2015 White House Conference on Aging

older WH Conf on Aging

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THE 2015 WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING

2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to recognize the importance of these key programs as well as to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.

In the past, conference processes were determined by statute with the form and structure directed by Congress through legislation authorizing the Older Americans Act. To date, Congress has not reauthorized the Older Americans Act, and the pending bill does not include a statutory requirement or framework for the 2015 conference.

However, the White House is committed to hosting a White House Conference on Aging in 2015 and intends to seek broad public engagement and work closely with stakeholders in developing the conference. We also plan to use web tools and social media to encourage as many older Americans as possible to participate. We are engaging with stakeholders and members of the public about the issues and ideas most important to older individuals, their caregivers, and families. We also encourage people to submit their ideas directly through the Get Involved section on this website.

THE ISSUES

The face of America is growing older and more diverse as the first baby boomers reached retirement age in 2011, accelerating a population surge in the number of Americans over the age of 65. Each day for the next 15 years, thousands more will reach retirement age, creating new opportunities for how we define what it means to be an older American. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging allows us to highlight the contributions of older adults today, and to shape the landscape of aging for the decade to come.

The President believes that older Americans are a tremendous national asset and has consistently worked to support their needs by, for example, strengthening Medicare and protecting Social Security. The White House Conference on Aging offers a unique opportunity to reflect on this work while looking forward to the next decade. We intend to use the year ahead to engage with older Americans, families, researchers, caregivers, leaders in the field of aging, and other stakeholders about the issues of most importance to them.

In our conversations to date, some common themes have emerged, including: how to ensure we prepare for financial needs in retirement; how to remain healthy as we age; what types of services and supports can help older Americans remain independent in the community as we age and how to support this care and the caregivers who provide it; and how to protect older Americans from financial exploitation, abuse, and neglect. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging provides an opportunity to listen to older Americans and engage with the American public about strategies to continue to maximize the contributions of older Americans to our country.

  • RETIREMENT SECURITY
  • HEALTHY AGING
  • LONG-TERM SERVICES AND SUPPORTS
  • ELDER JUSTICE

Learn more: http://whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov/

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Resources from the National Institute on Aging at NIH

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Q: What is a White House Conference on Aging?

A: The White House has held a Conference on Aging each decade since the 1960s to identify and advance actions to improve the quality of life of older Americans. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.

Q: When will the next White House Conference on Aging be held and what is its purpose?

A: The White House Conference on Aging will be held in 2015. 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to recognize the importance of these key programs as well as to look ahead to the next decade.

Q: How will the 2015 White House Conference on Aging be organized?

A: In the past, conference processes were determined by statute with the form and structure directed by Congress through legislation, as part of the authorization of the Older Americans Act.

At this point in time, Congress has not reauthorized the Older Americans Act, and the pending bill does not include a statutory requirement or framework for the Conference.

However, the White House is committed to convening the 2015 conference and we will seek broad public engagement and work closely with stakeholders in the lead-up to the conference. We also plan to use web tools and social media to encourage as many older Americans as possible to participate.

The Conference Web site www.WhiteHouseConferenceOnAging.gov provides regular updates on Conference activities. The website also provides opportunities for older Americans and leaders in the field of aging to provide their input and personal stories.

Q: How are issues being selected for the 2015 White House Conference on Aging?

A: We are engaging with stakeholders and members of the public about the issuesmost important to older individuals, their caregivers, and families. To listen and learn from key aging leaders and older Americans, the Administration is participating in listening sessions with older Americans and advocates across the country. These listening sessions began in July 2014 and will continue up to and during the Conference.

As we listen to aging leaders and older Americans, some of the common themes we hear include the following:

  • Retirement security is a vitally important issue. Financial security in retirement provides essential peace of mind for older Americans, but requires attention during our working lives to ensure that we are well prepared for retirement.
  • Healthy aging will be all the more important as baby boomers age. As medical advances progress, the opportunities for older Americans to maintain their health and vitality should progress as well and community supports, including housing, are important tools to promote this vitality.
  • Long-term services and supports remain a priority. Older Americans overwhelmingly prefer to remain independent in the community as they age. They need supports to do so, including a caregiving network and well-supported workforce.
  • Elder justice is important given that seniors, particularly the oldest older Americans, can be vulnerable to financial exploitation, abuse, and neglect. The Elder Justice Act was enacted as part of the Affordable Care Act, and we need to realize its vision of protecting seniors from scam artists and others seeking to take advantage of them.

Q: What activities are planned as we move forward to the 2015 White House Conference on Aging?

A: Monthly webinars for older adults, their families, stakeholders, and others, beginning in December of 2014, will examine the most important issues for older Americans. Additionally, a series of Regional Forums are being planned, and the Executive Director of the White House Conference on Aging is holding listening sessions with stakeholder groups across the country. The Conference website also features a regular blog that provides information and resources on topics of interest to older Americans, their families, caregivers, and others.

2015 WH Conference on Aging Tour

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THE 2015 WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING
Monday, July 13
10:00 AM – 5:00 PM ET

#WHCOA

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22 thoughts on “2015 White House Conference on Aging

  1. WH

    Monday, July 13, 2015

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    11:15 AM
    President Obama r delivers remarks at the 2015 White House Conference on Aging
    East Room

    12:00 PM
    12:30 PM
    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    Vice President Biden delivers remarks at the First U.S.-Ukraine Business Forum
    U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the Department of Commerce

    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    Vice President Biden delivers remarks on U.S.-India Relations at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Confederation of Indian Industry
    The Willard Hotel, Washington, DC

    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  2. THE 2015 WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING

    2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging is an opportunity to recognize the importance of these key programs as well as to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade.

    In the past, conference processes were determined by statute with the form and structure directed by Congress through legislation authorizing the Older Americans Act. To date, Congress has not reauthorized the Older Americans Act, and the pending bill does not include a statutory requirement or framework for the 2015 conference.

    However, the White House is committed to hosting a White House Conference on Aging in 2015 and intends to seek broad public engagement and work closely with stakeholders in developing the conference. We also plan to use web tools and social media to encourage as many older Americans as possible to participate. We are engaging with stakeholders and members of the public about the issues and ideas most important to older individuals, their caregivers, and families. We also encourage people to submit their ideas directly through the Get Involved section on this website.

    THE ISSUES

    The face of America is growing older and more diverse as the first baby boomers reached retirement age in 2011, accelerating a population surge in the number of Americans over the age of 65. Each day for the next 15 years, thousands more will reach retirement age, creating new opportunities for how we define what it means to be an older American. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging allows us to highlight the contributions of older adults today, and to shape the landscape of aging for the decade to come.

    The President believes that older Americans are a tremendous national asset and has consistently worked to support their needs by, for example, strengthening Medicare and protecting Social Security. The White House Conference on Aging offers a unique opportunity to reflect on this work while looking forward to the next decade. We intend to use the year ahead to engage with older Americans, families, researchers, caregivers, leaders in the field of aging, and other stakeholders about the issues of most importance to them.

    In our conversations to date, some common themes have emerged, including: how to ensure we prepare for financial needs in retirement; how to remain healthy as we age; what types of services and supports can help older Americans remain independent in the community as we age and how to support this care and the caregivers who provide it; and how to protect older Americans from financial exploitation, abuse, and neglect. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging provides an opportunity to listen to older Americans and engage with the American public about strategies to continue to maximize the contributions of older Americans to our country.

    * RETIREMENT SECURITY
    * HEALTHY AGING
    * LONG-TERM SERVICES AND SUPPORTS
    * ELDER JUSTICE

    Learn more: http://whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov/

    • July 13th: The White House Conference on Aging (WHCOA)

      Published on May 28, 2015

      The 2015 White House Conference on Aging will take place on Monday, July 13th. Find out how you can get involved: http://bit.ly/1IUFx4Z.

    • White House,White House Conference on Aging – Morning Session

      Published on Jul 13, 2015

      The White House hosts a Conference on Aging with senior Administration officials, community leaders, caregivers, older adults, families, advocates, and health and social service experts to discuss how we can improve the quality of life for older Americans. July 13, 2015.

    • July 13, 2015

      Remarks by the President at White House Conference on Aging

      East Room

      11:12 A.M. EDT

      THE PRESIDENT: Hello, everybody. (Applause.) Thank you so much. Thank you. (Applause.) Everybody, please have a seat. Welcome to the White House Conference on Aging, everybody. And please give Vicki a big round of applause for the outstanding work she’s doing to help women and families prepare for retirement. (Applause.)

      I want to thank the members of Congress who are here, those in my administration who’ve been working on this issue. I want to especially point out one of my favorite former members of Congress, a legend who’s here today — John Dingell. (Applause.) John, thank you.

      John was elected to Congress when he was just 29 — an over-achiever. Ten years later, he presided over the House chamber for the vote to pass Medicare into law — an achievement for which he and his father can take some credit. Last week, John turned 89 — so we want to wish John a happy birthday. He’s been a retiree for six months, but he’s keeping busy — just check out his Twitter feed if you don’t believe me. (Laughter.) So he’s still got some pretty strong opinions.

      It is wonderful to be here with all of you. Many of you have devoted your careers to advocating for older Americans. You understand the whole terrain — not just the challenges, but also the opportunities; not only the questions we’re asking today but the questions that we have to start thinking about for tomorrow. And because this conference takes place just once a decade, we’ve got to make it count.

      So one of the best measures of a country is how it treats its older citizens. And by that measure, the United States has a lot to be proud of. Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security are some of our greatest triumphs as a nation. When Social Security was signed into law, far too many seniors were living in poverty. When Medicare was created, only a little more than half of all seniors had some form of insurance. Before Medicaid came along, families often had no help paying for nursing home costs. Today, the number of seniors in poverty has fallen dramatically. Every American over 65 has access to affordable health care. And, by the way, since the Affordable Care Act was signed into law, the uninsured rate for all Americans has fallen by about one-third. (Applause.) Just thought I’d mention that. (Applause.)

      For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/07/13/remarks-president-white-house-conference-aging

  3. 7:00 PM ET
    Vice President Biden delivers remarks on U.S.-India Relations at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and the Confederation of Indian Industry
    The Willard Hotel, Washington, DC

    WhiteHouse.gov http://www.whitehouse.gov/live

  4. WH

    Tuesday, July 14, 2015

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

    7:00 AM
    President Obama Delivers a Statement on Iran
    State Floor

    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    First Lady Michelle Obama delivers remarks at The 2015 Girl Up Leadership Summit
    Washington D.C.

    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    1:05 PM
    President Obama departs the White House
    South Lawn

    1:20 PM
    President Obama departs Joint Base Andrews

    2:00 PM
    2:05 PM
    President Obama arrives Philadelphia
    Philadelphia International Airport

    3:00 PM
    3:05 PM
    President Obama addresses the 106th NAACP Annual Convention
    Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA

    4:00 PM
    4:10 PM
    President Obama participates in a DNC fundraiser
    Rittenhouse Hotel, Philadelphia, PA

    5:00 PM
    5:50 PM
    President Obama departs Philadelphia
    Philadelphia International Airport

    6:00 PM
    6:35 PM
    President Obama arrives Joint Base Andrews’

    6:50 PM
    President Obama arrives White House
    South Lawn

    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  5. July 14, 2015

    After many months of principled diplomacy, the P5+1 — the United States, the United Kingdom, France, China, Russia and Germany — along with the European Union, have achieved a long-term comprehensive nuclear deal with Iran that will verifiably prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon and ensure that Iran’s nuclear program will be exclusively peaceful going forward.

    This deal stands on the foundation of the Joint Plan of Action (JPOA), achieved in November of 2013, and the framework for this Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), announced in Lausanne on April 2, 2015 that set the requirements for the deal with the P5+ 1 and Iran, alongside the European Union announced today.

    For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/issues/foreign-policy/iran-deal

    • UN Security Council Approves Iran Nuclear Deal

      July 20, 2015 Victoria Macchi, Smita Nordwall, Chris Hannas – VOAnews

      WASHINGTON—
      The U.N. Security Council has unanimously endorsed the agreement Iran and a group of six world powers struck last week to limit the Iranian nuclear program in exchange for sanctions relief.

      The 15-member Council quickly voted Monday morning. The five permanent, veto-holding Council members are signatories to the agreement, so the resolution was expected to be adopted.

      Now that it has been passed, the deal goes into effect after no later than 90 days. The next key milestone comes after the U.N. nuclear watchdog – the International Atomic Energy Agency – issues a report, expected in December, on the resolution of past and present issues with Iran’s nuclear program. That is when Iran would see relief from the sanctions that have hurt its economy.

      The U.N. vote comes as U.S. lawmakers begin their own review of the agreement.

      President Barack Obama’s administration sent it to Congress on Sunday, setting off a 60-day review period. Lawmakers can choose to approve the deal or reject it and refuse to lift congressionally-imposed sanctions against Iran. Obama has said he would veto any rejection.

      For more: http://www.voanews.com/content/un-security-council-expected-to-approve-iran-nuclear-deal/2870048.html

  6. July 14, 2015

    Remarks by The First Lady at The Girl Up Leadership Summit

    The W Hotel
    Washington, D.C.

    11:23 A.M. EDT

    MRS. OBAMA: Hey! (Applause.) Look at you all! Are you excited? (Applause.) Well, rest yourselves.

    AUDIENCE MEMBER: We love you!

    MRS. OBAMA: I love you. I’m so proud. I’m so thrilled to be here today for this year’s Girl Up Leadership Summit! Look at you all! (Applause.) Wow! You all look amazing.

    Let me start by thanking Rocio for that wonderful introduction and for all of her work. She’s doing outstanding work, as I hear all of you are. I also want to thank Melissa Hillebrenner for her outstanding leadership of Girl Up, as well as Rich Parnell and the other senior leaders from the U.N. Foundation who are here today. Thank you all. Thank you for being here. Thank you for making this day possible.

    But most of all, I want to recognize all of you. I mean, you all are brilliant and passionate and powerful young women who are leading the Girl Up movement across the globe. Together, you guys have started, I understand, 1,000 clubs in more than 60 countries. That’s amazing. (Applause.) You’ve raised millions of dollars to empower tens of thousands of girls all across the world. And you’ve even gotten Congress to pass legislation on issues like child marriage and birth registration, and that’s a phenomenal feat.

    So really, that’s why I’m here today. I’m here because I want you all to know just how proud I am of everything you’ve achieved. It is amazing, and you all should just feel good inside. You’re just getting started, and look at all that you’ve accomplished.

    For more: https://wordpress.com/stats/day/propresobama.org

  7. PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA TO ADDRESS NAACP 106TH ANNUAL NATIONAL CONVENTION IN PHILADELPHIA

    July 01, 2015

    President Barack Obama will address the 106th NAACP Annual Convention in Philadelphia, PA on Tuesday, July 14, 2015 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center.

    “We are honored to welcome President Obama back to our NAACP national convention,” stated NAACP Chairman Roslyn M. Brock. “Our members are looking forward to President Obama delivering a powerful message that reinforces our commitment to being champions for civil and human rights in the 21st century.”

    This is the second time Mr. Obama will address the NAACP’s National Convention as President of the United States. The NAACP values the opportunity to hear from elected officials, government leaders and candidates for public office.

    For more: http://www.naacp.org/press/entry/president-barack-obama-to-address-naacp-106th-annual-national-convention-in

    #NAACP106

    • July 14, 2015

      Remarks by the President at the NAACP Conference

      Pennsylvania Convention Center
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

      4:54 P.M. EDT

      THE PRESIDENT: Hello, NAACP! (Applause.) Ah, it’s good to be back. (Applause.) How you all doing today? (Applause.) You doing fine?

      AUDIENCE: Yes!

      THE PRESIDENT: You look fine. (Applause.) All right, everybody have a seat. I got some stuff to say. (Applause.) I’ve got some stuff to say.

      AUDIENCE MEMBER: We love you!

      THE PRESIDENT: I love you back. You know that. (Applause.)

      So, see, now, whenever people have, like, little signs, you all got to write it bigger, because I’m getting old now. (Laughter.) And I like that picture of me. That’s very nice. Thank you. (Applause.)

      Let’s get something out of the way up front. I am not singing today.

      AUDIENCE: Awww —

      THE PRESIDENT: Not singing. Although I will say your board sang to me as I came in for the photograph. (Laughter.) So I know there’s some good voices in the auditorium.

      Let me also say what everybody knows but doesn’t always want to say out loud — you all would rather have Michelle here. (Laughter.) I understand. I don’t blame you. But I will do my best to fill her shoes. (Laughter.) And she sends everybody her love. And Malia and Sasha say hi, as well. (Applause.)

      I want to thank your chair, Roslyn Brock. I want to thank your president, Cornell Brooks. I want to thank your Governor, Tom Wolf, who’s doing outstanding work and was here. (Applause.) The Mayor of Philadelphia, Michael Nutter, who’s been a great friend and ally. (Applause.) Governor Dan Malloy of Connecticut, who’s here today. (Applause.) And some outstanding members of Congress who are here. I want to just say thank you to all of you for your love, for your support, but most importantly, for the work that you are doing in your communities all across the country every single day. (Applause.)

      It’s not always received with a lot of fanfare. Sometimes it’s lonely work; sometimes it’s hard work; sometimes it’s frustrating work. But it’s necessary work. And it builds on a tradition of this organization that reshaped the nation.

      For 106 years, the NAACP has worked to close the gaps between the words of our founding that we are all created equal, endowed by our Creator with certain unalienable rights — those words try to match those with the realities that we live each and every day.

      In your first century, this organization stood up to lynching and Jim Crow and segregation; helped to shepherd a Civil Rights Act and a Voting Rights Act. I would not be here, and so many others would not be here, without the NAACP. (Applause.)

      In your second century, we’ve worked together to give more of our children a shot at a quality education; to help more families rise up out of poverty; to protect future generations from environmental damage; to create fair housing; to help more workers find the purpose of a good job. And together, we’ve made real progress — including a My Brother’s Keeper initiative to give more young people a fair shot in life; including the passage of a law that declares health care is not a privilege for the few, but a right for all of us. (Applause.)

      For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/07/14/remarks-president-naacp-conference

  8. Release No: NR-272-15

    July 13, 2015 dod.gov

    Statement by Secretary of Defense Ash Carter on DOD Transgender Policy

    Over the last fourteen years of conflict, the Department of Defense has proven itself to be a learning organization. This is true in war, where we have adapted to counterinsurgency, unmanned systems, and new battlefield requirements such as MRAPs. It is also true with respect to institutional activities, where we have learned from how we repealed “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” from our efforts to eliminate sexual assault in the military, and from our work to open up ground combat positions to women. Throughout this time, transgender men and women in uniform have been there with us, even as they often had to serve in silence alongside their fellow comrades in arms.

    The Defense Department’s current regulations regarding transgender service members are outdated and are causing uncertainty that distracts commanders from our core missions. At a time when our troops have learned from experience that the most important qualification for service members should be whether they’re able and willing to do their job, our officers and enlisted personnel are faced with certain rules that tell them the opposite. Moreover, we have transgender soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines – real, patriotic Americans – who I know are being hurt by an outdated, confusing, inconsistent approach that’s contrary to our value of service and individual merit.

    Today, I am issuing two directives to deal with this matter. First, DoD will create a working group to study over the next six months the policy and readiness implications of welcoming transgender persons to serve openly. Led by (Acting) Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness Brad Carson, and composed of military and civilian personnel representing all the military services and the Joint Staff, this working group will report to Deputy Secretary of Defense Bob Work. At my direction, the working group will start with the presumption that transgender persons can serve openly without adverse impact on military effectiveness and readiness, unless and except where objective, practical impediments are identified. Second, I am directing that decision authority in all administrative discharges for those diagnosed with gender dysphoria or who identify themselves as transgender be elevated to Under Secretary Carson, who will make determinations on all potential separations.

    As I’ve said before, we must ensure that everyone who’s able and willing to serve has the full and equal opportunity to do so, and we must treat all our people with the dignity and respect they deserve. Going forward, the Department of Defense must and will continue to improve how we do both. Our military’s future strength depends on it.

  9. 4:10 PM ET
    President Obama participates in a DNC fundraiser
    Rittenhouse Hotel, Philadelphia, PA

  10. *******************
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