PBO & FLOTUS Michelle @ SXSW

 

President Barack Obama, Michelle Obama to Speak at SXSW

MAR 2 2016, 4:44 PM ET by 
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South by Southwest has announced that President Barack Obama will appear as part of a keynote conversation at SXSW Interactive on March 11.

First Lady Michelle Obama will be the opening keynote at SXSW Music on March 16.

SXSW said Wednesday that it’s the first time in its 30-year history that a sitting president and the first lady have participated in the event.

SXSW said President Obama will sit down with editor-in-chief of the Texas Tribune Evan Smith for a conversation about civic engagement in the 21st century and call on the audience to apply their ideas and talents to make technology work in areas such as increasing participation in the political process and fighting climate change.

First Lady Michelle Obama will discuss the Let Girls Learn initiative, which aims to break barriers for the 62 million girls around the world who are not in school today.

“I can’t imagine a better way to celebrate our event’s 30th year than to welcome both the president and first lady to SXSW,” said SXSW co-founder Roland Swenson. “As each new generation comes up at SXSW, they look for ways they can be of service, and it’s important to reflect and support that message. President and Mrs. Obama’s visit here will inspire attendees to that purpose.”

For more: http://www.nbcnews.com/business/business-news/president-barack-obama-michelle-obama-speak-sxsw-n530581

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March 11, 2016
President Obama delivers remarks as part of a keynote conversation at SXSW Interactive
South by Southwest, Austin, TX

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March 16, 2016
First Lady Michelle Obama delivers the opening keynote address at SXSW Music
South by Southwest, Austin, TX

 

#SXSW

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9 thoughts on “PBO & FLOTUS Michelle @ SXSW

  1. WH

    Friday, March 11, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    First lady Michelle Obama departs the White House en route for California

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    10:35 AM
    President Obama departs the White House en route Joint Base Andrews
    South Lawn

    10:50 AM
    President Obama departs Joint Base Andrews

    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    First lady Michelle Obama attends the funeral of Nancy Reagan
    Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Simi Valley, CA

    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    2:10 PM
    President Obama arrives Austin, TX
    Austin Bergstrom International Airport

    3:00 PM
    3:40 PM
    President Obama participates in Civic Engagement in the 21st Century
    Long Center for Performing Arts, SXSW, Austin, TX

    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    5:40 PM
    President Obama delivers remarks at a DNC event
    Austin Music Hall, Austin, TX

    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    7:20 PM
    President Obama delivers remarks and takes questions at a DNC event
    Private Residence, Austin, TX

    8:00 PM
    8:45 PM
    President Obama departs Austin en route to Dallas, TX
    Austin Bergstrom International Airport

    9:00 PM

    9:35 PM
    President Obama arrives Dallas, TX
    Dartfort Fueling-Dallas Love Airport

    10:00 PM

    President Obama overnights in Dallas, TX

  2. Obama, first lady to headline SXSW festival

    3/02/16 11:29 AM EST By Mario Trujillo – TheHill

    President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama will headline the South by Southwest (SXSW) festival later this month to promote participation in politics and girls’ education.

    The annual gathering in Austin, Texas, blends together music, film and emerging technology. It has been a key stop for technology-minded lawmakers over the years but has never hosted a sitting president.

    Obama will headline the interactive — or tech-focused — portion of the event next Friday, when he will encourage entrepreneurs and inventors to develop tools to increase political participation and reduce climate change.

    First Lady Michelle Obama will discuss the Let Girls Learn initiative, which aims to break barriers for the 62 million girls around the world who are not in school today.

    “I can’t imagine a better way to celebrate our event’s 30th year than to welcome both the president and first lady to SXSW,” said SXSW co-founder Roland Swenson. “As each new generation comes up at SXSW, they look for ways they can be of service, and it’s important to reflect and support that message. President and Mrs. Obama’s visit here will inspire attendees to that purpose.”

    For more: http://www.nbcnews.com/business/business-news/president-barack-obama-michelle-obama-speak-sxsw-n530581

    • March 11, 2016

      Remarks by the President at South By Southwest Interactive

      Long Center for Performing Arts
      Austin, Texas

      3:03 P.M. CST

      THE PRESIDENT: Hey! (Applause.) It’s good to see you, and hello, Austin! (Applause.) I love Austin, Texas. (Applause.)

      AUDIENCE MEMBER: We love you!

      THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. It’s good to be back.

      Q Nice to have you here. Welcome. Welcome to Austin. Welcome to South by Southwest. Let’s make a little news. You stopped at Torchy’s on the way in from the airport. (Applause.)

      THE PRESIDENT: I did.

      Q You did. Would you please share with the world what you told me backstage — your order? Perfectly in keeping with your political views.

      THE PRESIDENT: I ordered the Democrat. (Applause.) But then I ordered a Republican and an Independent, because I wanted to give all people a proper hearing. I wanted to be fair.

      Q Bipartisan in tacos as in life.

      THE PRESIDENT: That’s exactly right.

      Q That’s how it goes. Mr. President, you’re very nice to be here with us today. And you came for a purpose. You want to accomplish something. You said as much in your weekly radio address last weekend. I got the opportunity to hear it. Some people in the room have not heard it. For their benefit, and people outside the room, would you say why you’re here? Make the pitch in miniature, please.

      THE PRESIDENT: Well, first of all, I’m here because I like excuses to come to Austin, Texas. (Applause.) And that’s a good enough reason. And I want to acknowledge your Mayor, Steve Adler, who bought tacos with me. (Applause.)

      I normally don’t do this, but I’m going to embarrass somebody — I’m going to also acknowledge the Chancellor of the Texas System because he’s one of my favorite people and a truly great American — Bill McRaven, who I think is over there. (Applause.) It’s pretty rare where a chancellor of a university system can really mess you up. (Laughter.) So, in case any of the students are wondering, don’t mess with your chancellor. (Laughter.) But I knew him as Admiral, and he served America as well as anybody served it.

      Look, we are at a moment in history where technology, globalization, our economy is changing so fast. And this gathering, South by Southwest, brings together people who are at the cutting-edge of those changes. Those changes offer us enormous opportunities but also are very disruptive and unsettling. They empower individuals to do things that they could have never dreamed of before, but they also empower folks who are very dangerous to spread dangerous messages.

      And part of my challenge since I’ve been President is trying to find ways in which our government can be a part of the positive change that’s taking place and can help convene and catalyze folks in the private sector and the non-profit sector to be part of the broader civic community in tackling some of our biggest challenges.

      For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/03/14/remarks-president-south-southwest-interactive

    • March 16, 2016

      Remarks by the First Lady in a Keynote Discussion at South by Southwest

      REMARKS BY THE FIRST LADY
      IN A KEYNOTE DISCUSSION
      AT SOUTH BY SOUTHWEST
      FEATURING MISSY ELLIOTT, QUEEN LATIFAH,
      SOPHIA BUSH, AND DIANE WARREN

      Austin Convention Center
      Austin, Texas

      11:20 A.M. CDT

      MS. LATIFAH: Wow. This is amazing. Well, to kick things off today, the first question is one that a lot of folks here in the audience are asking, so I’m going to throw it out to each one of you on the panel: What is the pivotal moment in your life that inspired your passion in you, either about a cause, an issue, whatever might have been on your mind? Anyone can take it. I mean, I can set it off if you need me to.

      MS. ELLIOTT: You take it. Cleo, set it off. (Laughter.)

      MS. LATIFAH: Secret Service, I don’t need it like that. (Laughter.) Not like that. It was a movie. I can tell you from me — and I’ll just start off just to let everybody relax for a second.

      For me, one of the most pivotal times in my life that I can remember something hitting me in such a strong way is in the ‘80s, when I was a teenager growing up in New Jersey, running around New York, hanging out, loving hip hop and music, and a high school — crack was one of the biggest things that impacted my community, all of our communities, really. Crack and AIDS were two of the things that hit our communities so powerfully.

      And maybe this wasn’t something that seemed to affect a lot of other people because the media only seemed to show it — when you saw crack, you saw it connected to black people, primarily, in the inner cities. It was everywhere. AIDS was everywhere, and moving really fast. And I think the reason it affected me so deeply was because I saw friends who were just teenagers, kids experimenting with things, as we all do as teenagers. And you try that thing once, and someone who was just on the basketball team with me is now, like, just hooked on drugs and has no way out. That really broke my heart, and I saw it happen to a lot of my friends.

      So it inspired me and a lot of my fellow students, as well as my mom, who was a teacher at my high school, to create an organization called Students Against Crack. This was our way of becoming involved in the issue and trying to put the word out there that we could — don’t even do it, crack is whack. All of those phrases that you heard — like, this is not cool. And it took us, kids who thought we were cool, to try to tell other kids that this is not cool, this is not what you want to do, and it will ruin your life.

      Also, AIDS affected me closely because one of my — two of — one of my cousins had AIDS through intravenous drug use; the other one through a blood transfusion at the time, because there wasn’t a lot of protection on it at that time. And here it is — two my big cousins, two of my favorite cousins who I loved so much, went from really virile, strong people to being withered away by this disease. And there was such a stigma around it and such fear created around it, but these are people I love, so I’m going to hug my cousin, and here you are making people afraid to even touch them, don’t even come in the hospital, don’t come — so I knew that there was a lot of things that were being told and purported that weren’t really real.

      And my only way to effect it was to try to make a record about it, or try to be involved in the things — the AIDS dance-a-thons, and whatever we could do to raise money for research and getting the word out there that — to get more information to people. Because it was a scary time in both of those things.

      So that was something that kind of spurred me into action. It was the little action I could take as a teenager, but it was something that meant a lot to me.

      So, I mean, you don’t have to go that deep with all of it, I’m just saying. (Laughter.) What was one of those things that affected you?

      MRS. OBAMA: It is deep. Because there are a lot of young people here, and I think probably the common thread for us is that it was something that affected us deeply, something we felt passionately about.

      For me, when I was younger, it was always the doubters. And I don’t know about young people here, but growing up as a black girl on the South Side of Chicago, where the expectations of me were limited, as I was trying to make my way and do good in school and apply to good colleges, there were always people around telling me what I couldn’t do, always telling me how far I should only dream. And my reaction to that at that time was to prove the doubters wrong. That spurred me — “I’ll show you.” They give you strength. (Applause.)

      But not every young person reacts to that that way. And there are many young people whose dreams get snuffed out with that kind of negative energy. And that brings me to today, now that I’m First Lady, one of the things —

      MS. LATIFAH: Yes, you are. (Applause.)

      MRS. OBAMA: But I still see the effects of that doubting on so many young people, particularly young girls. And as I’ve traveled around the country, I’ve heard some horrifying stories of young women being pushed down because they’re trying to get an education — young girls like Malala Yousafzai, who was shot in the head by terrorists because she was speaking out about the importance of girls getting an education.

      For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/03/16/remarks-first-lady-keynote-discussion-south-southwest

  3. First lady Michelle Obama attends the funeral of Nancy Reagan
    Ronald Reagan Presidential Library, Simi Valley, CA

  4. 7:20 PM ET
    President Obama delivers remarks and takes questions at a DNC event
    Private Residence, Austin, Texas

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