House, we released a new comprehensive report on the status of women in the spirit on the one that was released half a century ago.

      There was a lot of positive news about the strides we’ve made, even in recent years. For example, women have caught up with men in seeking higher education. In fact, women today are more likely than men to attend and graduate from college.

      Yet, there are also reminders of how much work remains to be done. Women are still more likely to live in poverty in this country. In education, there are areas like math and engineering where women are vastly outnumbered by their male counterparts. This is especially troubling, for we know that to compete with nations around the world, these are the fields in which we need to harness the talents of all our people. That’s how we’ll win the future.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2011/03/12/weekly-address-womens-history-month-highlights-presidents-resolve-pass-p

    • Women’s History Month at the White House

      Published on Mar 29, 2013

      In honor of Women’s History Month, last week, we welcomed a group of high school students to participate in a conversation with a mentoring panel at the White House. It was followed by a celebration in the East Room with President Obama and the First Lady. We caught up with some of the notable women that participated at the day’s events and got their perspectives on how far we’ve come as a nation and where we still need to go. http://wh.gov

    • May 10, 2013

      Presidential Memorandum — Advancing Pay Equality in the Federal Government and Learning from Successful Practices

      MEMORANDUM FOR THE HEADS OF EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENTS AND AGENCIES

      SUBJECT: Advancing Pay Equality in the Federal Government and Learning from Successful Practices

      Almost 50 years ago, when President John F. Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act of 1963, women were paid 59 cents for every dollar paid to men. Today, women are paid 77 cents for every dollar paid to men. At the same time, nearly two-thirds of women are breadwinners or co-breadwinners for their families. Unjust pay disparities are a detriment to women, families, and our economy.

      The Federal Government is the Nation’s largest employer. It has a special responsibility to act as a model employer. While salary ranges in the Federal workforce are generally determined by law, the fixing of individual salaries and other types of compensation can be affected by the exercise of administrative discretion. Such discretion must be exercised in a transparent manner, using fair criteria and adhering to merit system principles, which dictate that equal pay should be provided for work of equal value.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/05/10/presidential-memorandum-advancing-pay-equality-federal-government-and-le

  3. Long-delayed EPA gasoline pollution rules set for Friday debut

    3/28/13 05:19 PM ET By Ben Geman – TheHill

    The Environmental Protection Agency will unveil draft low-sulfur gasoline and vehicle emissions rules Friday, according to a news report and a source familiar with the plan.

    Public health advocates have long pressed for the so-called Tier 3 standards, which have faced major delays, while refining industry groups say they will impose major and unnecessary costs.

    The Washington Post, citing sources briefed on the topic, reports EPA would roll out the proposed rules to cut the sulfur content of gasoline by two-thirds and set tougher vehicle pollution standards by 2017.

    A source familiar with the rule confirmed to The Hill that it’s expected to be unveiled Friday.

    Environmental groups say the rules will provide important cuts in smog-forming emissions.

    The rules could “prevent tens of thousands of asthma attacks and save thousands of lives every year,” according to the American Lung Association.

    The rules have support from automakers, who recently urged the White House Office of Management and Budget to allow the measure to go forward.

    But oil industry groups note existing rules have already led to major cuts in gasoline sulfur content, and say forcing further reductions is unneeded.

    They say new mandates will force billions of dollars in capital expenditures and add to the cost of gasoline while providing little benefit.

    • News Releases from Headquarters

      EPA Proposes Achievable Cleaner Fuels and Cars Standard, Slashing Air Pollution and Providing Extensive Health Benefits

      03/29/2013 epa

      WASHINGTON – Based on extensive input from auto manufacturers, refiners, and states, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today proposed sensible standards for cars and gasoline that will significantly reduce harmful pollution, prevent thousands of premature deaths and illnesses, while also enabling efficiency improvements in the cars and trucks we drive. These cleaner fuels and cars standards are an important component of the administration’s national program for clean cars and trucks, which also include historic fuel efficiency standards that are saving new vehicle owners at the gas pump today. Once fully in place, the standards will help avoid up to 2,400 premature deaths per year and 23,000 cases of respiratory ailments in children.

      Following a proven systems approach that addresses vehicles and fuels as an integrated system, today’s proposal will enable the greatest pollution reductions at the lowest cost. The proposal will slash emissions of a range of harmful pollutants that can cause premature death and respiratory illnesses, including reducing smog-forming volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides by 80 percent, establish a 70 percent tighter particulate matter standard, and reduce fuel vapor emissions to near zero. The proposal will also reduce vehicle emissions of toxic air pollutants, such as benzene and 1,3-butadiene, by up to 40 percent.

      The proposal supports efforts by states to reduce harmful levels of smog and soot and eases their ability to attain and maintain science-based national ambient air quality standards to protect public health, while also providing flexibilities for small businesses, including hardship provisions and additional lead time for compliance.

      “The Obama Administration has taken a series of steps to reinvigorate the auto industry and ensure that the cars of tomorrow are cleaner, more efficient and saving drivers money at the pump and these common-sense cleaner fuels and cars standards are another example of how we can protect the environment and public health in an affordable and practical way,” said EPA Acting Administrator Bob Perciasepe. “Today’s proposed standards – which will save thousands of lives and protect the most vulnerable — are the next step in our work to protect public health and will provide the automotive industry with the certainty they need to offer the same car models in all 50 states.

      For more: http://yosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.nsf/bd4379a92ceceeac8525735900400c27/eb163eb6d4c6c53585257b3d004cb646!OpenDocument

  4. West Wing Week: 03/29/13 or “Where Peace Begins”

    Published on Mar 28, 2013

    This week, the President wrapped up an historic trip to the Middle East with stops in Israel, the West Bank, and Jordan, and then returned home for a naturalization ceremony, visits with the LA Galaxy and Kings, African Leaders, young Ambassadors and Spanish Television. He wrapped up the week by pressing for commonsense action to protect children from gun violence.

  5. Consumer Spending in U.S. Climbs by Most in Five Months

    Mar 29, 2013 5:30 AM PT By Shobhana Chandra – bloomberg

    Consumer spending in the U.S. climbed in February by the most in five months as incomes rose, signaling an improving job market is spurring demand.

    Household purchases, which account for about 70 percent of the economy, gained 0.7 percent after a 0.4 percent advance the prior month that was bigger than previously estimated, a Commerce Department report showed today in Washington. The median estimate in a Bloomberg survey of 78 economists called for a 0.6 percent rise. Incomes increased 1.1 percent, more than projected, sending the saving rate up from a five-year low.

    Labor market progress and an increase in household wealth linked to rising home values and stocks are helping Americans cushion the fallout of higher payroll taxes and costlier fuel. Strength in purchases is one reason economists project the economy picked up this quarter after slowing to a 0.4 percent annual rate in the final three months of 2012.

    “The U.S. outlook is encouraging,” Nigel Gault, chief U.S. economist for IHS Global Insight in Lexington, Massachusetts, said before the report. “There are some temporary setbacks but once we get past them, the economy will accelerate.”

    Projections for spending ranged from gains of 0.3 percent to 0.9 percent. The January reading was previously reported as an increase of 0.2 percent.

    The Bloomberg survey median called for incomes to rise 0.8 percent. The gain in February followed a 3.7 percent drop the prior month that reflected, in part, the 2 percentage-point increase in the payroll tax.

    For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-03-29/consumer-spending-in-u-s-increases-by-most-in-five-months.html

  6. Consumer Sentiment

    Released On 3/29/2013 9:55:00 AM For Mar, 2013

    Prior Consensus Consensus Range Actual
    Sentiment Index – Level 71.8 72.5 71.7 to 78.5 78.6

    Highlights
    It’s rare to see this much volatility in the consumer sentiment report which ends March at 78.6 vs a mid-month reading of 71.8. The final reading implies a mid-80s pace for the final two weeks of the month which is the very strongest pace of the whole recovery! As is, the 78.6 level is up 1 point from February for the fourth highest reading of the recovery, behind low 80 readings late last year and a 79-plus reading back in May.

    The current conditions component, at 90.7, is a recovery best and points to strength for March economic data including the employment report and perhaps the retail sales report. Less strong is the expectations component at 70.8 which is well down from nearly 80 readings late last year though it is up six tenths from February. A separate reading on the 12-month economic outlook, at 85, is down 2 points from February though it is up 15 points from mid-month.

    Inflation expectations are easing in line with easing pressure at the gas pump. One-year expectations are at 3.2 percent, down 1 tenth from both the mid-month reading and the final February reading. Five-year expectations are at 2.8 percent, down 1 tenth from mid-month and down 2 tenths from February.

    The dramatic surge the last two weeks in this report is difficult to explain given the lack of positive news. The gain may be tied to volatility in the report itself. In any case, the final results show a slight firming in month-to-month sentiment that contrasts with other readings on the consumer, including the weekly Bloomberg consumer comfort report and especially the Conference Board’s monthly consumer confidence report which shows significant weakness this month.

    In sum, the consumer is generally reporting ongoing strength in the economy but is less upbeat about the outlook, the result no doubt of higher payroll taxes and uncertainty over the effects of sequestration.

    Source: http://bloomberg.econoday.com/byshoweventfull.asp?fid=456225&cust=bloomberg-us&year=2013&lid=0&prev=/byweek.asp#top

  7. Payrolls Increased in 42 U.S. States in February, Led by Texas

    Mar 29, 2013 7:07 AM PT By Michelle Jamrisko – bloomberg

    Payrolls grew in 42 U.S. states in February and the unemployment rate fell in 22, showing the labor market in improving through most of the country.

    Texas led with an 80,600 hiring increase, followed by California with 41,200, according to figures from the Labor Department today in Washington.

  8. Tattoo Removal Artist Helps Clients With Emotional Scars

    March 29, 2013 3:09 AM by NPR STAFF

    Dawn Maestas runs a tattoo-removal business in Albuquerque, N.M., and her clients include women who want the names of abusive partners removed.

    Some of them have been tattooed forcibly, like the 22-year-old client who visited StoryCorps with Maestas.

    “I was with a guy for five years. He was much older. He was really abusive toward me. After a while when I tried to finally end it, he kidnapped me, held me hostage and tattooed his name all over my body against my will,” says the woman, who did not want to be named.

    Maestas removes the tattoos for free because she, too, has lived through domestic violence. She understands.

    “Every time that you had to get dressed and undressed, you would have to look at that tattoo and know where it came from,” she tells her client. “When you walked in my office, it was déjà vu. I knew the loneliness, the embarrassment, and I was so angry that life had done to you what it had done to me.”

    Maestas says her ex made references to her tattoo of his name all the time. “That he owned me,” she says. “This is a person who locks his arms around your legs at night, and you have to ask for permission to use the restroom. So, you know, it’s not just a tattoo. It’s … like being in a car accident — every time you pass that intersection you remember the impact.”

    Maestas’ client is grateful for the understanding.

    For the entire article and audio interview: http://www.npr.org/2013/03/29/175585389/tattoo-removal-artist-helps-clients-with-emotional-scars

  9. In my twin sister’s rape, there were many victims

    March 28 By Christa Parravani – washingtonpost

    Christa Parravani is the author of “Her: A Memoir.”

    Whether you’re traveling on a bus in New Delhi, India, or drinking at a teen party in Stuebenville, Ohio, rape, it seems, is never far. In the United States, nearly one in five women have been raped at some point in their lives, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — most of them before age 25. Across the planet, more than one in three women will be physically or sexually abused by men.

    But whatever the grisly statistics, the number of people damaged by rape is much higher. Those devastated by sexual violence against women far outnumber any official tallies.

    I know this math intimately.

    In 2001, my identical twin, Cara, was raped by Edgardo Hernandez, a stranger, when we were 24. It was a violent act that destroyed her. And then it almost destroyed me.

    After her rape, Cara took drugs in quantities that would prove to be lethal, doses she felt she needed to help her forget. She died from an overdose of heroin laced with fentanyl, a pain medication, on a late spring afternoon — June 13, 2006. And even though her death was an accident, no one who knew Cara doubts that Hernandez, though he didn’t murder her, took her life nonetheless. It just took four years, seven months and 26 days.

    Cara said it best from the witness stand during her rapist’s sentencing: “Edgardo Hernandez is the worst kind of thief. He did not steal my wedding rings, yet my marriage has dissolved. He did not take my legs, yet for over a year I was afraid to leave my house, to walk around in broad daylight. October 18, 2001, was the day I died.”

    For more: http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/in-my-twin-sisters-rape-there-were-many-victims/2013/03/28/09ac8442-9622-11e2-894a-b984cbdff2e6_story.html?hpid=z1

  10. How to block a presidency

    Mar 29, 2013 11:20 AM EDT By Steve Benen – maddowblog

    The New York Times editorial board tackles one of my favorite subjects today, reflecting on Senate filibuster abuses, but while the piece gets everything right, it probably doesn’t go quite far enough.

    Earlier this month, during one of his new across-the-aisle good-will tours, President Obama pleaded with Senate Republicans to ease up on their record number of filibusters of his nominees. He might as well have been talking to one of the statues in the Capitol. Republicans have made it clear that erecting hurdles for Mr. Obama is, if anything, their overriding legislative goal.

    There is no historical precedent for the number of cabinet-level nominees that Republicans have blocked or delayed in the Obama administration.

    From there, the Times’ editorial board runs through a list that will probably be familiar to Maddow Blog readers: filibusters of cabinet nominees for the first time in American history, holds on key nominees for petty reasons, using the confirmation process as part larger legislative extortion strategies, blocking judicial nominations at farcical levels, etc.

    All of this is entirely accurate, and to my mind, incredibly important. But there’s a larger point that’s often overlooked: Obama’s Republican opponents are using obstructionist tactics to block key parts of the Obama presidency itself.

    Senate Republicans, for example, blocked Caitlin Halligan’s D.C. Circuit nomination, which was an outrageous move on its own. But as Dave Weigel noted the other day, there’s an ancillary effect that’s easy to miss — the D.C. Circuit hears cases related to federal regulations, and Haley Edwards explained very well that its conservative judges have already begun chipping away at the Dodd-Frank financial regulatory-reform law.

    For more: http://maddowblog.msnbc.com/_news/2013/03/29/17517563-how-to-block-a-presidency?lite

  11. March 28, 2013

    Statement by President Obama on the 15th Anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement

    As Easter approaches, we mark the 15th anniversary of the signing of the Good Friday Agreement. The people of Northern Ireland and their leaders have traveled a great distance over the past fifteen years. Step by step, they have traded bullets for ballots, destruction and division for dialogue and institutions, and pointed the way toward a shared future for all. There is urgent work still to be done – and there will be more tests to come. There are still those few who prefer to look backward rather than forward – who prefer to inspire hate rather than hope. The many who have brought Northern Ireland this far must keep rejecting their call. From building cross-community trust to bringing opportunity to hard-to-reach communities in Belfast and beyond, every citizen and every political party needs to work together in service of true and lasting peace and prosperity. And at every step of the way, the United States will be there as a friend and partner. That is the message I will carry with me when I visit Northern Ireland and attend the G-8 Summit in June.

    On behalf of the American people, I salute the people and leaders of Northern Ireland and the model they have given to others struggling toward peace and reconciliation around the world. I pledge our continued support for their efforts to build a strong society, a vibrant economy, and an enduring peace.

    • March 29, 2013

      Remarks by the President on Rebuilding America Partnership in Miami, Florida

      PortMiami
      Miami, Florida

      1:40 P.M. EDT

      THE PRESIDENT: Hello, Miami! (Applause.) It is good to be back. You know, I’ve been waiting for spring. I realize I just had to come down to Miami. (Laughter.) It is wonderful to be here.

      We’ve got some outstanding representatives in Congress from this area — Joe Garcia is in the house. (Applause.) Frederica Wilson is in the house. (Applause.) And we’ve got Debbie Wasserman Schultz here. (Applause.) I want to thank the Mayor of Miami-Dade County, Carlos Gimenez. (Applause.) And of course, it’s good to see all of you. And I want to thank the gentlemen who just gave me a amazing tour of the PortMiami Tunnel.

      LITTLE GIRL: Yea!

      THE PRESIDENT: What are you yelling about? Hey, sweetie. (Applause.)

      WOMAN: She came just to see you!

      THE PRESIDENT: Okay, well, hello. (Laughter.) She’s going to be a politician because I could hear her without a mic from far away. (Laughter.)

      Now, before we get started, I’ve got to get into a sticky subject right off the bat. I know you guys aren’t happy with my Chicago Bulls.

      AUDIENCE: Booo —

      THE PRESIDENT: But I just want you to know the Heat are going to be just fine. They’re going to be okay. (Applause.) They are playing basketball the right way. The Hurricanes — they had a great season — no, no, they deserve a big round of applause. (Applause.) Tonight you’ve got Florida and Florida Gulf Coast going at it. (Applause.) One of them will go to the Elite Eight. So, let’s face it, Florida is the center of basketball right now. (Applause.)

      But I’m not here to talk about hoops. I’m here to talk about one of the plans that I put forward in my State of the Union address — a plan to put people to work rebuilding America.

      I’ve come to PortMiami today because there are few more important things we can do to create jobs right now and strengthen our economy over the long haul than rebuilding the infrastructure that powers our businesses and our economy — our roads, our bridges, our schools, and our ports just like this one.

      As President, my top priority is to make sure we are doing everything we can to reignite the true engine of our economic growth — and that is a rising, thriving middle class. A growing economy that creates good, middle-class jobs – that’s got to be our true North. That’s what has to guide our efforts every single day. And to do that, we should be asking ourselves three questions every single day: Number one, how do we make America a magnet for good jobs? Number two, how do we equip our workers with the skills they need to do the jobs? Number three, how do we make sure that hard work leads to a decent living?

      When it comes to good jobs, no workers were hammered harder by the recession than construction workers. Fortunately, the unemployment rate for construction has been cut nearly in half over the past three years, partly because the housing market is starting to bounce back. But construction still has the highest unemployment rate of any industry. Breaking ground on more projects like this tunnel that I just saw means more good construction jobs that can’t be outsourced. They have to be done right here in America. And they end up giving people good pay and good opportunities to raise their families. (Applause.)

      Projects like this create a lot of other good jobs, too. You ask any CEO where we they rather locate their business and hire new workers. Are you going to set up shop in a country that’s got raggedy roads, runways that are pot-holed, and backed-up supply chains? Or are you going to seek out high-speed rail, Internet, high-tech schools, new state-of-the-art power grids, new bridges, new tunnels, new ports that help you ship products made in America to the rest of the world as fast as possible? (Applause.) That’s what people are looking for. That’s what CEOs are looking for.

      When you ask companies who brought jobs back to America in the last few years they’ll say, if we upgrade our infrastructure, we’ll bring even more. So what are we waiting for? There’s work to be done; there are workers who are ready to do it. Let’s prove to the world there’s no better place to do business than right here in the United States of America, and let’s get started rebuilding America. (Applause.)

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/03/29/remarks-president-rebuilding-america-partnership-miami-florida

    • March 29, 2013

      The “Rebuild America Partnership”: The President’s Plan to Encourage Private Investment in America’s Infrastructure

      Investing in infrastructure not only makes our roads, bridges, and ports safer and gives our businesses and workers the tools to compete successfully in the global economy, it also creates thousands of good American jobs that cannot be outsourced. Since the President took office four years ago, America has begun the hard work of rebuilding our infrastructure: American workers have improved over 350,000 miles of U.S. roads and more than 6,000 miles of rail, and they have repaired or replaced over 20,000 bridges. But there’s more to do, and taxpayers shouldn’t have to shoulder the entire burden themselves.

      We know that America works best when it’s calling upon the resources and ingenuity of our vibrant private sector. That’s why the President’s plan calls for a Rebuild America Partnership to help attract the private capital that can go toward building the infrastructure our workers and businesses need most.

      By acting on the President’s plan, together we can build an infrastructure that’s second-to-none and prove that there is no better place to do business and create jobs than right here in the United States of America.

      • Partnering with the Private Sector to Create Jobs and Invest in the Projects We Need Most

      • Giving State and Local Governments Flexible New Tools to Invest in Infrastructure

      • Building the Transportation Network Our Businesses and Workers Need to Succeed

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/03/29/rebuild-america-partnership-president-s-plan-encourage-private-investmen

  12. WH

    Saturday, March 23, 2013

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    4:35 PM
    President Obama takes in an NCAA tournament game – Syracuse versus Marquette
    Verizon Center in Washington, D.C

    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  13. DOGMA

    It isn’t gay marriage that should trouble the Supreme Court, says Kevin Fisher-Paulson. It’s straight marriage.

    3/25/13 By Kevin Fisher-Paulson – KQED

    As the Supreme Court prepares to hear arguments on the legality of my marriage, I came to the conclusion that they should be ruling on their own matrimony. The real threat to this sacred institution is opposite sex marriage.

    As religious leaders will tell you, the purpose of a marriage is to stay together forever and to raise children.

    So let’s look at the forever part. Opposite sex couples divorce almost one out of every two marriages: 41 percent of first marriages end in divorce, 67 percent of second marriages end in divorce and a whopping 74 percent of third marriage end in divorce. In other words, the more that a straight person marries, the more likely he or she is to divorce.

    Gays haven’t had much time to get married, let alone divorced, but currently straights are divorcing at twice the rate of gays. It’s that whole people from Venus business really do understand each other better than the people from Mars.

    And we all know that the purpose of marriage is to have children, right? Again, opposite sex couples are ruining this holy precept. In 1976, census data indicated that 10% of opposite sex marriages were childless, and by 2003, that number had almost doubled to 19%. On the other hand, now that gays and lesbians have the ability to parent in many but not all states, the percentage of same sex couples with children has tripled from a mere 8% in 2000 to one out of four gay couples now with children. And perhaps even more important, not one of us gay couples is having a child by accident. Like Chief Justice Roberts, many of us adopt. Our family is truly a family of choice.

    Ironically, while opposite sex couples are casually doing driveby weddings in Vegas, we gays are treating marriage with tradition, and I daresay, reverence. Maybe it’s because we have to fight so hard for it.

    For the entire article and audio in statement: http://www.kqed.org/a/perspectives/R201303250735

  14. Obama attends Syracuse-Marquette NCAA game

    3/30/13 6:17 PM EDT By POLITICO STAFF

    President Obama on Saturday took in an NCAA tournament game – Syracuse versus Marquette for a place in the Final Four.

    He arrived at the Verizon Center in Washington, D.C., at 4:35 p.m. following a round of golf at Andrews Air Force Base, according to pool reports, and soon was featured on the arena’s giant screen, smiling and waving to cheers and applause.

    Although neither team featured on Obama’s picks to reach the East Regional Final, the president brought his own bracket-buster with him – his body man Reggie Love, a member of Duke’s 2001 championship-winning team.

    UPDATE: Syracuse beat Marquette, 55-39.

  15. March 30, 2013

    Statement by the Press Secretary on the Presidential Election in Kenya

    On behalf of the President and the people of the United States, we congratulate Uhuru Kenyatta on his election as president of Kenya. We also congratulate the people of Kenya on the peaceful conduct of the election and commend Raila Odinga for accepting the Supreme Court’s decision. We urge all Kenyans to peacefully accept the results of the election. The electoral process and the peaceful adjudication of disputes in the Kenyan legal system are testaments to the progress Kenya has made in strengthening its democratic institutions, and the desire of the Kenyan people to move their country forward.

    Now is the time for Kenyans to come together to fully implement the political, institutional, and accountability reforms envisioned in the Kenyan constitution. Kenya is an important member of the international community. We welcome and wish to underscore the importance of Kenya’s commitment to uphold its international obligations, including those with respect to international justice.

    For 50 years, the United States and Kenya have been strong partners. Our relationship is based on a shared commitment to democracy, security, and opportunity. The United States remains committed to our long-standing partnership with the Kenyan people.

  16. ********************
    THIS POST IS NOW CLOSED NBLB

    Come on over to my newest post titled: “135th White House Easter Egg Roll ”

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