Computer Science Education Week 2015

President Obama participates in an “Hour of Code” Event
President Obama participates in an “Hour of Code” Event

Computer Science Education Week

Computer Science Education Week (CSEdWeek) is an annual program dedicated to inspiring K-12 students to take interest in computer science.

Originally conceived by the Computing in the Core coalition, Code.org® is producing CSEdWeek for the first time this year, held in recognition of the birthday of computing pioneer Admiral Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906).

Learn more: https://csedweek.org/about

Computer Science Education Week 2015

Hour of Code challenge

During Computer Science Education Week from December 9 to December 15, 2013, Code.org launched the “Hour of Code Challenge” on its website to teach computer science to school students, enticing them to complete short programming tutorials. The challenge involved getting people to write short snippets of code to achieve pre-specified goals using Blockly, a visual programming language of a similar flavor as Logo. The initiative had been announced about two months in advance. At the time of launch, the initiative was supported by United States President Barack Obama as well as leaders of many technology companies such as Microsoft and Apple Inc.. About two weeks later, it was announced that over 20 million people had participated and over 600 million lines of code had been written as part of the challenge.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code.org#Hour_of_Code_challenge

 

“I’m proud to join the students, teachers, businesses, and non-profit organizations taking big new steps to support computer science in America’s schools. Learning these skills isn’t just important for your future – it’s important for our country’s future. If we want America to stay on the cutting edge, we need young Americans like you to master the tools and technology that will change the way we do just about everything.”

President Obama, December 2013, on Computer Science Education Week

Computer Science Education Week – Facebook

Computer Science Education Week – Twitter

Computer Science Education Week
December 7-13, 2015

#HourOfCode

Hack for good not evil
Hack for good not evil

#WhiteHat

#CSForAll

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9 thoughts on “Computer Science Education Week 2015

  1. WH

    Tuesday, December 8, 2015

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    Vice President Biden addresses the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine
    Ukrainian Club Building, Kyiv, Ukraine

    Vice President Biden departs Kyiv, Ukraine en route Washington D.C.

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    12:30 PM
    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM

    3:05 PM
    President Obama meets with Secretary of Defense Carter

    4:00 PM
    4:40 PM
    President Obama participates in a DNC Roundtable event
    The Jefferson Hotel, Washington DC

    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  2. Hour of Code challenge

    During Computer Science Education Week from December 9 to December 15, 2013, Code.org launched the “Hour of Code Challenge” on its website to teach computer science to school students, enticing them to complete short programming tutorials. The challenge involved getting people to write short snippets of code to achieve pre-specified goals using Blockly, a visual programming language of a similar flavor as Logo. The initiative had been announced about two months in advance. At the time of launch, the initiative was supported by United States President Barack Obama as well as leaders of many technology companies such as Microsoft and Apple Inc.. About two weeks later, it was announced that over 20 million people had participated and over 600 million lines of code had been written as part of the challenge.

    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code.org#Hour_of_Code_challenge

    ————

    Code.org

    Launched in 2013, Code.org® is a non-profit dedicated to expanding participation in computer science by making it available in more schools, and increasing participation by women and underrepresented students of color. Our vision is that every student in every school should have the opportunity to learn computer science. We believe computer science and computer programming should be part of the core curriculum in education, alongside other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses, such as biology, physics, chemistry and algebra.

    For more: http://code.org

    • President Obama kicks off the Hour of Code 2014

      Published on Dec 7, 2014

      On the 1 year anniversary of the first Hour of Code, over 50 million students have tried the Hour of Code. President Obama kicks off the 2014 Computer Science Education Week with a new call to motivate students worldwide to try the Hour of Code.

      FACT SHEET: New Commitments to Support Computer Science Education

      “I’m proud to join the students, teachers, businesses, and non-profit organizations taking big new steps to support computer science in America’s schools. Learning these skills isn’t just important for your future – it’s important for our country’s future. If we want America to stay on the cutting edge, we need young Americans like you to master the tools and technology that will change the way we do just about everything.”

      — President Obama, December 2013, on Computer Science Education Week

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/12/08/fact-sheet-new-commitments-support-computer-science-education-0

    • Celebrating Computer Science Education Week, Kids Code at the White House

      Megan Smith and Danielle Carnival December 08, 2014 08:31 AM EST

      Today – on the first day of 2014 Computer Science Education Week (#CSEdWeek) – President Obama is welcoming approximately 30 middle-school-aged students from Newark, NJ, and Brooklyn, NY, to roll up their sleeves, get online together, and participate in an “Hour of Code” here at the White House. These students will join millions of people around the world who are participating in similar Hour of Code events this week to get familiar with the basics of computer programming through innovative online tutorials for learners of all ages.

      Recognizing the importance of connecting America’s students with tech-skills that are increasingly relevant to how we live, work, learn, play, and create, President Obama issued a call during last year’s CSEdWeek to the education community, businesses, foundations, and non-profit organizations to help support and expand access to computer science education in K-12 schools.

      For more: http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2014/12/08/celebrating-computer-science-education-week-kids-code-white-house

    • Leadership and Policy Hackathon

      Published on Jul 31, 2015

      The White House and the Department of Education host a youth leadership development and policy workshop for 100 youth leaders and staff, July 31, 2015.

  3. The world reacts to Trump’s proposed ban on Muslims entering U.S.

    December 8 at 9:44 AM By Annie Gowen – washingtonpost

    NEW DELHI — Leading U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s call for a complete ban on Muslims entering the United States was widely condemned around the world Tuesday.

    Citizens, commentators and politicians slammed Trump’s latest controversial statement, calling it hate speech and a disturbing sign of Islamophobia in a country rattled in recent weeks by large-scale terror attacks in Paris and San Bernardino, Calif.

    The billionaire developer and reality television star released a statement Monday calling for “a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country’s representatives can figure out what is going on.”

    Later Monday, Trump, 69, read the statement out loud at a rally in Charleston, S.C., where an enthusiastic crowd greeted him with cheers and chants of “Trump! Trump!” and “U.S.A.! U.S.A.!”

    “We have no choice. We have. No. Choice,” Trump said, with a shake of his head. His statement may be politically incorrect, he said, “but I don’t care!”

    The heated rhetoric left many Muslims feeling bewildered, scared and angry. In Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley, for example, Syrians stranded in overcrowded, cold refugee camps said they worried that rising xenophobia could further complicate their hopes of seeking asylum in the United States.

    “How can a country that always talks about human rights and freedom do this or even consider this?” said Bourhan Salem, 32, who fled to the Bekaa to escape the violence around his home in Syria’s Daraa province. “Do they know what we have suffered?”

    Dar al-Ifta, Egypt’s official religious body, issued a statement that condemned Trump for “hate rhetoric” that “will increase tension” in the United States, which is home to millions of Muslims who are “peaceful and loyal American citizens.”

    And in Kabul, a property dealer named Timur Shah said Americans need to “rise up” and prevent Trump from becoming their leader.

    “None of us deserve him. What he says is harmful for all of us and will help the Islamic State and fanatics on all sides,” Shah said.

    In France, where the ruling Socialists are in a pitched election battle with a far-right anti-immigrant party, Prime Minister Manuel Valls on Tuesday wrote on Twitter that “Trump, like others, stokes hatred and conflations: our ONLY enemy is radical Islamism.”

    Valls’s implicit comparison was with the National Front party, which is poised to seize power in local legislatures around France in runoff elections on Sunday. National Front leader Marine Le Pen has seized on fears of Muslims and terrorism to create a potent ballot-box force even as mainstream voices in France have promoted moderation.

    In Britain, Prime Minister David Cameron joined British politicians from all parties in condemning Trump’s remarks. While it is rare for a British prime minister to comment on contenders in the U.S. presidential race, Cameron’s spokeswoman said he “completely disagrees” with Trump’s comments, which he regards as “divisive, unhelpful and quite simply wrong.”

    Cameron’s spokeswoman told reporters: “The prime minister has been very clear that, as we look at how we tackle extremism and this poisonous ideology, what politicians need to do is look at ways they can bring communities together and make clear that these terrorists are not representative of Islam and indeed what they are doing is a perversion of Islam.”

    When asked if Cameron would be willing to meet Trump or whether he could be banned from Britain, his spokeswoman declined to answer, saying the questions were “hypothetical.”

    Trump’s call also drew reactions from journalists and editorial writers throughout Europe and in Israel, where he is due to arrive for a visit later this month. Israeli columnist Chemi Shalev said the sight of the crowds cheering Trump evoked the early days of Nazi Germany.

    “For some Jews, the sight of thousands of supporters waving their fists in anger as Trump incited against Muslims and urged a blanket ban on their entry to the United States could have evoked associations with beer halls in Munich a century ago,” Shalev wrote in the Israeli daily newspaper Haaretz.

    Trump’s comments were widely covered in the European media, with many outlets wondering if he went too far this time. The German daily Süddeutsche Zeitung ran an editorial with the headline, “How Donald Trump is betraying America.”

    London’s Daily Telegraph newspaper called the statement a “bombshell” even by Trump’s standards. The Guardian wrote that he was “further out of the mainstream than he has been at any point since announcing his candidacy.”

    Trump’s comment garnered worldwide reaction on social media as well.

    In Brazil, acclaimed journalist Patricia Campos Mello shared a Slate story on Trump on her Facebook page and commented: “There is no way for this guy to get more dumb.” One of the commenters responded, “There is, wait and see.”

    One Saudi Arabian woman, Naveen Malek, said in a tweet: “We are facing a Third World War these days. The new leaders of intolerance are people such as Trump and the French far-right.”

    Trump has bolstered his popularity with a series of increasingly controversial remarks — on women, Hispanic immigrants, the disabled and Muslims. Yet he has remained solidly atop national polls among Republican presidential candidates since July, according to Real Clear Politics, except for a brief period in early November when he and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson were in a statistical dead heat.

    Conventional political wisdom long expected him to fade from the race after an early peak, but he was defied such theories so far, prompting one Republican political operative to write a memo earlier this month detailing “the Trump phenomenon” and urging Republican candidates to adopt the “best elements” of his “anti-populist agenda.”

    “Trump has given voice to the rhetoric of hatred which has always been in the American society in some form or another. Sometimes the hatred is for blacks, sometimes for communists. Today it is Muslims,” said Shahid Siddiqui, a former member of parliament in India, who edits the Nai Duniya Urdu newspaper and is the co-founder of a group called Inter-Faith Peace Foundation.

    “Now that he has brought out the worst, it will be fought by all that is good in American society and democracy,” Siddiqui said. “Words of hatred should not just remain under the skin. If the boil has erupted, it will surely be countered by Americans themselves.”

    Source: https://goo.gl/unfBNC

  4. 4:40 PM ET
    President Obama participates in a DNC Roundtable event
    The Jefferson Hotel, Washington DC

  5. *******************
    THIS POST IS NOW CLOSED NBLB

    Come on over to my newest post titled: ”The World Reacts to Trump’s Proposed Ban on Muslims ″

    ********************

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