2014 Indigenous Peoples’ Day

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Indigenous Peoples’ Day (also known as Native American Day) is a holiday celebrated in various localities in the United States, begun as a counter-celebration to Columbus Day. The purpose of the day is to promote Native American culture and commemorate the history of Native American peoples. The celebration began in Berkeley, California, and Denver, Colorado, as an alternative to Columbus Day, which is listed as a federal holiday in the United States but is not observed as a state holiday in every state. Indigenous Peoples’ Day is usually held on the second Monday of October, coinciding with federal observance of Columbus Day.

The idea of replacing Columbus Day with a day celebrating the indigenous people of North America first arose in 1977 from the International Conference on Discrimination Against Indigenous Populations in the Americas, sponsored by the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. In 1990, at the First Continental Conference on 500 Years of Indian Resistance in Quito, Ecuador, in July 1990, representatives of Indian groups throughout the Americas agreed that they would mark 1992, the 500th anniversary of the first of the voyages of Christopher Columbus, as a day to promote “continental unity” and “liberation”.

After the conference, attendees from Northern California organized to plan protests against the “Quincentennial Jubilee” that had been organized by the United States Congress for the San Francisco Bay Area on Columbus Day, 1992 to include, among other things, sailing replicas of Columbus’ ships under the Golden Gate Bridge and reenacting their “discovery” of America. The delegates formed the Bay Area Indian Alliance, and in turn, the “Resistance 500” task force, which advocated the notion that Columbus was responsible for genocide of Indian people.

In 1992 the group convinced the city council of Berkeley, California, to declare October 12, a “Day of Solidarity with Indigenous People”, and 1992 the “Year of Indigenous People”, and to implement related programs in schools, libraries, and museums. The city symbolically renamed Columbus Day to “Indigenous Peoples’ Day” beginning in 1992 to protest the historical conquest of North America by Europeans, and to call attention to the demise of Native American people and culture through disease, warfare, massacre, and forced assimilation. Performances were scheduled that day for Get Lost (Again) Columbus, an opera by a Native-American composer. Berkeley has celebrated Indigenous Peoples’ Day ever since. Beginning in 1993, Berkeley has held an annual pow wow and festival on the day.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_People%27s_Day

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List of Prominent Native Americans of the United States 

List of Prominent Native Hawaiians

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US Govt & Indigenous Peoples Timeline 1819-2016  – ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™

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Indigenous Peoples’ Day
October 13, 2014

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14 thoughts on “2014 Indigenous Peoples’ Day

  1. WH

    Monday, October 13, 2014

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama meets with senior members of the administration for a briefing on U.S. efforts to combat Ebola after tests revealed a second case in Dallas
    White House

    President Obama speaks by phone with UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon
    White House

    President Obama speaks by phone with French President Francois Hollande
    White House

    Vice President Biden attends a event for the DNC and former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist
    Miami, FL

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  2. Indigenous Peoples’ Day

    Indigenous Peoples’ Day (also known as Native American Day) is a holiday celebrated in various localities in the United States, begun as a counter-celebration to Columbus Day. The purpose of the day is to promote Native American culture and commemorate the history of Native American peoples. The celebration began in Berkeley, California, and Denver, Colorado, as an alternative to Columbus Day, which is listed as a federal holiday in the United States but is not observed as a state holiday in every state. Indigenous Peoples’ Day is usually held on the second Monday of October, coinciding with federal observance of Columbus Day.

    The idea of replacing Columbus Day with a day celebrating the indigenous people of North America first arose in 1977 from the International Conference on Discrimination Against Indigenous Populations in the Americas, sponsored by the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland. In 1990, at the First Continental Conference on 500 Years of Indian Resistance in Quito, Ecuador, in July 1990, representatives of Indian groups throughout the Americas agreed that they would mark 1992, the 500th anniversary of the first of the voyages of Christopher Columbus, as a day to promote “continental unity” and “liberation”.

    After the conference, attendees from Northern California organized to plan protests against the “Quincentennial Jubilee” that had been organized by the United States Congress for the San Francisco Bay Area on Columbus Day, 1992 to include, among other things, sailing replicas of Columbus’ ships under the Golden Gate Bridge and reenacting their “discovery” of America. The delegates formed the Bay Area Indian Alliance, and in turn, the “Resistance 500” task force, which advocated the notion that Columbus was responsible for genocide of Indian people.

    In 1992 the group convinced the city council of Berkeley, California, to declare October 12, a “Day of Solidarity with Indigenous People”, and 1992 the “Year of Indigenous People”, and to implement related programs in schools, libraries, and museums. The city symbolically renamed Columbus Day to “Indigenous Peoples’ Day” beginning in 1992 to protest the historical conquest of North America by Europeans, and to call attention to the demise of Native American people and culture through disease, warfare, massacre, and forced assimilation. Performances were scheduled that day for Get Lost (Again) Columbus, an opera by a Native-American composer. Berkeley has celebrated Indigenous Peoples’ Day ever since. Beginning in 1993, Berkeley has held an annual pow wow and festival on the day.

    For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigenous_People%27s_Day

    • 9 Teaching Resources That Tell the Truth About Columbus

      10/13/14 Christina Rose – indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com

      Finding good teaching materials for Columbus Day is like searching for a needle in a haystack. States and cities are increasingly recognizing Indigenous Peoples, but appropriate and readily available lesson plans have fallen behind the trend.

      The times they are a-changing for Christopher Columbus. In 1990, only three states failed to honor the genocidal and delusional navigator. The word is getting out, though, and this year, 16 states will not celebrate him. One by one, cities are also taking matters into their own hands. Seattle will now recognize Indigenous Peoples’ Day, following Minneapolis and San Francisco.

      But still, even reputable organizations like the National Education Association don’t offer a single online Columbus Day lesson plan we’d recommend. There are a few decent videos out there, but most of them say Natives came from Asia. Others gloss over the genocide as if worried about the delicate ears of the children they teach. But is it the children or the adults who feel the need to insulate their thin-skinned patriotism?

      Consider the thoughts of Wisconsin high school student, Savana Stuhl, 17, who said, “I was probably in fifth grade when my mom told me about Columbus. At first I didn’t believe her because at school he was called a hero, he found America, he came here first. Then my mother read me a book about the true story that he wasn’t the first one here.” Stuhl now feels even very young children should be told the truth. “I think younger kids could handle it. It is important they know he wasn’t a hero.”

      Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/10/13/9-teaching-resources-tell-truth-about-columbus-157311

      • Does Columbus Day Honor a Monster?

        October 13th, 2014 Dora Hasan Mekouar – VOAnews

        Every year, on the second Monday in October, the United States celebrates a federal holiday honoring a man who freely admitted committing atrocities against the native people of the Americas, including cutting off their hands, noses or ears to keep them in line, and sexually enslaving girls as young as nine, gifting them to his men.

        “There are plenty of dealers who go about looking for girls,” Christopher Columbus wrote in his journal in 1500. “Those from nine to ten are now in demand.”

        When Columbus arrived in the Bahamas (he never actually set foot in the contiguous United States) on Oct. 12, 1492, he noted the peaceful and hospitable nature of the native Arawaks, Lucayans and Taínos.

        “They were well-built, with good bodies and handsome features….They do not bear arms, and do not know them,” he wrote. “They would make fine servants….With fifty men we could subjugate them all and make them do whatever we want.”

        Which is exactly what he did. Columbus enslaved the natives, setting them to work in his gold mines. Those who didn’t collect enough of the valuable dust had their hands chopped off and tied around their necks to send a message to their fellow workers.

        For more: http://blogs.voanews.com/all-about-america/2014/10/13/does-columbus-day-honor-a-monster/

  3. Hi CR,

    I never knew there was an Indigenous People’s Day.

    This is something that should be wide spread and celebrated– to say the least. Thank you for getting the word out and helping us, esp the young people to keep moving towards a more-perfect-union.

    I read a quote somewhere that said, “Even though we haven’t reached the mountain top, we can’t stop climbing.”

    Thanks for the post, and Have a wonderful Indigenous People’s Day.

  4. Krugman: Obama among the most ‘successful presidents in American history’

    10/13/14 11:44AM By Steve Benen maddowblog

    Paul Krugman would never be mistaken for an Obama cheerleader. When President Obama was riding high, enjoying broad support and high poll numbers, it was Krugman who was discouraged, offering substantive criticism and words of caution. In late 2007, the then-senator’s campaign team was so irritated with Krugman that Obama’s aides dropped an oppo document on him.

    Six years later, it’s interesting to see how much the roles have reversed. The president’s support has clearly faltered. Much of the country either blames him for tumultuous events, refuses to credit him for national progress, or both. But it’s Krugman who’s come around — much of the American mainstream has turned on Obama, for reasons that may not be entirely rational, but it’s the Nobel laureate offering a spirited defense of the president in a Rolling Stone cover story.

    … Obama faces trash talk left, right and center – literally – and doesn’t deserve it. Despite bitter opposition, despite having come close to self-inflicted disaster, Obama has emerged as one of the most consequential and, yes, successful presidents in American history. […]

    This is what a successful presidency looks like. No president gets to do everything his supporters expected him to. FDR left behind a reformed nation, but one in which the wealthy retained a lot of power and privilege. On the other side, for all his anti-government rhetoric, Reagan left the core institutions of the New Deal and the Great Society in place. I don’t care about the fact that Obama hasn’t lived up to the golden dreams of 2008, and I care even less about his approval rating. I do care that he has, when all is said and done, achieved a lot. That is, as Joe Biden didn’t quite say, a big deal.

    Krugman’s piece goes into considerable detail — on the economy, on health care, on Wall Street reform, on climate — but the broader takeaway is that the New York Times columnist is saying what much of the country is not: that Obama’s presidency has been a great success. The praise is qualified at times, but it’s nevertheless enthusiastic.

    For more: http://www.msnbc.com/rachel-maddow-show/krugman-obama-among-the-most-successful-presidents-american-history

  5. October 13, 2014

    Readout of the President’s Meeting on the Domestic Preparedness and Response to Ebola

    The President met this afternoon with members of his public health and national security team to receive an update on the response to the diagnosis of a second Ebola case in Dallas, Texas. The President was briefed on the status of the investigation into the apparent breach in infection control protocols at the Dallas hospital and remedial actions underway to mitigate similar breaches in the future. Secretary Burwell and Dr. Frieden described the surge in personnel and other resources to Dallas to assist in the investigation as well as other measures to heighten awareness and increase training for healthcare workers throughout the country. The President reinforced that this investigation should proceed as expeditiously as possible and that lessons learned should be integrated into future response plans and disseminated to hospitals and healthcare workers nationwide.

  6. Vice President Biden attends a event for the DNC and former Florida Gov. Charlie Crist
    Miami, FL

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