Clean Water Act of 1972

Clean Water Act

The Clean Water Act

This Act [ voted into law on October 18, 1972 by Congress’ supermajority vote  over riding President Nixon’s (R) veto]  , is the principle law governing pollution control and water quality of the Nation’s waterways. The objective of this Act is to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Nation’s waters (33 U.S.C. 1251). The Act has been amended numerous times and given a number of titles and codification. It was originally enacted as the Water Pollution Control Act in 1948 (P.L. 80-845), and was completely revised by the 1972 amendments, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments (P.L. 92-500). The 1972 amendments gave the Act its current form, and established a national goal that all waters of the U.S. should be fishable and swimmable. The goal was to be achieved by eliminating all pollutant discharges into waters of the U.S. by 1985 with an interim goal of making the waters safe for fish, shellfish, wildlife and people by July 1, 1983 (86 Stat. 816, 33 U.S.C. 1251) . The 1977 amendments (the Clean Water Act of 1977 (P.L. 95-217)) gave the Act its current title. Additional amendments were enacted in 1981 (Municipal Wastewater Treatment Construction Grants Amendments (P.L. 97-117)) and in 1987 (Water Quality Act of 1987 (P.L. 100-4).  The Act regulates discharges to waters of the United States through permits issued under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting program. The Water Quality Protection Division, issues the NPDES permits and the Water Enforcement Branch assures that all discharges comply with the NPDES permits.

 Learn more: http://www.epa.gov/region6/6en/w/cwa.htm

Clean Water Legislative History

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clean_water_act

.Water Pollution

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13 thoughts on “Clean Water Act of 1972

  1. WH

    Friday, October 18, 2013

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

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    President Obama meets with senior advisors

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    President Barack Obama makes a personnel statement

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  2. Clean Water Act

    This Act, voted into law on October 18, 1972, is the principle law governing pollution control and water quality of the Nation’s waterways. The objective of this Act is to restore and maintain the chemical, physical and biological integrity of the Nation’s waters (33 U.S.C. 1251). The Act has been amended numerous times and given a number of titles and codification. It was originally enacted as the Water Pollution Control Act in 1948 (P.L. 80-845), and was completely revised by the 1972 amendments, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments (P.L. 92-500). The 1972 amendments gave the Act its current form, and established a national goal that all waters of the U.S. should be fishable and swimmable. The goal was to be achieved by eliminating all pollutant discharges into waters of the U.S. by 1985 with an interim goal of making the waters safe for fish, shellfish, wildlife and people by July 1, 1983 (86 Stat. 816, 33 U.S.C. 1251) . The 1977 amendments (the Clean Water Act of 1977 (P.L. 95-217)) gave the Act its current title. Additional amendments were enacted in 1981 (Municipal Wastewater Treatment Construction Grants Amendments (P.L. 97-117)) and in 1987 (Water Quality Act of 1987 (P.L. 100-4).  The Act regulates discharges to waters of the United States through permits issued under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting program. The Water Quality Protection Division, issues the NPDES permits and the Water Enforcement Branchassures that all discharges comply with the NPDES permits.

     Learn more: http://www.epa.gov/region6/6en/w/cwa.htm

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    Clean Water Act legislative history

    Introduced in the Senate as S. 2770 by Edmund Muskie(D–ME) on October 28, 1971
    Committee consideration by: Senate Public Works Committee
    Passed the Senate on November 2, 1971 (86-0)
    Passed the House on March 29, 1972 (passed)
    Reported by the joint conference committee onOctober 4, 1972; agreed to by the House on October 4, 1972 (366-11) and by the Senate on October 4, 1972 (74-0)
    Vetoed by President Richard Nixon (R) on October 17, 1972
    Overridden by the Senate on October 17, 1972 (52-12)
    Overridden by the House and became law on October 18, 1972 (247-23)

    • Our Water is Connected

      cleanwateraction.org

      If you drink water or like to swim or fish in rivers and lakes, you should be happy about recent actions by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). EPA has taken important steps toward clarifying what small streams, wetlands and other waters can be protected from pollution and development. For decades, Clean Water Action, our members, and allies have advocated for stronger protections for vulnerable headwater streams and wetlands that feed drinking water supplies for more than a third of all Americans and support water quality of downstream rivers, lakes and bays. But, for more than a decade, many of these water bodies have been at risk because of two Supreme Court rulings and subsequent Bush Administration policies that called into question whether or not they are protected by the Clean Water Act.

      On September 17, 2013, EPA released the first-ever report on the “connectivity” of smaller streams and wetlands to downstream rivers, lakes, and bays. This report is a synthesis of over 1000 peer-reviewed studies and articles about how these smaller streams and wetlands are connected to larger ones and perform critical functions that benefit whole watersheds.

      For more: http://cleanwateraction.org/feature/our-water-connected

  3. Obama to pick former Pentagon lawyer to replace Napolitano

    10/17/13 04:02 PM ET By Jeremy Herb and Justin Sink – TheHill

    The White House has selected the Pentagon’s former top attorney to lead the Department of Homeland Security, a White House official confirmed to The Hill.

    President Obama intends to nominate former Pentagon General Counsel Jeh Johnson to replace Janet Napolitano as Homeland Security secretary, the official said. Johnson’s nomination will be announced at a White House ceremony on Friday.

    Johnson left the Pentagon at the end of 2012 to return to private practice after serving as the Defense Department’s top lawyer through Obama’s first term.

    He played a role in helping craft the Obama administration’s counterterrorism policies, and he was a key player in the administration’s effort that led to repealing the ban on gay service members serving openly in the military.

    Johnson’s nomination was first reported by The Daily Beast.

    Johnson will replace Napolitano, who left her post last month to become the next president of the University of California system.

    Read more: http://thehill.com/blogs/defcon-hill/policy-and-strategy/329177-obama-picks-former-pentagon-lawyer-to-replace-napolitano-at-dhs

    • October 18, 2013

      Remarks by the President at Nomination of Jeh Johnson to be Secretary of Homeland Security

      REMARKS BY THE PRESIDENT

      AT NOMINATION OF JEH JOHNSON

      TO BE SECRETARY OF HOMELAND SECURITY

      Rose Garden

      2:06 P.M. EDT

      THE PRESIDENT: Good afternoon, everybody. Please have a seat. As President, my most solemn responsibility is the safety and security of the American people. And we’ve got an outstanding team here of folks who work every single day to make sure that we’re doing everything we can to fulfill that responsibility. And that means that our entire government — our law enforcement and homeland security professionals, our troops, our diplomats, our intelligence personnel — are all working together. It means working with state and local partners to disrupt terrorist attacks, to make our borders more secure, respond to natural disasters, and make our immigration system more effective and fair.

      Addressing any one of these challenges is a tall order. Addressing all of them at once is a monumental task. But that’s what the dedicated men and women of the Department of Homeland Security do every day. And today I’m proud to announce my choice to lead them — an outstanding public servant who I’ve known and trusted for years — Mr. Jeh Johnson.

      We are, of course, enormously grateful to Secretary Janet Napolitano. Janet couldn’t be here today — she’s already made her move to her new position in sunny California, overseeing the higher education system in that great state. And I know that she’s going to do an outstanding job there with the incredible young people that are in our largest state. But we all deeply appreciate the terrific job that she did over the last four-and-a-half years. I want to thank Rand Beers for his service and for stepping in as Acting Secretary after Janet left.

      Thanks in no small part to Janet’s leadership, her team, we’ve done more to protect our homeland against those who wish to do us harm. We’ve strengthened our borders. We’ve taken steps to make sure our immigration system better reflects our values. We’ve helped thousands of Americans recover from hurricanes and tornados, floods and wildfires. And we’ve worked to clean up a massive oil spill in the Gulf as well as address a flu pandemic.

      In Jeh Johnson, we have the right person to continue this important work. From the moment I took office, Jeh was an absolutely critical member of my national security team, and he demonstrated again and again the qualities that will make him a strong Secretary of Homeland Security.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2013/10/18/remarks-president-nomination-jeh-johnson-be-secretary-homeland-security

  4. West Wing Week 10/18/13 or, “The Shutdown Edition: The End”

    Published on Oct 18, 2013

    Welcome to the West Wing Week, your guide to everything that’s happening at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. This week, the government shutdown came to an end, and the nation averted default. That’s October 11th to October 17th or “The Shutdown Edition: The End”

  5. rainbow-flag

    NJ court agrees to allow same-sex marriages Monday

    10/18/13 1 hour ago By GEOFF MULVIHILL – AP

    Same-sex marriages will begin within days in New Jersey after the state’s highest court ruled unanimously Friday to uphold a lower-court order that gay weddings must start Monday and to deny a delay that was sought by Gov. Chris Christie’s administration.

    “The state has advanced a number of arguments, but none of them overcome this reality: Same-sex couples who cannot marry are not treated equally under the law today,” the court ruled. “The harm to them is real, not abstract or speculative.”

    A judge on the lower court had ruled last month that New Jersey must recognize same-sex marriage and set Monday as the date to allow gay weddings. Christie, a Republican who is considered a possible 2016 presidential candidate, appealed the decision and asked for the start date to be put on hold while the state Supreme Court decides the case.

    For more: http://news.yahoo.com/nj-court-agrees-allow-same-sex-marriages-monday-183328605.html

  6. WH

    Saturday, October 19, 2013

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

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  7. Working Together on Behalf of the American People

    Remarks of President Barack Obama
    Weekly Address
    The White House

    October 19, 2013

    Hi everybody. This week, because Democrats and responsible Republicans came together, the government was reopened, and the threat of default was removed from our economy.

    There’s been a lot of discussion lately of the politics of this shutdown. But the truth is, there were no winners in this. At a time when our economy needs more growth and more jobs, the manufactured crises of these last few weeks actually harmed jobs and growth. And it’s understandable that your frustration with what goes on in Washington has never been higher.

    The way business is done in Washington has to change. Now that these clouds of crisis and uncertainty have lifted, we need to focus on what the majority of Americans sent us here to do – grow the economy, create good jobs, strengthen the middle class, lay the foundation for broad-based prosperity, and get our fiscal house in order for the long haul.

    It won’t be easy. But we can make progress. Specifically, there are three places where I believe that Democrats and Republicans can work together right away.

    First, we should sit down and pursue a balanced approach to a responsible budget, one that grows our economy faster and shrinks our long-term deficits further. There is no choice between growth and fiscal responsibility – we need both. So we’re making a serious mistake if a budget doesn’t focus on what you’re focused on: creating more good jobs that pay better wages. If we’re going to free up resources for the things that help us grow – education, infrastructure, research – we should cut what we don’t need, and close corporate tax loopholes that don’t help create jobs. This shouldn’t be as difficult as it has been in past years. Remember, our deficits are shrinking – not growing.

    Second, we should finish the job of fixing our broken immigration system. There’s already a broad coalition across America that’s behind this effort, from business leaders to faith leaders to law enforcement. It would grow our economy. It would secure our borders. The Senate has already passed a bill with strong bipartisan support. Now the House should, too. The majority of Americans thinks this is the right thing to do. It can and should get done by the end of this year.

    Third, we should pass a farm bill – one that America’s farmers and ranchers can depend on, one that protects vulnerable children and adults in times of need, and one that gives rural communities opportunities to grow and the longer-term certainty they deserve.

    We won’t suddenly agree on everything now that the cloud of crisis has passed. But we shouldn’t hold back on places where we do agree, just because we don’t think it’s good politics, or just because the extremes in our parties don’t like compromise. I’ll look for willing partners from either party to get important work done. There’s no good reason why we can’t govern responsibly, without lurching from manufactured crisis to manufactured crisis. Because that isn’t governing – it’s just hurting the people we were sent here to serve.

    Those of us who have the privilege to serve this country have an obligation to do our job the best we can. We come from different parties, but we’re Americans first. And our obligations to you must compel all of us, Democrats and Republicans, to cooperate, and compromise, and act in the best interests of this country we love.

    Thanks everybody, and have a great weekend.

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