1960 Greensboro Sit-Ins

Greensboro sit-ins

The Greensboro sit-ins were a series of nonviolent protests in 1960 which led to the Woolworth department store chain reversing its policy of racial segregation in the Southern United States.

While not the first sit-ins of the African-American Civil Rights Movement, the Greensboro sit-ins were an instrumental action, leading to increased national sentiment at a crucial period in US history. The primary event took place at the Greensboro, North Carolina Woolworth store, now the International Civil Rights Center and Museum.

In August 1939, African-American attorney Samuel Wilbert Tucker organized a sit-in at the then-segregated Alexandria, Virginia library. In 1942, the Congress of Racial Equality sponsored sit-ins in Chicago, as they did in St. Louis in 1949 and Baltimore in 1952. A 1958 sit-in in Wichita, Kansas also was successful.

On February 1, 1960,at 4:30pm four students from the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University sat down at the lunch counter inside the Woolworth store at 132 South Elm Street in Greensboro, North Carolina.The men, later known as the A&T Four or the Greensboro Four, went to Woolworth’s Store, bought toothpaste and other products from a desegregated counter at the store with no problems, and then were refused service from the segregated lunch counter, at the same store. Following store policy, the lunch counter staff refused to serve the African American men at the “whites only” counter and the store’s manager asked them to leave.

The four university freshmen – Joseph McNeilFranklin McCainEzell Blair, Jr. (later known as Jibreel Khazan), and David Richmond – stayed until the store closed.

The next day, more than twenty African American students who had been recruited from other campus groups came to the store to join the sit-in. Students from Bennett College, a college for African American women in Greensboro, joined the protest. White customers heckled the black students, who read books and studied to keep busy. The lunch counter staff continued to refuse service.

Newspaper reporters and a TV videographer covered the second day of peaceful demonstrations and others in the community learned of the protests. On the third day, more than 60 people came to the Woolworth store. A statement issued by Woolworth national headquarters said the company would “abide by local custom” and maintain its segregated policy.

More than 300 people took part on the fourth day. Organizers agreed to spread the sit-in protests to include the lunch counter at Greensboro’s Kress store.

As early as one week after the Greensboro sit-in had begun, students in other North Carolina towns launched their own sit-ins. Demonstrations spread to towns near Greensboro, including Winston-Salem, Durham, Raleigh, and Charlotte. Out-of-state towns like Lexington, Kentucky also saw protests.

The movement then spread to other Southern cities including Richmond, Virginia, and Nashville, Tennessee where the students of the Nashville Student Movement had been trained for a sit-in by civil rights activist James Lawson and had already started the process when Greensboro occurred. Although the majority of these protests were peaceful, there were instances where protests became violent. For example, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, tensions rose between blacks and whites and fights broke out. Another city where sit-ins occurred was Jackson, Mississippi. Students from Tougaloo College staged a sit-in on May 28, 1963. The incident is recorded in the autobiography of one of the members in attendance, Anne Moody. Moody described the treatment of the whites who were at the counter when they sat down, as well as the formation of the mob in the store and how they managed to finally leave the store.

As the sit-ins continued, tensions grew in Greensboro and students began a far-reaching boycott of stores that had segregated lunch counters. Sales at the boycotted stores dropped by a third, leading the stores’ owners to abandon their segregation policies. Black employees of Greensboro’s Woolworth store were the first to be served at the store’s lunch counter. This event occurred on Monday, July 25, 1960. The entire Woolworth was desegregated, serving blacks and whites alike, although Woolworth lunch counters in other Tennessee cities, such as Jackson, continued to be segregated until around 1965, despite many protests.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greensboro_sit-ins

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National Park Service
The F.W. Woolworth Building on South Elm Street (the Northeast Shopping Center) is part of the Downtown Greensboro Historic District. The building currently houses the International Civil Rights Center and Museum.  http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/civilrights/nc1.htm

Smithsonian photos
Freedom Struggle – Sitting for Justice: Woolworth’s Lunch Counter

US Minorities Civil Rights Timeline 1863-1963 (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

US Minorities Civil Rights Timeline 1964-2016 (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

44 thoughts on “1960 Greensboro Sit-Ins

  1. WH

    Friday, January 31, 2014

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    10:30 AM
    President Obama meets with CEOs
    The President is asking every business leader in America to help the long-term unemployed get into jobs because we are stronger when America fields a team at full strength.
    State Dining Room

    11:00 AM
    11:30 AM
    President Obama delivers remarks on helping the long term unemployed
    East Room

    12:00 PM
    First Lady Michelle Obama attends “A Women’s Brunch” Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee fundraiser
    Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, CA

    12:30 PM
    White House Press Secretary Jay Carney briefs the press

    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    President Obama joins White House Google+ Hangouts with people across the United States and talk with Americans about the issues laid out in his speech
    Roosevelt Room

    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  2. 1960 Greensboro Sit-ins

    The Greensboro sit-ins were a series of nonviolent protests in 1960 which led to the Woolworth department store chain reversing its policy of racial segregation in the Southern United States.

    While not the first sit-ins of the African-American Civil Rights Movement, the Greensboro sit-ins were an instrumental action, leading to increased national sentiment at a crucial period in US history. The primary event took place at the Greensboro, North Carolina Woolworth store, now the International Civil Rights Center and Museum.

    In August 1939, African-American attorney Samuel Wilbert Tucker organized a sit-in at the then-segregated Alexandria, Virginialibrary. In 1942, the Congress of Racial Equality sponsored sit-ins in Chicago, as they did in St. Louis in 1949 and Baltimore in 1952. A 1958 sit-in in Wichita, Kansas also was successful.

    On February 1, 1960,at 4:30pm four students from the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University sat down at the lunch counter inside the Woolworth store at 132 South Elm Street in Greensboro, North Carolina.The men, later known as the A&T Four or the Greensboro Four, went to Woolworth’s Store, bought toothpaste and other products from a desegregated counter at the store with no problems, and then were refused service from the segregated lunch counter, at the same store. Following store policy, the lunch counter staff refused to serve the African American men at the “whites only” counter and the store’s manager asked them to leave.

    The four university freshmen – Joseph McNeil, Franklin McCain, Ezell Blair, Jr. (later known as Jibreel Khazan), and David Richmond – stayed until the store closed.

    The next day, more than twenty African American students who had been recruited from other campus groups came to the store to join the sit-in. Students from Bennett College, a college for African American women in Greensboro, joined the protest. White customers heckled the black students, who read books and studied to keep busy. The lunch counter staff continued to refuse service.

    Newspaper reporters and a TV videographer covered the second day of peaceful demonstrations and others in the community learned of the protests. On the third day, more than 60 people came to the Woolworth store. A statement issued by Woolworth national headquarters said the company would “abide by local custom” and maintain its segregated policy.

    More than 300 people took part on the fourth day. Organizers agreed to spread the sit-in protests to include the lunch counter at Greensboro’s Kress store.

    As early as one week after the Greensboro sit-in had begun, students in other North Carolina towns launched their own sit-ins. Demonstrations spread to towns near Greensboro, including Winston-Salem, Durham, Raleigh, and Charlotte. Out-of-state towns like Lexington, Kentucky also saw protests.

    The movement then spread to other Southern cities including Richmond, Virginia, and Nashville, Tennessee where the students of the Nashville Student Movement had been trained for a sit-in by civil rights activist James Lawson and had already started the process when Greensboro occurred. Although the majority of these protests were peaceful, there were instances where protests became violent. For example, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, tensions rose between blacks and whites and fights broke out. Another city where sit-ins occurred was Jackson, Mississippi. Students from Tougaloo College staged a sit-in on May 28, 1963. The incident is recorded in the autobiography of one of the members in attendance, Anne Moody. Moody described the treatment of the whites who were at the counter when they sat down, as well as the formation of the mob in the store and how they managed to finally leave the store.

    As the sit-ins continued, tensions grew in Greensboro and students began a far-reaching boycott of stores that had segregated lunch counters. Sales at the boycotted stores dropped by a third, leading the stores’ owners to abandon their segregation policies. Black employees of Greensboro’s Woolworth store were the first to be served at the store’s lunch counter. This event occurred on Monday, July 25, 1960. The entire Woolworth was desegregated, serving blacks and whites alike, although Woolworth lunch counters in other Tennessee cities, such as Jackson, continued to be segregated until around 1965, despite many protests.

    For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greensboro_sit-ins

    • Strength In Numbers: F. W. Woolworth’s Lunch Counter Sit-ins & The Freedom Ride

      Uploaded on Aug 18, 2011

    • Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Woolworth Lunch Counter Student Sit-In

      Uploaded on Feb 25, 2010

      The three surviving members of the Greensboro Four, Jibreel Khazan (formerly Ezell Blair, Jr.), Franklin McCain, and Joseph McNeil participated in an oral history about their bold action that ignited student involvement in the Civil Rights Movement when they staged a sit-in at the Woolworth lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina on February 1, 1960. The four men were only freshmen at North Carolina A&T University when they began the movement that would lead to the desegregation of that particular lunch counter and sparked a student movement that spread across the nation. This was an opportunity for students around the same age as the Greensboro Four at the time of their protest to learn about student activism and civic engagement first-hand. This special youth town hall featured an oral history conducted by Christopher W. Wilson, Director of the Program in African American Culture at the National Museum of American History, along with a question and answer session. It also included excerpts from the Museums Historic Theatre programs Sing for Freedom and the award-winning Join the Student Sit Ins. Xavier Carnegie, a talented young actor from the Museums historic theatre company who presents Join the Student Sit-Ins for the public, acted as the shows host.

  3. Michelle Obama to host DCCC fundraiser

    1/6/14 6:52 PM EST By ALEX ISENSTADT – POLITICO

    First lady Michelle Obama will host a fundraiser for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee in San Francisco later this month, according to an invitation obtained by POLITICO.

    Obama will appear with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) at the Fairmont Hotel for a “VIP reception and lunch” on Jan. 31 to help boost the DCCC. The committee is trying to erase the GOP’s 17-seat hold on the House. The event was originally to take place in October, but was postponed due to the government shutdown.

    For more: http://www.politico.com/story/2014/01/michelle-obama-dccc-fundraiser-101804.html

  4. I liked the way the movie “Lee Daniels’ The Butler” dealt with the sit-ins. Thanks for posting, Isaac

    • Hi isaac! It is a good thing that film/ tv producers are including historical civil rights events so that our youth learn about America’s past and NEVER let anything like it to repeat.

  5. Consumer Spending in U.S. Increases More Than Forecast

    Jan 31, 2014 5:47 AM PT By Shobhana Chandra – bloomberg

    Consumer spending in the U.S. climbed more than forecast in December even as incomes stagnated, showing the economy needs to generate bigger gains in employment to boost the expansion.

    Household purchases, which account for about 70 percent of the economy, rose 0.4 percent, after a 0.6 percent gain the prior month that was larger than previously estimated, Commerce Department figures showed today in Washington. The median projection of 81 economists in a Bloomberg survey called for a 0.2 percent rise. Incomes were unchanged, pushing the saving rate to the lowest level in almost a year.

    The report follows data yesterday that showed household spending rose in the fourth quarter at the fastest pace in three years, helping the economy overcome the fallout from the federal government shutdown. At the same time, absent bigger gains in pay, Americans will probably have difficulty sustaining the pickup into early 2014.

    The increase in consumer spending “is a good sign for sustaining economic growth,” said Guy LeBas, chief fixed income-strategist at Janney Montgomery Scott LLC in Philadelphia, who correctly projected the gain in spending. “Job creation will have to accelerate to sustain the current level of spending.”

    For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-01-31/consumer-spending-in-u-s-climbed-more-than-forecast-in-december.html

  6. 10:30 AM ET
    President Obama meets with CEOs
    The President is asking every business leader in America to help the long-term unemployed get into jobs because we are stronger when America fields a team at full strength.
    State Dining Room

    • CEOs Pledge Help to White House for Long-Term Unemployed

      Jan 31, 2014 9:29 AM PT By Roger Runningen and Mike Dorning – bloomberg

      President Barack Obama met today with chief executive officers of companies from Bank of America Corp. (BAC) to EBay Inc. who have committed to giving the long-term unemployed a better chance in the hiring process.

      More than 300 companies, including retail giant Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and automaker Ford Motor Co., have signed a pledge to develop initiatives for hiring and recruiting job-seekers who have been out of work for an extended period, according to the White House.

      Twenty-three corporate or small business leaders joined Obama and Vice President Joe Biden to discuss better job training and helping people who have been jobless for years to re-enter the workforce. Among today’s participants were Bank of America’s Brian Moynihan, EBay’s John Donahoe, Boeing Co. CEO James McNerney, James Gorman, CEO of Morgan Stanley (MS), and Arne Sorenson, CEO of Marriott International Inc.

      “Folks who’ve been unemployed the longest often have the toughest time getting back to work,” Obama said in remarks to the group in the East Room of the White House. “It’s a cruel Catch-22: The longer you’re unemployed, the more unemployable you may seem.”

      The president also signed an order directing federal agencies to end hiring practices that put the long-term unemployed at a disadvantage.

      For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-01-31/ceos-pledge-help-to-white-house-for-long-term-unemployed.html

  7. The White House has uploaded President Obama’s Lunar New Year Message

    President Obama’s Lunar New Year Message
    by The White House
    The President and First Lady send their best wishes to everyone celebrating the Lunar New Year. In this Year of the Horse, we hope that all of us can pursue opportunity and success. We wish you and your loved ones happiness, prosperity, and good health.

    • January 31, 2014

      Remarks by the President on Long-Term

      East Room

      11:39 A.M. EST

      THE PRESIDENT: (Applause.) Thank you. Thank you so much. Thank you, everybody. (Applause.) Everybody, please have a seat.

      Well, first of all, let me just thank Erick for being here, for sharing his story, for his service to our country. I hope that listening to Erick here, everybody recognizes what a great success story this is, but also the notion that somebody with this kind of skill and talent was having difficulty finding a job indicates the challenge that we face. And I want to thank all of you, business leaders, and philanthropists, elected officials, all levels and members of my Cabinet and the administration, not only for coming but for committing to more success stories for people like Erick, making sure that everybody in this country who wants to work has a chance to get ahead and not just get a paycheck, but also the dignity and the structure that a job provides people.

      On Tuesday, I delivered my State of the Union address. And I said what while the economy is getting stronger — and businesses like yours have created more than 8 million new jobs over the past four years, our unemployment rate is lower than it’s been in over five years — we all know we’ve still got a lot more to do to build an economy where everybody who is willing to work hard and take responsibility can get ahead. We’ve got to do more to restore opportunity for every American.

      And the opportunity agenda I laid out begins with doing everything we can to create new jobs here in America — jobs in construction and manufacturing; jobs in American innovation and American energy. There are steps we can take to streamline our tax code, to incentivize companies to invest here. There are things that we can do to make sure that we are continuing to lead the world in innovation and basic research. We’ve got a whole lot of infrastructure we can build that could put people to work right away. We’ve got a couple trillion dollars’ worth of deferred maintenance in America, and the ramifications of us taking that on would be significant. So we’ve got to grow faster and put more shoulders behind the wheel of expanding economic growth.

      Step two is making sure that every American has the skills to fill those jobs. Step three, we’ve got to guarantee every child access to a world-class education, from early childhood to college to a career. (Applause.) And step four, we’ve got to make sure that hard work pays off — with wages you can live on, savings you can retire on, health insurance that’s there for you when you need it.

      Today, we’re here to focus on that second point: connecting more ready-to-work Americans with ready-to-be-filled jobs, so that folks who are out of work can apply the skills that they’ve already got. And getting people back on the job faster is one of our top priorities. But I have to confess, last month, Congress made that harder by letting unemployment insurance expire for more than a million people. And each week that Congress fails to restore that insurance, roughly 72,000 Americans will join the ranks of the long-term unemployed who have also lost their economic lifeline.

      And for our fellow Americans who have been laid off, through no fault of their own, unemployment insurance is often the only source of income they’ve got to support their families while they look for a new job. So when Erick was out of work, it’s a lot harder to look for work if you can’t put gas in the gas tank, if you’re worried about whether there’s food on the table for your kid. If Mom isn’t making the rent and paying her phone bill, it’s a lot harder for her to follow up with a potential employer. Unemployment insurance provides that extra bit of security so that losing your livelihood doesn’t mean you lose everything that you’ve worked so hard to build. And that’s true whether you’ve been out of work for one month or six months.

      But folks who have been unemployed the longest often have the toughest time getting back to work. It’s a cruel Catch-22 -– the longer you’re unemployed, the more unemployable you may seem. Now, this is an illusion, but it’s one that unfortunately we know statistically is happening out there. According to one study, if you’ve been out of work eight months, you’re likely to get called back for an interview only about half as often as if you’ve been out of work one month — even with the identical résumé. So we are here tonight to say that’s not right — because we know there are folks like Erick, all across this country, who have enormous skills, enormous talents, enormous capacity. But they need a chance.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/01/31/remarks-president-long-term

    • January 31, 2014

      FACT SHEET: Opportunity For All – The President’s Call to Action to Give the Long-Term Unemployed a Fair Shot

      Year of Action: Making Progress Through Executive Action

      Today, following up on his call to action, the President is meeting with CEOs whose companies have agreed to take steps to help give the long-term unemployed a fair shot at a job, and will announce new steps to expand partnerships that connect the long-term unemployed to good jobs.

      * Partnering With Leading Companies to Give the Long-Term Unemployed a Fair Shot

      – New Best Practices for Hiring and Recruiting the Long-Term Unemployed

      Over 300 Hundred Companies Have Signed On.

      * Presidential Memorandum to Make Sure the Federal Government Does the Same

      * $150 Million for “Ready to Work” Partnerships That Support Innovative Public-Private Efforts to Help the Long-Term Unemployed Get a Fair Shot

      – Focus on Job Placement Assistance, Work-Based Training and Employer Engagement.

      * New Private Commitments to Scale Models That Help the Long-Term Unemployed

      Further Detail on Executive Actions the President Is Taking to Give the Long-Term Unemployed a Fair Shot

      * Partnering With Leading Companies to Give the Long-Term Unemployed a Fair Shot.

      – Long-Term Unemployed Are Frequently Overlooked in Recruiting and Hiring Practices

      – New Best Practices for Hiring and Recruiting the Long-Term Unemployed

      – Ensuring advertising does not discourage or discriminate against the unemployed

      – Reviewing screening and other recruiting procedures so that they do not intentionally or inadvertently disadvantage individuals based solely on their unemployment status

      – Using recruitment practices that cast a broad net and encourage all qualified candidates to apply

      – Sharing best practices for success in hiring the long-term unemployed within their companies and across their supply chains and the greater business community

      – Over 300 Hundred Companies Have Signed On

      – Additional Support for Human Resource Professionals in Implementing Best Practices

      * Presidential Memorandum to Make Sure the Federal Government Does the Same

      * $150 Million for “Ready to Work” Partnerships to Support Innovative Public-Private Efforts to Help the Long-Term Unemployed Get a Fair Shot

      – Focus on Reemploying Long-Term Unemployed Workers

      – Work-based Training That Enables Earning While Learning Through Models Such as On-the-Job Training (OJT), Paid Work Experience, Paid Internships and Registered Apprenticeships.

      – Employer Engagement and Support in Program Design – Including Programs That Commit to Consider Hiring Qualified Participants

      Continuing to Work With Congress on the President’s Existing Proposals to Get the Long-Term Unemployed Back to Work

      * Continuing to Work With Congress to Extend Emergency Unemployment Insurance for Americans Looking for Work

      * Working to Put in Place Job-Driven Training Programs that Connect the Long-Term Unemployed to Work

      New Private Commitments to Expand Models that Help the Long-Term Unemployed Get Back to Work

      * LinkedIn
      * Skills for America’s Future
      * National Fund for Workforce Solutions
      * Skills for Chicagoland’s Future
      * Per Scholas
      * Goodwill Industries
      * JPMorgan Chase
      * AARP Foundation
      * Platform 2 Employment
      * PG&E

      For the entire article: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/01/31/fact-sheet-opportunity-all-president-s-call-action-give-long-term-unempl

  8. 12:00 PM ET
    First Lady Michelle Obama attends “A Women’s Brunch” Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee fundraiser
    Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, CA

    • January 31, 2014

      Remarks by the First Lady at DNCC Women’s Luncheon

      Fairmont Hotel

      San Francisco, California

      11:45 A.M. PST

      MRS. OBAMA: Oh, my goodness. Thank you so much. (Applause.) Thank you all. It is great to be here. Thank you so much.

      Well, it is truly a pleasure to be here today with so many fabulous women — and a few brave men I see out there. (Laughter.) And speaking of fabulous women, I want to start by thanking Leader Nancy Pelosi not just for that kind introduction but for her outstanding and historic leadership in Congress. (Applause.) She is a fighter. She has courage. She’s willing to take the risks, and she has been behind our President every step of the way. We love you. We love your family. You are amazing. Thank you so much. (Applause.)

      And I also just want to mention that, as you know, Nancy was inducted into the Women’s Hall of Fame, and Barack and I could not be more proud. It is the right thing. That’s where you need to be. So keep it up, Nancy, we need you. Let’s give her another big round of applause. (Applause.) We love you.

      I also want to recognize the many terrific members of Congress who are joining us here today. You guys are doing a phenomenal job. Keep it up. Thank you for your leadership, your service. Thank you to your families for the sacrifices they make.

      And of course, I want to thank Joan Baez for gracing us with her performance. (Applause.) That was amazing. We are thrilled she could be here today.

      But most of all, I want to thank all of you for taking the time to be here today. And I want to thank you for everything that you’ve done for Barack and for so many other leaders who share our values. Thank you for being there for them year after year and election after election. And I know it feels like a long journey sometimes, I know that it hasn’t always been easy. But if you have ever wondered whether your support makes a difference, I just want you to think for a moment about what Barack said in his State of the Union speech earlier this week.

      I want you to think about the vision that he laid out for our future. Think about everything he’s asked Congress to help him achieve over the next three years: ending gun violence, raising the minimum wage, investing in job training and scientific research, opening the doors of pre-K for all of our children — and so much more. There’s so much work that needs to be done. (Applause.) And that is how your President wants to lift up the middle class and restore opportunity to everyone in this country.

      And make no mistake about it, when we talk about the 2014 midterm elections — and that’s what we are going to talk about a lot — elections that are less than 10 months away — please understand that that’s what’s at stake. And we need to ask ourselves whether we will have leaders in Congress who share our values and who will work with Barack to keep moving this country forward. And that’s why the midterm elections are so critical.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/01/31/remarks-first-lady-dncc-womens-luncheon

    • A Virtual Road Trip with President Obama

      Streamed live on Jan 31, 2014

      Join President Obama as he “travels” across the country in a virtual whistle-stop tour. The President will join Google+ Hangouts with people across the United States and talk with Americans about the issues laid out in his speech. RSVP now to watch the live Hangout on Friday, January 31.

  9. First Lady Michelle Obama attends Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee reception
    Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, CA

  10. West Wing Week 1/31/14 or, “West Wing Week Turns 200!”

    Published on Jan 31, 2014

    This anniversary episode, hosted by the President, coincides with this year’s State of the Union Address. We’ll take you behind the scenes and on the road to speak directly with Americans like you about your lives and your families, and how together we can make sure that every American who works and studies hard has a real chance to get ahead.

  11. WH

    Saturday, February 1, 2014

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
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    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
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  12. Today in History:

    February 1, 1865 – President Abraham Lincoln signs the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.

  13. WH

    Sunday, February 2, 2014

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
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    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
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    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    6:30 PM
    The First Family watches Superbowl XLVIII
    White House

    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  14. Weekly Address: Restoring Opportunity for All

    Remarks of President Barack Obama
    The White House

    February 1, 2014

    Hi, everybody.

    This week, I delivered my State of the Union Address. Today, here’s the three-minute version.

    After four years of economic growth with eight million new private sector jobs, our unemployment rate is the lowest it’s been in more than five years. And with the economy speeding up, companies say they intend to hire more people this year.

    But while those at the top are doing better than ever, average wages have barely budged. Inequality has deepened. Too many Americans are working harder and harder just to get by. And too many still aren’t working at all.

    Our job is to reverse those trends. It’s time to restore opportunity for all people – the idea that no matter who you are, if you work hard and live up to your responsibilities, you can make it if you try.

    The opportunity agenda I laid out on Tuesday has four parts. This week, I took them on the road.

    Job one is more new jobs: jobs in construction and manufacturing, jobs in innovation and energy.

    In Wisconsin, I talked with plant workers at GE about part two: training more Americans with the skills to fill those new jobs.

    In Tennessee, I talked with students about part three: guaranteeing every child access to a world-class education, from early childhood, through college, and right into a career.

    And with steelworkers in Pittsburgh, and retail workers in Maryland, I laid out part four: making sure hard work pays off for men and women, with wages you can live on, savings you can retire on, and health insurance that’s there for you when you need it.

    These ideas will strengthen the middle class and help more people work their way into the middle class. Some of them will require Congress. But wherever I can take steps to expand opportunity for more families on my own, I will. I’m going to ask business leaders, education leaders, and philanthropic leaders to partner with us to advance these goals.

    And every single day, I’m going to fight for these priorities – to shift the odds back in favor of more working and middle-class Americans, and to keep America a place where you can always make it if you try.

    Thanks. Have a great weekend. And enjoy the Super Bowl.

  15. White House goes to the dogs with Puppy Bowl

    January 28, 2014, 10:24 am By Justin Sink – TheHill

    First lady Michelle Obama, a group of elementary school students and the first dogs helped train participants in this year’s Puppy Bowl, the annual Animal Planet television show that airs each year on Super Bowl Sunday featuring puppies at play inside a model stadium.

    According to the network, 13 puppies joined Bo and Sunny on the South Lawn to run through drills and play fetch. The first lady participated in conjunction with her “Let’s Move!” initiative, with promotes healthier and more active lifestyles.

    “This year’s pups showed us that getting active and lapping up plenty of water are important ways to keep our bodies healthy and energized,” the first lady said in a statement. “And as our family has seen with Bo and Sunny, going outside to walk and play with your pet is a perfect way to get moving and have some fun every day.”

    The network will air footage from the training session starting at 3 p.m. on Super Bowl Sunday.

    The Puppy Bowl brought in 12.4 million viewers last Super Bowl Sunday, boosted by the half-hour power outage in the middle of the game.

    • Michelle Obama to do touchdown dance on ‘Puppy Bowl’ show

      Chicago Tribune Jan 28 11:01am

      WASHINGTON — If you want to see first lady Michelle Obama do a touchdown dance on Super Bowl Sunday, tune in to “Puppy Bowl X,” a spoof that airs beginning at 2 p.m. Chicago time on Animal Planet. http://www.animalplanet.com

  16. Sunday talk show tip sheet

    1/31/14 2:14 PM EST By TAL KOPAN – POLITICO

    “Meet the Press” on NBC
    • White House chief of staff Denis McDonough
    • Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.)
    • Julian Assange, founder, WikiLeaks
    • Former White House press secretary Robert Gibbs

    “Face the Nation” on CBS
    • McDonough
    • House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.)
    • Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani

    “This Week” on ABC
    • Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.), chairman, House Budget Committee

    “Fox News Sunday” on Fox
    • NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell

    “State of the Union” on CNN
    • Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal (R)

    “Political Capital” on Bloomberg TV
    • White House counselor John Podesta
    • Former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour (R)

    “Newsmakers” on C-SPAN
    • Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), chairwoman, Senate Agriculture Committee

    “Al Punto” on Univision
    • Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.)
    • Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli
    • Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis (D), gubernatorial candidate

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