Medicare, Medicaid turns 50

Medicare Medicaid 50th


The Social Security Amendments of 1965Pub.L. 89–97, 79 Stat. 286, enacted July 30, 1965, was legislation in the United States whose most important provisions resulted in creation of two programs: Medicare and Medicaid. The legislation initially provided federal health insurance for the elderly (over 65) and for poor families.

History Many politicians were involved in drafting the final bill that was introduced to the United States Congress in March 1965. On July 30, 1965 President Lyndon B. Johnson (D) signed the bill into law.

The concept of national health insurance began in the early 20th century in the United States and then came to prominence during the Truman administration. Between 1958 and 1964, controversy grew and a bill was drafted. The signing of the act, as part of Johnson’s Great Society, began an era with a greater emphasis on public health issues. Medicare and Medicaid became the United States’ first public health insurance programs. The legislation was vigorously opposed by the American Medical Association until it had been enacted, following which the AMA cooperated in its implementation.

In 1912 Theodore Roosevelt included social insurance for sickness in the platform of his Progressive Party (United States, 1912). Around 1915 the group American Association for Labor Legislation attempted to introduce a medical insurance bill to some state legislatures. These attempts were not successful, and as a result controversy about national insurance came about. National groups supporting the idea of government health insurance included the AFL-CIO, the American Nurses AssociationNational Association of Social Workers, and the Socialist Party USA. The most prominent opponent of national medical insurance was the American Medical Association (AMA); others included the American Hospital Association, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Life Insurance Association of People.

Previous administrations

In 1935, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) signed the Social Security Act, medical benefits were left out of the bill. The committee that Roosevelt appointed to study issues related to Social Security wanted to include health insurance in the bill. However, the committee was concerned that amending the bill to include health insurance would kill the entire bill. Harry Truman took on the idea of national medical care and tried to integrate it into his Fair Deal program. Truman’s attempts were also unsuccessful, though during his presidency the fight for national medical care became specific to the aged population.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Security_Act_of_1965

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Medicare, Medicaid turns 50

As part of the 50th anniversary celebration for these programs, the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is collecting stories of how Medicare and Medicaid have made a difference for everyday Americans.

Please visit Medicare.gov/anniversary/share-your-story to share your Medicare or Medicaid story.

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Social Security Timeline: http://www.ssa.gov/history/1930.html

Medicare.gov – Nurshing Home Comparison

Learn more about Social Security: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/

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The 2015 White House Conference on Aging

THE 2015 WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE ON AGING

2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security. The White House held the Conference on Aging to discuss key programs as well as to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans for the next decade. In the past, conference processes were determined by statute with the form and structure directed by Congress through legislation authorizing the Older Americans Act. To date, Congress has not reauthorized the Older Americans Act, and the pending bill does not include a statutory requirement or framework for the 2015 conference.

THE ISSUES

The face of America is growing older and more diverse as the first baby boomers reached retirement age in 2011, accelerating a population surge in the number of Americans over the age of 65. Each day for the next 15 years, thousands more will reach retirement age, creating new opportunities for how we define what it means to be an older American. The 2015 White House Conference on Aging provided an opportunity to listen to older Americans and engage with the American public about strategies to continue to maximize the contributions of older Americans to our country.

* RETIREMENT SECURITY
* HEALTHY AGING
* LONG-TERM SERVICES AND SUPPORTS
* ELDER JUSTICE

Learn more: http://whitehouseconferenceonaging.gov/

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On the Horizon: The 2015 White House Conference on Aging

Cecilia Muñoz July 29, 2014 01:25 PM EDT

Today at the White House, I was delighted to host a roundtable discussion with leaders from across the aging community who came together to discuss the White House Conference on Aging, which will take place in 2015 – the 50th anniversary of Medicare, Medicaid, and the Older Americans Act, as well as the 80th anniversary of Social Security.

Just yesterday, the Medicare Trustees released their annual report finding that, since their report last year, the life of the Medicare Trust Fund has been extended by four additional years to 2030. When this Administration first took office, the Trust Fund was projected to go bankrupt more than a dozen years sooner, in 2017. The Trustees also project that – for the second year in a row – Part B premiums will not increase, allowing seniors to keep more of their Social Security cost-of-living increase.

Thanks in part to the Affordable Care Act, we have improved the affordability of the program, while at the same time helping Medicare work better for seniors. For example, we are closing the prescription drug coverage gap or “donut hole” to make medications more affordable for Medicare beneficiaries. Just today, we learned that 8.2 million seniors and people with disabilities saved $11.5 billion since 2010 – over $1,000 on average for people hitting the donut hole. Additionally, Medicare now provides coverage without cost-sharing for many preventive benefits to help keep older Americans healthy. The Affordable Care Act also responds to older Americans’ desire to remain independent in their communities by creating incentives for states to provide the services and supports that help people remain at home as they age.

For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2014/07/29/horizon-2015-white-house-conference-aging

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11 thoughts on “Medicare, Medicaid turns 50

  1. WH

    Wednesday, July 29, 2015

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    6:05 PM
    President Obama participates in a conference call with grassroots supporters to discuss the nuclear deal with Iran

    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  2. Medicare, Medicaid turns 50

    The Social Security Amendments of 1965, Pub.L. 89–97, 79 Stat. 286, enacted July 30, 1965, was legislation in the United States whose most important provisions resulted in creation of two programs: Medicare and Medicaid. The legislation initially provided federal health insurance for the elderly (over 65) and for poor families.

    History Many politicians were involved in drafting the final bill that was introduced to the United States Congress in March 1965. On July 30, 1965 President Lyndon B. Johnson (D) signed the bill into law.

    The concept of national health insurance began in the early 20th century in the United States and then came to prominence during the Truman administration. Between 1958 and 1964, controversy grew and a bill was drafted. The signing of the act, as part of Johnson’s Great Society, began an era with a greater emphasis on public health issues. Medicare and Medicaid became the United States’ first public health insurance programs. The legislation was vigorously opposed by the American Medical Association until it had been enacted, following which the AMA cooperated in its implementation.

    In 1912 Theodore Roosevelt included social insurance for sickness in the platform of his Progressive Party (United States, 1912). Around 1915 the group American Association for Labor Legislation attempted to introduce a medical insurance bill to some state legislatures. These attempts were not successful, and as a result controversy about national insurance came about. National groups supporting the idea of government health insurance included the AFL-CIO, the American Nurses Association, National Association of Social Workers, and the Socialist Party USA. The most prominent opponent of national medical insurance was the American Medical Association (AMA); others included the American Hospital Association, the Chamber of Commerce, and the Life Insurance Association of People.

    Previous administrations

    In 1935, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) signed the Social Security Act, medical benefits were left out of the bill. The committee that Roosevelt appointed to study issues related to Social Security wanted to include health insurance in the bill. However, the committee was concerned that amending the bill to include health insurance would kill the entire bill. Harry Truman took on the idea of national medical care and tried to integrate it into his Fair Deal program. Truman’s attempts were also unsuccessful, though during his presidency the fight for national medical care became specific to the aged population.

    For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Security_Act_of_1965

    • July 29, 2015

      Presidential Proclamation — 50th Anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid

      50TH ANNIVERSARY OF MEDICARE AND MEDICAID

      – – – – – – –

      BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

      A PROCLAMATION

      On July 30, 1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed Medicare and Medicaid into law. Fifty years later, these programs have been woven into the fabric of our society — cornerstones of the fundamental belief that in America, health care is a right and not a privilege. Today, Medicare and Medicaid help tens of millions of Americans live longer, healthier lives and achieve economic security. Together, they have helped protect the quintessential American promise that opportunity, prosperity, and economic mobility are within reach for everyone who works hard and plays by the rules. On this anniversary, we pause to celebrate these landmark achievements and reflect on the ways they have improved our Nation.

      As we commemorate two of America’s greatest triumphs, we must not forget that the security they provide was not always guaranteed, nor was their progress inevitable or their success preordained. Before Medicare and Medicaid, only about half of all seniors had some form of insurance, and too many of our most vulnerable citizens — including children and people with disabilities — did not have access to quality, affordable care.

      As a Nation, we chose to end that era. With hard work and determination, we fought to secure the health and peace of mind of millions of our people who previously lacked a basic measure of security. Medicare and Medicaid did not just make our country better; they reaffirmed its greatness and established a legacy that we must carry forward today. We must recognize that this work, though begun a half-century ago and continued over the decades that have followed, is not yet complete. For too many, quality, affordable health care is still out of reach — and we must recommit to finishing this important task.

      For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2015/07/30/presidential-proclamation-50th-anniversary-medicare-and-medicaid

    • 2020 Vision: Our Updated National HIV/AIDS Strategy

      Posted by Valerie Jarrett on July 30, 2015 at 10:15 AM EDT

      Today, the Obama Administration is releasing the National HIV/AIDS Strategy: Updated to 2020 (“Updated Strategy”). Since we released the nation’s first comprehensive HIV/AIDS strategy in 2010, we’ve made tremendous progress in the fight against HIV/AIDS. More people living with HIV know their status and are linked to care. We have better medications to treat the disease and better tools to prevent its transmission, like pre-exposure prophylaxis (“PrEP”) —a daily pill that can reduce a person’s risk of acquiring HIV by more than 90 percent when taken consistently.

      Yet, despite this progress, there is still an HIV epidemic in the U.S. Not only has there been a recent HIV outbreak among injection drug users in Indiana, there has also been a national increase in the number of diagnoses of HIV infection among young gay and bisexual men. This disease is preventable and if a person is infected, there are ways to drastically minimize transmission to others. Too many people living with HIV are unaware of their status or are diagnosed late. Many people may not realize that while being HIV-positive may once have been a death sentence, they can now live long, healthy lives with HIV if they are diagnosed and treated.

      There is a great discrepancy between the number of people who are diagnosed with HIV and those who are in care. Of the 1.2 million people living with HIV in the U.S., 87% (or about 1 million) of them know they have HIV, yet only 39% are engaged in care. This means that the majority of folks with HIV are not consistently getting the care they need to stay healthy and decrease their chances of transmitting HIV to others.

      Groundbreaking research is unlocking new tools and methods to help keep people in care, prevent and treat the disease, and find a cure. A critical part of making the best use of current investments and maximizing impact is to focus attention and resources on persons living with HIV infection and those who are at greatest risk for acquisition. That’s why the Updated Strategy’s update calls for a focus on the right people, the right places, and the right practices…right now.

      Learn about the five major changes to the strategy since 2010 here.

      For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2015/07/30/2020-vision-our-updated-national-hivaids-strategy

  3. U.S. GDP Rises 2.3% in Second Quarter; First Quarter Revised Upward

    July 30, 2015 by Sho Chandra – bloomberg

    The world’s largest economy expanded at a faster pace in the second quarter and managed to eke out a gain at the start of the year, painting a picture on incremental progress consistent with the Federal Reserve’s view.

    Gross domestic product rose at a 2.3 percent annualized rate, and a revised 0.6 percent advance in the first quarter wiped out a previously reported contraction, Commerce Department data showed Thursday in Washington. The median forecast of 80 economists surveyed by Bloomberg called for a 2.5 percent gain.

    Consumer spending grew more than projected, and price increases accelerated.

    The economy has moved beyond some of the early 2015 constraints including weather and port delays, while cooling global markets, a strong dollar and insufficient wage gains may continue to limit growth. Fed officials, considering when to begin raising rates this year, concluded on Wednesday that the U.S. is making progress.

    “We had better growth and better inflation in the first half,” said Eric Green, head of U.S. economic research at TD Securities in New York. “This should make the Fed feel more comfortable about raising rates this year.”

    For more; http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-07-30/u-s-economy-picked-up-in-second-quarter-after-better-2015-start

  4. West Wing Week: 07/31/15 or, “Jambo Kenya”

    Published on Jul 30, 2015

    Welcome to West Wing Week Dispatches, your guide to the President’s historic trip to East Africa. This week, the President became the first sitting U.S. President to visit Kenya, the first sitting U.S. President to visit Ethiopia, the first sitting U.S. President to address the African Union, and the first sitting U.S. President to visit with a 3.2 million year old Australopithecus. Along the way, the President met with the young people shaping Africa’s bright future, and sat down with the men and women leading these nations today. That’s July 24th to July 29th or “Jambo Kenya.”

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    Come on over to my newest post titled: ” GOP Leaders Kicks Duties Down the Road & Skips Town for Early Vacation″

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