Pres Obama Travels to Vietnam & G7 Japan 2016

Japan Vietnam mapMay 10, 2016

Statement by the Press Secretary on the President’s Travel to Vietnam and Japan

The President will travel to Vietnam and Japan May 21-28, on what will be his tenth trip to Asia. This trip will highlight the President’s ongoing commitment to the U.S. Rebalance to Asia and the Pacific, designed to increase U.S. diplomatic, economic, and security engagement with the countries and peoples of the region.

The President will first visit Vietnam, where he will hold official meetings with Vietnam’s leadership to discuss ways for the U.S.-Vietnam Comprehensive Partnership to advance cooperation across a wide range of areas, including economic, people-to-people, security, human rights, and global and regional issues. In Hanoi, the President will deliver a speech on U.S.-Vietnam relations. During meetings and events in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, the President will discuss the importance of approving the Trans-Pacific Partnership this year. The President also will meet with members of civil society, the Young Southeast Asian Leadership Initiative, entrepreneurs, and the business community.

In Japan, the President will participate in his final G-7 Summit in Ise-Shima. This gathering will enable the G-7 leaders to advance common interests across the full range of economic and security priorities and to address pressing global challenges. The President and Prime Minister Abe will meet bilaterally to further advance the U.S.-Japan alliance, including our cooperation on economic and security issues as well as a host of global challenges. Finally, the President will make an historic visit to Hiroshima with Prime Minister Abe to highlight his continued commitment to pursuing the peace and security of a world without nuclear weapons.

G7 2016 Japan

The Group of 7 (G7) is a group consisting of the finance ministers and central bank governors of seven major advanced economies as reported by the International Monetary FundCanadaFranceGermanyItalyJapan, the United Kingdom, and the United States meeting to discuss primarily economic issues. The European Union is also represented within the G7. The G7 are the seven wealthiest major developed nations by national net wealth, representing more than 64% of the net global wealth ($263 trillion) according to the Credit Suisse Global Wealth Report October 2014. The IMF’s Managing Director usually participates. Recent G7 meetings include that of May 2013 in Aylesbury, United Kingdom with an emergency meeting in The Hague, Netherlands on March 24, 2014. Most recently, there was a meeting in Brussels on June 4, 2014.

The G7’s precursor was the ‘Group of Six’, founded ad hoc in 1975, consisting of finance ministers and central bank governors from FranceWest GermanyItalyJapan, the United Kingdom and the United States, when Giscard d’Estaing invited them for an “informal gathering at the chateau of Rambouillet, near Paris […] in a relaxed and private setting”.  The intent was “to discuss current world issues (dominated at the time by the oil crisis) in a frank and informal manner”.  Canada became the seventh member in 1976, after which the name ‘Group 7’ or G7 was used.  During 1986–87 the G7 with its finance ministers and central bank governors superseded the G5 as the main policy coordination group, particularly following the Louvre Accord of February 1987, agreed by the G5 plus Canada and endorsed by the G7.

For more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G7

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G7 Summit 2016

Shima, Mie Prefecture,  Japan

On May 26 and 27, Japan will convene the G7 Ise-Shima Summit in Mie Prefecture.

In Ise-Shima, the stage for the G7 Summit, you can find not only Ise Jingu Shrine with a history dating back to time immemorial, but also marvelous natural beauty including the rich sea spreading out before your eyes, islands large and small, and countless inlets. It is a perfect example of our heartland – a place dear to many, away from the bustling cities.

Today, the international community faces numerous challenges. A slowdown in the growth of the global economy, terrorism threatening people’s lives, a surge of refugees, and unilateral changes to the status quo through the use of coercion are all among the challenges affecting the peace and prosperity we enjoy in our daily lives.

The G7 members, which share fundamental values such as freedom, democracy, the rule of law, and human rights, must take a global perspective to provide the most appropriate roadmap for solving these challenges with a clear vision.

The heads of state and government of the Group of Seven (G7) will be meeting at

Key issues they will be addressing include:

President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Vietnamese President Tran Pai Quang
Presidential Palace, Hanoi, Vietnam

President Obama attends a State Luncheon hosted by Vietnamese President Tran Pai Quang
Presidential Palace, Hanoi, Vietnam

President Obama and Vietnamese President Tran Pai Quang hold a joint press conference
Presidential Palace, Hanoi, Vietnam

President Obama meets with Vietnamese National Assembly Chairwoman Nguyen Thi Kim Nguan
International Convention Center, Hanoi, Vietnam

President Obama attends a state luncheon
International Convention Center, Hanoi, Vietnam

President Obama meets with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc
Presidential Palace, Hanoi, Vietnam

President Obama meets with U.S. Embassy Staff
JW Marriott, Hanoi, Vietnam

President Obama meets with civil society and business members
JW Marriott, Hanoi, Vietnam

President Obama delivers remarks
National Convention Center, Hanoi, Vietnam

President Obama travels to Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Noibai International Airport, Hanoi, Vietnam

President Obama arrives Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Tan Son Nhat Airport, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

President Obama tours the Jade Pagoda
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

President Obama tours DreamPlex
DreamPlex Coworking Space, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

President Obama participates in a Business and Entrepreneurship Event
DreamPlex Coworking Space, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

President Obama delivers remarks to the Vietnamese people
DreamPlex Coworking Space, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

President Obama meets with U.S. Consulate Staff and family members
InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

President Obama participates in a town hall with Vietnamese youth
GEM Center, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

President Obama departs Vietnam en route for Japan
InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

President Obama arrives Japan
Chubu Centrair International Airport,  Tokoname, Aichi, Japan

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Japan

President Obama tours the Ise-Jingu Shrine
Ise, Mie, Japan

President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe
Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture,  Japan

President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe hold a joint press conference
Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture,  Japan

President Obama attends a G7 welcome ceremony
Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture,  Japan

President Obama joins other leaders in G7 session
Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture,  Japan

President Obama joins other leaders in G7 working lunch
Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture,  Japan

President Obama joins other leaders in G7 family photo
Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture,  Japan

President Obama and other world leaders hold a bilateral meetings
Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture,  Japan

President Obama holds a press conference
Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture,  Japan

President Obama joins other leaders in G7 working dinner
Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture,  Japan

President Obama joins other leaders in attending a cultural performance for the leaders
Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture,  Japan

President Obama departs Shima, Mie Prefecture for Hiroshima
Chubu Centrair International Airport,  Tokoname, Aichi, Japan

President Obama arrives Hiroshima, Japan
Marine Corps Air Station Iwakune, Hiroshima, Japan

President Obama tours the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima, Japan

President Obama deliver remarks Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima, Japan

President Obama participates in a wreath laying ceremony
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima, Japan

President Obama meets Hiroshima bomb survivors
Hiroshima Peace Memorial, Hiroshima, Japan

President Obama folded, presented paper cranes
Hiroshima Peace Memorial, Hiroshima, Japan

President Obama meets with U.S. Service members
Marine Corps Air Station Iwakune, Hiroshima, Japan

President Obama departs Japan enroute for Washington DC
Marine Corps Air Station Iwakune, Hiroshima, Japan

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G7 2016
May 23–27, 2016
Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

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#G7

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32 thoughts on “Pres Obama Travels to Vietnam & G7 Japan 2016

  1. I am so glad that he went and I pray strongly for his safety in Jesus Name and protection. Amen!

  2. WH

    Monday, May 23, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

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    President Obama meets with U.S. Embassy Staff
    JW Marriott, Hanoi, Vietnam

    11:40 PM
    President Obama meets with civil society and business members
    JW Marriott, Hanoi, Vietnam

  3. POTUS podium

    May 23, 2016

    WhiteHouse.gov http://www.whitehouse.gov/live

    12:55 AM EDT
    President Obama Delivers Remarks at the National Convention Center
    Hanoi, Vietnam

    6:45 AM EDT
    President Obama Delivers Remarks on Entrepreneurship and Opportunity for the Vietnamese People
    Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    8:00 AM EDT
    Press Briefing by Principal Deputy Press Secretary Eric Schultz
    Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    3:15 PM EDT
    White House Convening on Gun Violence Prevention for State and Local Officials
    The White House

    —-

    CSPAN http://www.cspan.org/

    1:49 PM EDT
    State Department Briefing
    State Department Daily Briefing Mark Toner briefed reporters and responded to their questions on a variety of international topics. http://www.c-span.org/video/?410061-1/state-department-briefing

    2:59 PM EDT
    U.S. Senate Debates Sex Offender Registration Programs
    Senate Session The Senate was to begin debate on S.2613, the Adam Walsh Reauthorization Act. The bill authorizes $162 million over two years for sex offender registration programs under the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act.http://www.c-span.org/video/?410025-1/us-senate-debates-sex-offender-registration-programs

    • President Obama’s Asia Itinerary

      May 22, 2016
      ———–

      President Obama arrives Hanoi
      Hanoi, Vietnam

      President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Vietnamese President Tran Pai Quang
      Presidential Palace, Hanoi, Vietnam

      President Obama attends a State Luncheon hosted by Vietnamese President Tran Pai Quang
      Presidential Palace, Hanoi, Vietnam

      President Obama and Vietnamese President Tran Pai Quang hold a joint press conference
      Presidential Palace, Hanoi, Vietnam

      President Obama meets with Vietnamese National Assembly Chairwoman Nguyen Thi Kim Nguan
      International Convention Center, Hanoi, Vietnam

      President Obama attends a state luncheon
      International Convention Center, Hanoi, Vietnam

      President Obama meets with Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc
      Presidential Palace, Hanoi, Vietnam

      • May 23, 2016

        Remarks by President Obama and President Quang of Vietnam in Joint Press Conference

        Presidential Palace
        Hanoi, Vietnam

        12:59 P.M. ICT

        PRESIDENT QUANG: (As interpreted.) Your Excellency, President of the United States of America, Mr. Barack Obama, ladies and gentlemen, on behalf of the leaders of the party state and the people of Vietnam, once again I’d like to warmly welcome President Barack Obama and the high-level delegation of the U.S. government on your official visit to Vietnam.

        Mr. President and I had a very productive talk on bilateral relations, regional and global issues of common interest. We discussed the implementation of the joint statement on Vietnam-U.S. Comprehensive Partnership signed in July 2013, and the Joint Vision Statement between the two countries in July of 2015 concluded between the high-level leaders of the two countries. We agreed that important progress in bilateral relations have been made in recent years. Both sides committed to implementing the principles of respect for each other’s independence, sovereignty, territorial integrity, and political regime.

        During President Obama’s official visit, Vietnam and the U.S. agreed to a joint statement on strengthening the comprehensive partnership with added substance, depth, and effectiveness. Both sides agreed to place development cooperation at the center of the bilateral ties.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/05/23/remarks-president-obama-and-president-quang-vietnam-joint-press

    • President Obama’s Asia Itinerary

      May 23, 2016
      ———–

      President Obama meets with U.S. Embassy Staff
      JW Marriott, Hanoi, Vietnam

      President Obama meets with civil society and business members
      JW Marriott, Hanoi, Vietnam

      President Obama delivers remarks
      National Convention Center, Hanoi, Vietnam

      President Obama travels to Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
      Noibai International Airport, Hanoi, Vietnam

      President Obama arrives Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
      Tan Son Nhat Airport, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

      President Obama overnights in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

      • May 24, 2016

        Remarks by President Obama After Meeting with Vietnamese Civil Society Leaders

        JW Marriott Hotel Hanoi
        Hanoi, Vietnam

        11:45 A.M. ICT

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: I just had a wonderful conversation with some preeminent civil society activists here in Vietnam. And I just want to thank them for taking the time to meet with me and discussing with me some of the important work that they’re doing, and the progress that’s being made here in Vietnam.

        We have a wide range of activists here. We have pastors whose congregations are doing important work helping individuals fight addiction and encouraging the faithful around the values of their faith. We have advocates on behalf of the disabled who are doing important work to make sure that they have full access to jobs and opportunity here in Vietnam. We have LGBT activists who are making sure that the marginalized in society have a voice. We have advocates on behalf of freedom of speech and press and the Internet, who are doing important training throughout the country. We have a very popular artist here who is speaking out on behalf of freedom of speech and expression and artists throughout Vietnam.

        And so what I’ve heard consistently from all of them is a recognition that Vietnam has made remarkable strides in many ways — the economy is growing quickly, the Internet is booming, and there’s a growing confidence here — but that, as I indicated yesterday, there are still areas of significant concern in terms of freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, accountability with respect to government.

        I emphasized in my meetings yesterday with the President, the Prime Minister, the General Secretary, the Chairwoman of the National Assembly that we respect the sovereignty and independence of Vietnam. Ultimately, it’s up to the Vietnamese people to determine how their society functions and the nature of the government.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/05/24/remarks-president-obama-after-meeting-vietnamese-civil-society-leaders

    • President Obama’s Asia Itinerary

      May 24, 2016
      ———–

      President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

      President Obama tours the Jade Pagoda
      Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

      President Obama tours DreamPlex
      DreamPlex Coworking Space, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

      President Obama participates in a Business and Entrepreneurship Event
      DreamPlex Coworking Space, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

      President Obama delivers remarks to the Vietnamese people
      DreamPlex Coworking Space, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

      President Obama meets with U.S. Consulate Staff and family members
      InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

      • May 24, 2016

        Remarks by the President in Discussion at Business and Entrepreneurship Event

        DreamPlex
        Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

        5:20 P.M. ICT

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: Thank you. Zin chào. (Applause.) Thank you very much. Thank you. Well, it’s wonderful to be here in Ho Chi Minh City. Please have a seat.

        I just had the opportunity to visit the Jade Emperor Pagoda. And I think going from a 100-year-old sacred temple to this 21st century Dreamplex is I think a wonderful expression of the evolution that’s taken place here in Vietnam — a country that honors its history, but is also boldly racing towards the future.

        And that’s also the story of this city. This is a city on the move. And we could see as we were traveling in from the airport all the activity that’s currently taking place. And I’m not just talking about the traffic — (laughter) — although I do think it might be easier to be on a motorbike than a motorcade. (Laughter.)

        But this city, like this country, is full of energy. You can see it in the skyscrapers shooting above the horizon and the shops that are springing up at every corner. You can spot it online, where tens of millions of Vietnamese are connecting with each other and with the world. And you can feel it here at DreamPlex, where ideas are becoming a reality. I just had the chance to see some of those ideas in action — young people who are making things happen. I saw a virtual game that can help people recover from nerve injuries, to a machine that lets your smartphone control a laser-cutter — although you have to be careful with the laser-cutter where you point it. (Laughter.)

        But some of this energy may be due to your famous cà phê trúng. That stuff is strong, I understand. But the real driver of Vietnam’s growth, and the engine of Ho Chi Minh City, is the spirit of entrepreneurship — the spirit that brings us here today.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/05/24/remarks-president-discussion-business-and-entrepreneurship-event

      • May 24, 2016

        Remarks by President Obama in Address to the People of Vietnam

        National Convention Center
        Hanoi, Vietnam

        12:11 P.M. ICT

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: Xin chào! (Applause.) Xin chào Vietnam! (Applause.) Thank you. Thank you so much. To the government and the people of Vietnam, thank you for this very warm welcome and the hospitality that you have shown to me on this visit. And thank all of you for being here today. (Applause.) We have Vietnamese from across this great country, including so many young people who represent the dynamism, and the talent and the hope of Vietnam.

        On this visit, my heart has been touched by the kindness for which the Vietnamese people are known. In the many people who have been lining the streets, smiling and waving, I feel the friendship between our peoples. Last night, I visited the Old Quarter here in Hanoi and enjoyed some outstanding Vietnamese food. I tried some Bún Chả. (Applause.) Drank some bia Ha Noi. But I have to say, the busy streets of this city, I’ve never seen so many motorbikes in my life. (Laughter.) So I haven’t had to try to cross the street so far, but maybe when I come back and visit you can tell me how.

        I am not the first American President to come to Vietnam in recent times. But I am the first, like so many of you, who came of age after the war between our countries. When the last U.S. forces left Vietnam, I was just 13 years old. So my first exposure to Vietnam and the Vietnamese people came when I was growing up in Hawaii, with its proud Vietnamese American community there.

        At the same time, many people in this country are much younger than me. Like my two daughters, many of you have lived your whole lives knowing only one thing — and that is peace and normalized relations between Vietnam and the United States. So I come here mindful of the past, mindful of our difficult history, but focused on the future — the prosperity, security and human dignity that we can advance together.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/05/24/remarks-president-obama-address-people-vietnam


    • President Obama’s Asia Itinerary

      May 25, 2016
      ———–

      President Obama participates in a town hall with Vietnamese youth
      GEM Center, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

      President Obama departs Vietnam en route for Japan
      InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

      President Obama arrives Japan
      Chubu Centrair International Airport, Tokoname, Aichi, Japan

      President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe
      Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

      President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe hold a joint press conference
      Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

      • May 25, 2016

        Remarks by President Obama at YSEALI Town Hall

        GEM Convention Center
        Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

        11:07 A.M. ICT

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: Thank you! (Applause.) Thank you so much. Everybody, please have a seat. Thank you very much. Xin chào. (Applause.) Thank you, Tu, for the excellent introduction and your outstanding work to help more young people in Vietnam get an education. Give Tu a big round of applause. (Applause.) It’s not that easy introducing the President of the United States. (Laughter.) Also because the podium was a little higher than her. (Laughter.)

        I want to thank everybody at the GEM Convention Center for hosting us. I want to thank the government and the people of Vietnam for the wonderful hospitality that you’ve extended to me over the past three days. I’ve been deeply touched.

        Wherever I travel around the world, obviously one of my jobs is to meet with government leaders. And these meetings are important. But it means that I spend a lot of time with older people like me. There’s a lot of gray hair in the room. So one of my favorite parts of the trips I take overseas is to get out of the government offices and to spend time with young people like you. It’s fun. It gives me incredible optimism about the future, because all of you embody the energy and the drive that is helping to propel this region to new heights. You make me hopeful about the future of ASEAN, hopeful about the future of the world.

        And so that’s what I want to briefly talk about before I start taking your questions.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/05/25/remarks-president-obama-yseali-town-hall

      • May 25, 2016

        Remarks by President Obama and Prime Minister Abe after Bilateral Meeting

        Shima Kanko Hotel
        Ise-Shima, Japan

        10:42 P.M. JST

        PRIME MINISTER ABE: (As interpreted.) At the very outset of our small group discussion, I firmly lodged a protest against President Obama as the Japanese Prime Minister with regard to the most recent case in Okinawa. The entire time for the small group discussion was spent on this specific case in Okinawa. And I feel profound resentment against this self-centered and absolutely despicable crime.

        This case has shocked not only Okinawa, but also deeply shocked the entire Japan. I conveyed to the President that such feelings of Japanese people should be sincerely taken to heart. I also urged the United States to make sure to take effective and thorough means to prevent a recurrence, and vigorously and strictly address the situation.

        In proceeding with the realignment of the U.S. forces without truly staying together with the feelings of the people in Okinawa we will not be able to make progress. And there is a tough and challenging road ahead of us as we seek to regain confidence, which was lost due to the most recent case. However, we both agreed to do our utmost in areas such as impact mitigation in Okinawa through Japan-U.S. cooperation.

        At the plenary meeting, for myself, I conveyed to the President that I whole-heartedly welcome the decision by President Obama to visit Hiroshima, a place which suffered an atomic bomb. And he is going to visit Hiroshima as the first-ever U.S. President.

        I am convinced that when the leader of a nation that is the only nation to have used the nuclear weapon and the leader of the nation that is the only nation to have suffered atomic bombings in the war express the feelings of sincere sorrow and pray for the repose of the souls of those citizens who sacrificed their life will create a significant and strong momentum toward the world free of nuclear weapons.

        Japan and the United States, together, working hand in hand, and continuously doing utmost for global peace and prosperity — I would like to send such a powerful message from Hiroshima together with President Obama.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/05/25/remarks-president-obama-and-prime-minister-abe-after-bilateral-meeting

      • May 26, 2016

        Remarks by President Obama in Press Availability — Ise-Shima, Japan

        Shima Kanko Hotel, The Classic
        Ise-Shima, Japan

        6:25 P.M. JST

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: Hello, everybody. So, as all of you know, we’re going to Hiroshima tomorrow. And in the interest of getting you all home at a reasonable hour, we’re not going to be doing a press conference after, so I thought I’d give you guys a chance to fire off some questions now.

        Just a quick comment on the G7 meeting so far. It’s been extremely productive. I think that one of the benefits of the G7 is that you have likeminded countries who are committed to democracy and free markets, and international law and international norms. And so for us to be able to get together and focus on critical issues that not only affect individual countries but affect the international order I think is vitally important. And we very much appreciate the work that the Japanese and Prime Minister Abe have done in organizing an excellent meeting.

        So far, we’ve discussed issues of the global economy and the need to continue to accelerate growth, to use all the tools at our disposal to make sure that we’re not only putting people back to work but also helping to lift wages and helping to make sure that we can sustain the momentum of the recovery that’s taken place in the United States most prominently, but also we’re starting to see some progress in Europe. The fact that the Greek debt crisis has been resolved for a reasonable length of time I think should help. But we’ve all got a lot of work to do. And we agreed to continue to focus on making sure that each country, based on its particular needs and capacities, are taking steps to accelerate growth.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/05/26/remarks-president-obama-press-availability-ise-shima-japan

    • President Obama’s Asia Itinerary

      May 26, 2016
      ———–

      President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

      President Obama attends a G7 welcome ceremony
      Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

      President Obama joins other leaders in G7 session
      Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

      President Obama joins other leaders in G7 working lunch
      Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

      President Obama joins other leaders in G7 family photo
      Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

      President Obama joins other leaders in G7 working dinner
      Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

    • President Obama’s Asia Itinerary

      May 27, 2016
      ———–

      President Obama departs Shima, Mie Prefecture for Hiroshima
      Chubu Centrair International Airport, Tokoname, Aichi, Japan

      President Obama arrives Hiroshima, Japan
      Marine Corps Air Station Iwakune, Hiroshima, Japan

      President Obama tours the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park
      Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima, Japan

      President Obama deliver remarks Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park
      Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima, Japan

      President Obama participates in a wreath laying ceremony
      Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park, Hiroshima, Japan

      President Obama meets with U.S. Service members
      Marine Corps Air Station Iwakune, Hiroshima, Japan

      President Obama departs Japan enroute for Washington DC
      Marine Corps Air Station Iwakune, Hiroshima, Japan

      • May 27, 2016

        Remarks by President Obama and Prime Minister Abe of Japan at Hiroshima Peace Memorial

        Hiroshima Peace Memorial
        Hiroshima, Japan

        5:45 P.M. JST

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: Seventy-one years ago, on a bright, cloudless morning, death fell from the sky and the world was changed. A flash of light and a wall of fire destroyed a city and demonstrated that mankind possessed the means to destroy itself.

        Why do we come to this place, to Hiroshima? We come to ponder a terrible force unleashed in a not so distant past. We come to mourn the dead, including over 100,000 in Japanese men, women and children; thousands of Koreans; a dozen Americans held prisoner. Their souls speak to us. They ask us to look inward, to take stock of who we are and what we might become.

        It is not the fact of war that sets Hiroshima apart. Artifacts tell us that violent conflict appeared with the very first man. Our early ancestors, having learned to make blades from flint and spears from wood, used these tools not just for hunting, but against their own kind. On every continent, the history of civilization is filled with war, whether driven by scarcity of grain or hunger for gold; compelled by nationalist fervor or religious zeal. Empires have risen and fallen. Peoples have been subjugated and liberated. And at each juncture, innocents have suffered, a countless toll, their names forgotten by time.

        The World War that reached its brutal end in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was fought among the wealthiest and most powerful of nations. Their civilizations had given the world great cities and magnificent art. Their thinkers had advanced ideas of justice and harmony and truth. And yet, the war grew out of the same base instinct for domination or conquest that had caused conflicts among the simplest tribes; an old pattern amplified by new capabilities and without new constraints. In the span of a few years, some 60 million people would die — men, women, children no different than us, shot, beaten, marched, bombed, jailed, starved, gassed to death.

        There are many sites around the world that chronicle this war — memorials that tell stories of courage and heroism; graves and empty camps that echo of unspeakable depravity. Yet in the image of a mushroom cloud that rose into these skies, we are most starkly reminded of humanity’s core contradiction; how the very spark that marks us as a species — our thoughts, our imagination, our language, our tool-making, our ability to set ourselves apart from nature and bend it to our will — those very things also give us the capacity for unmatched destruction.

        How often does material advancement or social innovation blind us to this truth. How easily we learn to justify violence in the name of some higher cause. Every great religion promises a pathway to love and peace and righteousness, and yet no religion has been spared from believers who have claimed their faith as a license to kill. Nations arise, telling a story that binds people together in sacrifice and cooperation, allowing for remarkable feats, but those same stories have so often been used to oppress and dehumanize those who are different.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/05/27/remarks-president-obama-and-prime-minister-abe-japan-hiroshima-peace

        • Obama’s origami cranes he left behind touches many hearts

          May 27, 2016 THE ASAHI SHIMBUN

          HIROSHIMA–On his historic visit to ground zero, U.S. President Barack Obama surprised and touched officials at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum on May 27 with origami paper cranes he apparently made himself.

          The museum is preparing to display Obama’s four origami cranes, hoping to embolden efforts to rid the world of nuclear weapons.

          The president said he folded them with help from others as his envoy showed off the origami cranes, made of traditional Japanese paper graced with flower motifs, including apricots or cherries, placed on a tray.

          The unexpected gesture came after Obama showed great interest in the origami cranes folded by schoolgirl Sadako Sasaki, as Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida showed the president around the museum.

          Sadako’s cranes are a symbolic exhibit at the museum illustrating the tragedy of the atomic bombing of this city on Aug. 6, 1945.

          Sadako, the model for the statue of the Children’s Peace Monument at the park, experienced the nuclear blast at the age of 2.

          She was later diagnosed with leukemia when she was in the sixth grade.

          While on her sickbed, she folded more than 1,300 paper cranes out of medicine wrappers and other papers, pinning her hopes on a traditional Japanese saying that a wish will be granted if 1,000 cranes are made.

          Despite her wish to overcome her disease, she died in 1955.

          Her story came to be known as one of the symbols attesting to the horrors of nuclear weapons.

          As the acrylic casing that houses some of Sadako’s cranes was removed for the president, Obama studied them up close and said he brought his own.

          He gave two of his four cranes to two students who were allowed inside the museum to welcome him, the first sitting U.S. president to visit Hiroshima.

          Obama left the other two on the guest book he signed with the message: “We have known the agony of war. Let us now find the courage, together, to spread peace and pursue a world without nuclear weapons.”

          The president later moved to a location in the park where he could view the A-Bomb Dome after laying a wreath of flowers to the monument for the victims and delivering a message. Kishida also referred to the monument modeled on Sadako.

          All of Obama’s four cranes were subsequently donated to the museum.

          For more: http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201605290030.html

      • May 27, 2016

        Remarks by President Obama to U.S. and Japanese Forces

        Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni
        Iwakuni, Japan

        4:02 P.M. JST

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: Hello, everybody! (Applause.) Konnichiwa!

        AUDIENCE: Konnichiwa!

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: Well, it is great to be here. Thank you so much. I got to tell you, during my visit to Japan, we are reaffirming one of the greatest alliances in the world between the United States and Japan. And I wanted to come by and just say thank you — thank you to all the men and women in uniform, thank you to your families, because you guys are the backbone of our alliance. Thank you, everybody. (Applause.)

        I want to thank Colonel Boucher, also known as “Waterboy.” (Laughter.) I want to thank Sergeant Major Garza. I know that we’ve got a lot of folks in the house. We’ve got some NCOs. Staff NCOs. We’ve got some officers. Junior Marines. (Cheers.) Okay. We’ve got some DOD civilians. (Cheers.) And let’s hear it from the family members. (Cheers.)

        I want to thank our Japanese friends for joining us. (Applause.) [Vice] Foreign Minister Kikawada. Mayor Fukuda. Members of the Diet, who are here. Admiral Sonoda and personnel from the Japanese Self-Defense Forces. (Applause.) I also want to thank the wonderful people of Iwakuni City. Your hospitality serving Americans who are far away from home means so much to our nation. On behalf of all of us, arigato.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/05/27/remarks-president-obama-us-and-japanese-forces

    • West Wing Week: 05/29/16 or, “Need a Little Beat?”

      Published on May 31, 2016

      This week, we visit Vietnam with President Obama, where the streets were lined to welcome his first trip to that country. From Vietnam, he traveled to the G7 Summit in Japan, and then made a historic trip to Hiroshima — becoming the first sitting US president to do so. That’s May 21st to May 27th or, “Need a Little Beat?”

  4. WH

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama meets with U.S. Consulate Staff and family members
    InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    President Obama participates in a town hall with Vietnamese youth
    GEM Center, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    President Obama departs Vietnam en route for Japan
    InterContinental Asiana Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    President Obama arrives Japan
    Chubu Centrair International Airport, Tokoname, Aichi, Japan

    President Obama tours the Ise-Jingu Shrine
    Ise, Mie, Japan

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    First Lady Obama Hosts the White House Turnaround Arts Talent Show
    The White House

    President Obama remains overnight in Ise-Shima, Japan

    4:00 PM
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  5. WH

    Wednesday, May 25,, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe
    Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

    President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe hold a joint press conference
    Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

    President Obama attends a G7 welcome ceremony
    Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

    President Obama joins other leaders in G7 session
    Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

    President Obama joins other leaders in G7 working lunch
    Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

    President Obama joins other leaders in G7 family photo
    Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

    President Obama joins other leaders in G7 working dinner
    Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

    President Obama joins other leaders in attending a cultural performance for the leaders
    Shima Kanko Hotel, Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

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  6. May 25, 2016

    Remarks By The First Lady at Turnaround Arts Talent Show

    East Room

    4:03 P.M. EDT

    MRS. OBAMA: Thank you all. Everyone, please rest yourselves. Hello, and welcome to the White House for what is my favorite event of the year! (Applause.) Oh, I am thrilled that all of you could be here for our second White House Turnaround Arts Talent Show! (Applause.) And we’ve spruced it up here. This year, we’ve upped it. We got lighting and all kinds of atmosphere going on. (Laughter.)

    Let me start by thanking the National Endowment for the Arts and the Department of Education for their leadership and their love and their passion for this program.

    And of course, I want to recognize everyone from the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities for their outstanding work. Let’s just stop there for a moment. Because this isn’t in the remarks, so everybody is like, oh, no, what’s she going to say? (Laughter.) You all are champions. You have worked just so hard. You’ve delivered — (applause) — you have delivered on every possible wish, hope that I could have had. And I just thank you all for your wonderful work and your friendship.

    I want to thank Kathy Fletcher, the National Director for Turnaround Arts, for her great work. (Applause.) I want to thank two champions, George and Margo. You two, man, thank you, thank you, thank you, thank you. You have led this so gracefully and passionately. I’m indebted to you, but I love you. Thank you both. (Applause.)

    For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/05/25/remarks-first-lady-turnaround-arts-talent-show

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