Zika Virus

Zika 101

Summary:
The Zika virus is spread to people through the bite of infected mosquitos. About 1 in 5 people who get infected with Zika virus will show symptoms.

In the past several weeks, increased cases of Zika virus disease (Zika) have been reported in South and Central America, and to a limited degree in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, a US territory, and the US Virgin Islands.  Zika is a little known illness spread by a certain type of mosquito. Although most people who may be exposed to Zika virus will have only mild or no symptoms, there has been evidence linking Zika virus to negative effects on pregnancies in some cases, which has received widespread public attention. We understand that this news is concerning, especially to pregnant women and their families who may travel to or live in affected areas. Here are some answers to common questions about Zika.

What is Zika?

The Zika virus is spread to people through the bite of infected mosquitos. About 1 in 5 people who get infected with Zika virus will show symptoms. Most of those who get sick experience only mild symptoms that last about a week. The most common symptoms are fever, rash, joint pain, and red eyes (conjunctivitis). It’s rare for someone infected with Zika to become seriously sick or die. Zika is not spread through routine direct person-to-person contact.

Zika and Pregnancy

While anyone can be infected with Zika, what makes it stand out from other mosquito-borne illnesses, is the effect it appears to have on pregnancy. We know that Zika can spread from a pregnant mother to her baby, and that infection during pregnancy may be linked to birth defects, such as a condition called microcephaly (when a baby’s head is smaller than expected when compared with babies of the same sex and age). Our understanding of the link between Zika and pregnancy is evolving.

Because of the possible risk to unborn babies, CDC recommends that women who are pregnant or trying to become pregnant consider postponing travel to areas with local Zika transmission. If you are pregnant and must travel to one of these areas, talk to your healthcare provider first and strictly follow steps to prevent mosquito bites. As we learn more about this disease, our guidance may change based on new information important for the public to know.

How to Protect Yourself from Zika

Because there are currently no vaccines or treatment for Zika, the best way to protect yourself is to prevent mosquito bites. You can do this by wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants and treating your clothing and other items with permethrin. Use an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellant as directed. You shouldn’t use insect repellant on babies younger than 2 months of age; instead, dress your baby in clothing that covers arms and legs and cover the crib, stroller, or baby carrier with mosquito netting.

If you’ve recently traveled to an area with Zika and develop a rash, joint pain, or red eyes, tell your doctor that you traveled to a country with Zika virus. Because the symptoms of Zika are similar to dengue and chikungunya, special blood tests may be needed.

If you get sick with Zika, make sure to get plenty of rest and fluids, and take medicines like acetaminophen or paracetamol to reduce fever and pain. Don’t take aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen. You can also prevent others from getting sick by avoiding mosquito bites during the first week of illness following the same steps outlined above, because Zika virus can stay in the blood during the first week of infection.

 

For more: http://www.hhs.gov/blog/2016/01/28/zika-101.html

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Guillain-Barre on rise in 5 Latam countries, no proven link to Zika – WHO

Sat Feb 13, 2016 5:28am EST GENEVA | BY STEPHANIE NEBEHAY – reuters

A neurological disorder suspected of links to the mosquito-borne Zika virus is on the rise in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Suriname and Venezuela, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Saturday.

The rare Guillain-Barre syndrome, in which the body’s immune system attacks part of the nervous system, causes gradual weakness in the legs, arms and upper body and sometimes leads to total paralysis.

“In the context of the Zika virus outbreak, Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador, Suriname and Venezuela have reported an increase of GBS (Guillain-Barre Syndrome),” the WHO said in a weekly report on Zika virus now circulating in 34 countries, including 26 in the Americas.

“The cause of the increase in GBS incidence observed in Brazil, Colombia, El Salvador and Suriname remains unknown, especially as dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus have all been circulating simultaneously in the Americas,” it added.

Investigations continue to determine the cause, WHO said, noting that there was no laboratory confirmation of Zika virus in patients with GBS in Colombia and El Salvador.

Venezuela has reported 252 cases of Guillain-Barre occurring at the same time and place as Zika infections, it said. “Zika virus infection was confirmed for three of the GBS cases, including one fatal case.”

Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro said on Thursday that three people had died of complications linked to Zika virus and that suspected cases of Zika had risen to 5,221.

Even in the best of settings, 3 to 5 percent of Guillain-Barre patients die from complications, which can include paralysis of the muscles that control breathing, blood infection, lung clots or cardiac arrest, according to the WHO.

For more: http://www.reuters.com/article/health-zika-who-guillain-barre-idUSKCN0VM0BO?virtualBrandChannel=11563

White House Response To The Zika Virus

The Zika virus is a disease spread primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito — the same type of mosquito that spreads other viruses like dengue and chikungunya.

While most people have no symptoms as all, Zika causes mild illness in some. However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has established a link between Zika infection during pregnancy and serious birth defects and other poor pregnancy outcomes. We also know that there can be other serious neurological impacts in some people who are infected with Zika.

We are closely tracking and responding to outbreaks of this virus across the Americas. While we haven’t seen Zika transmission by mosquitoes in the continental United States to date, we have seen transmission in Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and American Samoa, in addition to cases reported in Mexico, Central and South America, the Caribbean, and the Pacific Islands.

And we know that this particular mosquito lives in certain parts of the southern United States, and we now know that Zika can also spread in another type of mosquito that is present throughout much of the United States. So now is the time to prepare as the seasons change and weather gets warmer.

As President Obama said, we all have to remain vigilant when it comes to combating the spread of diseases like Zika. That’s why the President has called on Congress to provide emergency funding to combat this disease, including to:

  • speed the development of a vaccine;
  • allow people – especially pregnant women – to more easily get tested and get a prompt result; and
  • ensure that states and communities – particularly those in the South that have experienced local outbreaks of dengue and chikungunya in the past – have the resources they need to fight the mosquito that carries this virus.

Congress needs to act now to ensure that we have the resources we need to take every step necessary to protect the American people from the Zika virus.

For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/zika

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Centers For Disease Control & PreventionCDC.gov

 

 

WHO Director-General summarizes the outcome of the Emergency Committee on Zika

WHO statement on the first meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee on Zika virus and observed increase in neurological disorders and neonatal malformations

1 February 2016

 

I convened an Emergency Committee, under the International Health Regulations, to gather advice on the severity of the health threat associated with the continuing spread of Zika virus disease in Latin America and the Caribbean. The Committee met today by teleconference.

In assessing the level of threat, the 18 experts and advisers looked in particular at the strong association, in time and place, between infection with the Zika virus and a rise in detected cases of congenital malformations and neurological complications.

The experts agreed that a causal relationship between Zika infection during pregnancy and microcephaly is strongly suspected, though not yet scientifically proven. All agreed on the urgent need to coordinate international efforts to investigate and understand this relationship better.

The experts also considered patterns of recent spread and the broad geographical distribution of mosquito species that can transmit the virus.

The lack of vaccines and rapid and reliable diagnostic tests, and the absence of population immunity in newly affected countries were cited as further causes for concern.

After a review of the evidence, the Committee advised that the recent cluster of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders reported in Brazil, following a similar cluster in French Polynesia in 2014, constitutes an “extraordinary event” and a public health threat to other parts of the world.

In their view, a coordinated international response is needed to minimize the threat in affected countries and reduce the risk of further international spread.

Members of the Committee agreed that the situation meets the conditions for a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.

For more: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/statements/2016/emergency-committee-zika-microcephaly/en/

#Zika

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26 thoughts on “Zika Virus

  1. WH

    Monday, February 1, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

    7:00 AM
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    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    11:45 AM
    President Obama meets with Health & Human Services Secretary Burwell
    Oval Office

    12:00 PM
    12:30 PM
    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    President Obama meets the White House Task Force on Cancer
    Vice President’s Ceremonial Office, Eisenhower Executive Office Building

    3:00 PM
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  2. The Zika Virus: What You Need to Know

    JANUARY 28, 2016 AT 9:01 AM ET BY AMY POPE

    Summary: Here are a few answers to some questions that many Americans may have about the Zika disease and who it could impact.

    If you’ve been thinking about traveling to warmer climates or have been catching a few news stories, you may have heard about something called the Zika virus — a disease spread primarily through mosquito bites.

    Zika causes mild illness in some, however, we are closely tracking and responding to recent outbreaks of this virus because the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issued reports that indicate Zika may be linked to serious birth defects in babies of mothers who were infected with this virus while pregnant.

    While this virus is not new, it is new to the Americas. The first case was reported in Brazil just last spring. Since that time, it has spread through South and Central America, and the Caribbean. No locally transmitted Zika cases from mosquitoes have been reported in the continental U.S., but cases have been reported in travelers returning from areas where Zika is present. As Zika continues to spread in our region, the number of cases among travelers visiting or returning to the U.S. is likely to increase.

    As a mother, I know how important it is to have all the information you need to keep yourself and your family healthy and safe. There is still much we don’t know about this virus. To help keep you up-to-date as we learn more, we have all the latest updates you need in one place: http://www.cdc.gov/Zika.

    For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/01/27/zika-virus-what-you-need-know

    • January 26, 2016

      Readout of the President’s Meeting on Zika Virus

      The President met today with leaders of his health and national security teams to discuss the spread of Zika and other mosquito-borne viruses in the Americas as well as steps being taken to protect the American public. The President’s senior health advisors, including Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell, Centers for Disease Control Director Dr. Thomas Frieden, and NIH/NIAID Director Dr. Anthony Fauci, briefed him on the factors that could affect the potential spread of the Zika virus in the United States, as well as recently issued travel advisories and guidance for domestic health care providers who care for pregnant women. The President was briefed on the potential economic and development impacts of the Zika virus spreading in the Western Hemisphere. The President emphasized the need to accelerate research efforts to make available better diagnostic tests, to develop vaccines and therapeutics, and to ensure that all Americans have information about the Zika virus and steps they can take to better protect themselves from infection.

    • WHO Director-General summarizes the outcome of the Emergency Committee on Zika

      WHO statement on the first meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee on Zika virus and observed increase in neurological disorders and neonatal malformations

      1 February 2016

      I convened an Emergency Committee, under the International Health Regulations, to gather advice on the severity of the health threat associated with the continuing spread of Zika virus disease in Latin America and the Caribbean. The Committee met today by teleconference.

      In assessing the level of threat, the 18 experts and advisers looked in particular at the strong association, in time and place, between infection with the Zika virus and a rise in detected cases of congenital malformations and neurological complications.

      The experts agreed that a causal relationship between Zika infection during pregnancy and microcephaly is strongly suspected, though not yet scientifically proven. All agreed on the urgent need to coordinate international efforts to investigate and understand this relationship better.

      The experts also considered patterns of recent spread and the broad geographical distribution of mosquito species that can transmit the virus.

      The lack of vaccines and rapid and reliable diagnostic tests, and the absence of population immunity in newly affected countries were cited as further causes for concern.

      After a review of the evidence, the Committee advised that the recent cluster of microcephaly cases and other neurological disorders reported in Brazil, following a similar cluster in French Polynesia in 2014, constitutes an “extraordinary event” and a public health threat to other parts of the world.

      In their view, a coordinated international response is needed to minimize the threat in affected countries and reduce the risk of further international spread.

      Members of the Committee agreed that the situation meets the conditions for a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.

      For more: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/statements/2016/emergency-committee-zika-microcephaly/en/

      WHO: Director-General Dr. Margaret Chan briefs Executive Board on Zika situation 28JAN2016

      Published on Feb 1, 2016

      WHO Director-General briefs Executive Board on Zika situation

      • February 08, 2016

        FACT SHEET: Preparing for and Responding to the Zika Virus at Home and Abroad

        Since late last year, the Administration has been aggressively working to combat Zika, a virus primarily spread by mosquitoes that has recently been linked to birth defects and other concerning health outcomes. The Federal Government has been monitoring the Zika virus and working with our domestic and international public health partners to alert healthcare providers and the public about Zika; provide public health laboratories with diagnostic tests; and detect and report cases both domestically and internationally.

        The Administration is taking every appropriate measure to protect the American people, and today announced that it is asking Congress for more than $1.8 billion in emergency funding to enhance our ongoing efforts to prepare for and respond to the Zika virus, both domestically and internationally. The Administration will submit a formal request to Congress shortly.

        The Pan American Health Organization reports 26 countries and territories in the Americas with local Zika transmission. While we have not yet seen transmission of the Zika virus by mosquitoes within the continental United States, Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories in warmer areas with Aedes aegpyti mosquito populations are already seeing active transmission. In addition, some Americans have returned to the continental U.S. from affected countries in South America, Central America, the Caribbean and the Pacific Islands with Zika infections. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports 50 laboratory-confirmed cases among U.S. travelers from December 2015- February 5, 2016. As spring and summer approach, bringing with them larger and more active mosquito populations, we must be fully prepared to mitigate and quickly address local transmission within the continental U.S., particularly in the Southern United States.

        The requested resources will build on our ongoing preparedness efforts and will support essential strategies to combat this virus, such as rapidly expanding mosquito control programs; accelerating vaccine research and diagnostic development; enabling the testing and procurement of vaccines and diagnostics; educating health care providers, pregnant women and their partners; improving epidemiology and expanding laboratory and diagnostic testing capacity; improving health services and supports for low-income pregnant women, and enhancing the ability of Zika-affected countries to better combat mosquitoes and control transmission.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/02/08/fact-sheet-preparing-and-responding-zika-virus-home-and-abroad

    • 11:45 AM ET
      President Obama meets with Health & Human Services Secretary Burwell
      Oval Office

  3. National Freedom Day

    National Freedom Day is a United States observance on February 1 honoring the signing by Abraham Lincoln of a joint House and Senate resolution that later became the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. President Lincoln signed the Amendment outlawing slavery on February 1, 1865, although it was not ratified by the states until later.

    Major Richard Robert Wright Sr., a former slave, believed that there should be a day when freedom for all Americans is celebrated. While living in Philadelphia towards the end of his life, he invited local and national leaders to meet to organize a movement for a national holiday to commemorate Lincoln’s signing of the 13th Amendment. The resulting National Freedom Association proposed having a memorial date to call attention to the continuing struggle for freedom for African-Americans. Since President Lincoln had signed the 13th Amendment on the first day of February, that date was chosen to celebrate National Freedom Day. The first commemoration took place on February 1, 1942, at Independence Hall. As it has every year since, the remembrance included laying a wreath at the Liberty Bell.

    On June 30, 1948, President Harry Truman, a Democrat, signed a bill proclaiming February 1 as National Freedom Day. It is not a federal holiday; government offices and banks are open for business.

    For the entire article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Freedom_Day

  4. Greensboro Sit-Ins – 56th Anniversary

    The Greensboro sit-ins were a series of nonviolent protests in 1960 which led to the Woolworth department store chain reversing its policy of racial segregation in the Southern United States.

    While not the first sit-ins of the African-American Civil Rights Movement, the Greensboro sit-ins were an instrumental action, leading to increased national sentiment at a crucial period in US history. The primary event took place at the Greensboro, North Carolina Woolworth store, now the International Civil Rights Center and Museum.

    In August 1939, African-American attorney Samuel Wilbert Tucker organized a sit-in at the then-segregated Alexandria, Virginia library. In 1942, the Congress of Racial Equality sponsored sit-ins in Chicago, as they did in St. Louis in 1949 and Baltimore in 1952. A 1958 sit-in in Wichita, Kansas also was successful.

    On February 1, 1960,at 4:30 pm four students from the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University sat down at the lunch counter inside the Woolworth store at 132 South Elm Street in Greensboro, North Carolina.The men, later known as the A&T Four or the Greensboro Four, went to Woolworth’s Store, bought toothpaste and other products from a desegregated counter at the store with no problems, and then were refused service from the segregated lunch counter, at the same store. Following store policy, the lunch counter staff refused to serve the African American men at the “whites only” counter and the store’s manager asked them to leave.

    The four university freshmen – Joseph McNeil, Franklin McCain, Ezell Blair, Jr. (later known as Jibreel Khazan), and David Richmond – stayed until the store closed.

    The next day, more than twenty African American students who had been recruited from other campus groups came to the store to join the sit-in. Students from Bennett College, a college for African American women in Greensboro, joined the protest. White customers heckled the black students, who read books and studied to keep busy. The lunch counter staff continued to refuse service.

    Newspaper reporters and a TV videographer covered the second day of peaceful demonstrations and others in the community learned of the protests. On the third day, more than 60 people came to the Woolworth store. A statement issued by Woolworth national headquarters said the company would “abide by local custom” and maintain its segregated policy.

    More than 300 people took part on the fourth day. Organizers agreed to spread the sit-in protests to include the lunch counter at Greensboro’s Kress store.

    As early as one week after the Greensboro sit-in had begun, students in other North Carolina towns launched their own sit-ins. Demonstrations spread to towns near Greensboro, including Winston-Salem, Durham, Raleigh, and Charlotte. Out-of-state towns like Lexington, Kentucky also saw protests.

    For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greensboro_sit-ins

  5. WH

    Tuesday, February 2, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    11:15 AM
    President Obama meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan
    Oval Office

    12:00 PM
    12:30 PM
    President Obama has lunch with House Speaker Paul Ryan
    Private Dining Room

    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    First Lady joins Lena Dunham, Julianne Moore and moderator, Editor-in-Chief of MORE Magazine Lesley Jane Seymour, for a panel entitled “Media with Purpose” at the American Magazine Media Conference
    Grand Hyatt, New York, New York

    3:00 PM
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  6. January 28, 2016

    First Lady Michelle Obama to Discuss Let Girls Learn at American Magazine Media Conference

    Mrs. Obama will be joined by actresses Lena Dunham and Julianne Moore

    Tuesday, February 2nd

    New York, New York * 2:00PM ET – As part of the Let Girls Learn initiative, the First Lady will join Lena Dunham, Julianne Moore and moderator, Editor-in-Chief of MORE Magazine Lesley Jane Seymour, for a panel entitled “Media with Purpose” at the American Magazine Media Conference at the Grand Hyatt. The panel discussion will address the power of the media industry to raise awareness for critical issues such as adolescent girls’ education around the world.

    As part of this event, the magazine media industry leadership is coming together to raise awareness about the Let Girls Learn initiative, which is committed to expanding access to education for adolescent girls worldwide and helping the more than 62 million adolescent girls who are not in school today. The First Lady guest-edited the July/August 2015 issue of MORE Magazine.

    The American Magazine Media Conference is hosted by the Association of Magazine Media (MPA). MPA represents 200 domestic, associate, and international members, and the organization serves as the primary advocate and voice for the magazine media industry. For more information, visit http://www.magazine.org/ammc2016

  7. The Democratic Candidates Virtually Tied Last Night. Here’s What Happens Next.

    FEB 2, 2016 9:02 AM BY TARA CULP-RESSLER – thinkprogress

    Sen. Bernie Sanders and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton essentially tied in the Iowa caucus on Monday night, in a tight race that both camps say will help jump start their bids for the Democratic nomination. Here’s what happened last night, and what happens next:

    This was the closest Democratic Iowa caucus in history.

    As of early Tuesday morning, with all but one precinct reporting, Clinton had a razor-thin margin over Sanders — 49.86 percent to 49.57 percent. According to the chairman of the Iowa Democratic Party, the results are the closest in Iowa Democratic caucus history.

    The race was so close that several Democratic precincts actually flipped coins to determine the winner — a rare but legal caucus procedure used to break ties. According to the Des Moines Register, Hillary Clinton won the coin flips at all three precincts that relied on this maneuver.

    Both candidates are claiming victory.

    Clinton and Sanders both say that Iowa’s results are good news for them.

    With a mere 0.3 edge over Sanders, Clinton’s camp claimed victory early Tuesday morning. “Hillary Clinton has won the Iowa Caucus,” her Iowa state director said in a statement. “There is no uncertainty and Secretary Clinton has clearly won the most national and state delegates.”

    The Sanders campaign, meanwhile, isn’t conceding defeat, saying the tight race should prove to the American people that the Vermont senator can win this election. “I think the people of Iowa have sent a very profound message,” Sanders told a crowd of his supporters. “It’s just too late for establishment politics and establishment economics.”

    Sanders and Clinton will split Iowa’s delegates.

    Iowa’s 44 Democratic national convention delegates will be distributed almost evenly among the two candidates. Early Tuesday morning, the Associated Press reported that Clinton had captured at least 22 delegates and Sanders had secured 21.

    By early Tuesday, multiple outlets reported that there’s one precinct outstanding that’s worth 2.28 state delegate equivalents. Numbers from the Iowa Democratic Party — which said Clinton had so far been awarded 699.57 state delegate equivalents and Sanders had received 695.49 state delegate equivalents — suggests that precinct is not enough for Sanders to close the narrow gap.

    For more; http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2016/02/02/3745162/democratic-tie-iowa/

  8. GOP WRONG WAY

    Ted Cruz Just Won The Iowa Caucus. This Is His Radical Agenda For America.

    FEB 1, 2016 10:42 PM BY AVIVA SHEN & KIRA LERNER – thinkprogress

    Sen. Ted Cruz won the Iowa caucus with about 28 percent of caucusgoers’ votes, edging out Donald Trump by 4 percentage points. His fellow senator, Marco Rubio, received 23 percent.

    Cruz was hammered in Iowa for his stance against ethanol subsidies, a major boon to the corn-heavy state, but also netted endorsements from prominent Iowa conservatives like Bob Vander Plaats, an anti-LGBT activist who heads the Iowan organization The FAMiLY Leader.

    Though Trump has grabbed headlines for his racist and bombastic rhetoric, the senator from Texas holds some of the most extreme policy ideas in the race. Here are some of the key policies Iowa Republicans have endorsed with their ballots tonight:

    * Women’s Health
    Cruz is staunchly anti-abortion and has worked in Texas to make it harder for women to receive abortions.

    * Immigration
    Cruz has never and still does not support a path to citizenship for the country’s 11 million undocumented immigrants.

    * Terrorism
    Cruz has called for “carpet bombing” and “saturation bombing” regions of Iraq and Syria controlled by ISIS — a tactic that would be a war crime under the Geneva Conventions

    * Obamacare
    Cruz, who grabbed headlines with his 21-hour “filibuster” to try to defund Obamacare in 2013, loves to say that he will repeal “every last word of Obamacare.”

    * Climate Change
    Cruz is the worst denier of all the climate change-denying Republican candidates.

    * Gun Control
    Cruz has an A+ rating from the National Rifle Association.

    * LGBT Rights
    Cruz is campaigning on a promise of ignoring or overturning the Supreme Court’s ruling legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide.

    For the entire article: http://thinkprogress.org/politics/2016/02/01/3745131/ted-cruz-iowa-win/

  9. February 02, 2016

    Remarks by the First Lady, Lena Dunham and Julianne Moore in “Media with Purpose” Discussion at American Magazine Media Conference

    Grand Hyatt Hotel
    New York, New York

    For more information on Let Girls Learn, please visit:

    >www.letgirlslearn.gov<

    2:11 P.M. EST

    MS. SEYMOUR: All right, ladies. Okay, let’s rock today. (Laughter.) We're going to have fun.

    MRS. OBAMA: Hi, everyone. (Laughter.)

    MS. SEYMOUR: Thank you guys so much for coming. We're so excited. Everybody here is thrilled to have you. I have to see what I’m saying here.

    So let’s start with you, Mrs. Obama. As a guest editor of More Magazine last year, the magazine focused a lot on your latest initiative: Let Girls Learn.

    And we did an event for Let Girls Learn in D.C., as well. Why did you choose a magazine — since these are all magazine executives out here — as your vehicle? And why, in particular, for this initiative?

    MRS. OBAMA: Well, magazines are still the best vehicle to tell a detailed long story, to really go in-depth and paint a picture. And when we launched Let Girls Learn, it was important for us to make sure that people understood the issue and that we could engage readers to take action. So what better partner than More Magazine. We were just so thrilled that you were willing to invest the time and the space and the energy to tell that story.

    And not just to put it in your magazine, but, Leslie, you traveled with me to Cambodia. That's dedication.

    For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/02/02/remarks-first-lady-lena-dunham-and-julianne-moore-media-purpose

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