Asian Americans Take A Stand: Black Lives Matter To Us, Too

Asian Americans Take A Stand: Black Lives Matter To Us, Too

7/10/16 Jeena Cho CONTRIBUTOR – washingtonpost

It’s difficult to process and make sense of the recent tragedies. The killing of black men by the police, as well as the killings of police officers. I’ve personally been struggling with a sense of hopelessness, helplessness, outrage and deep sadness. Perhaps you are as well. I find myself endlessly scrolling through my Facebook and Twitter feed, feeling ever more traumatized. Not knowing what I can do to contribute, to help.

According to the book Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Servicespeople respond to trauma in different ways. “The impact of trauma can be subtle, insidious or outright destructive. How an event affects an individual depends on many factors, including characteristics of the individual, the type and characteristics of the event(s), developmental processes, the meaning of the trauma and sociocultural factors.” Each of us must find our own way of working through trauma. What we know from the research is that taking constructive actions can help to process trauma. People are “resilient and develop appropriate coping strategies, including the use of social supports, to deal with the aftermath and effects of trauma.”

Earlier yesterday, I came across a post in my Facebook feed, titled: “Dear Mom, Dad, Uncle, Auntie: Black Lives Matter to Us, Too.” It’s a collective effort of the Asian American community to have difficult conversations about the Black Lives Matter movement, in particular with the older generation. Christina Xu, an ethnographer and writer, and other Asian-American activists wrote the letter to their families. Within a few days, hundreds of people contributed and collaborated using Google Docs to write the letter, translate it into over 20 languages, self-organized to make videos of Asian Americans reading the letter, record audio versions of the letter and created a community on Facebook as well as a Slack group.

The letter starts with:

Mom, Dad, Uncle, Auntie, Grandfather, Grandmother: We need to talk.

You may not have grown up around people who are Black, but I have. Black people are a fundamental part of my life: they are my friends, my classmates and teammates, my roommates, my family. Today, I’m scared for them.

For more: http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeenacho/2016/07/10/asian-americans-take-a-stand-black-lives-matter-to-us-too/#374f24fe48f6

#Asians4BlackLives

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10 thoughts on “Asian Americans Take A Stand: Black Lives Matter To Us, Too

  1. WH

    Tuesday, July 12, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama departs White House
    South Lawn

    10:15 AM
    President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama depart Joint Base Andrews en route to Dallas, Texas

    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    1:15 PM
    President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive Dallas, Texas
    Dallas Love Field, Dallas, Texas

    1:40 PM
    President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama attend an interfaith memorial service for the fallen Dallas police officers
    Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, Dallas, Texas

    President Obama delivers remarks at an interfaith memorial service for the fallen Dallas police officers
    Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, Dallas, Texas

    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    3:20 PM
    President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama meet privately with the families of the police officers killed in the shooting
    Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, Dallas, Texas

    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    5:35 PM
    President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama depart Dallas, Texas’
    Dallas Love Field, Dallas, Texas

    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    7:55 PM
    President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive Joint Base Andrews

    8:00 PM
    8:10 PM
    President Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama arrive White House
    South Lawn

    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  2. Asian Americans Take A Stand: Black Lives Matter To Us, Too

    7/10/16 Jeena Cho CONTRIBUTOR – washingtonpost

    It’s difficult to process and make sense of the recent tragedies. The killing of black men by the police, as well as the killings of police officers. I’ve personally been struggling with a sense of hopelessness, helplessness, outrage and deep sadness. Perhaps you are as well. I find myself endlessly scrolling through my Facebook and Twitter feed, feeling ever more traumatized. Not knowing what I can do to contribute, to help.

    According to the book Trauma-Informed Care in Behavioral Health Servicespeople respond to trauma in different ways. “The impact of trauma can be subtle, insidious or outright destructive. How an event affects an individual depends on many factors, including characteristics of the individual, the type and characteristics of the event(s), developmental processes, the meaning of the trauma and sociocultural factors.” Each of us must find our own way of working through trauma. What we know from the research is that taking constructive actions can help to process trauma. People are “resilient and develop appropriate coping strategies, including the use of social supports, to deal with the aftermath and effects of trauma.”

    Earlier yesterday, I came across a post in my Facebook feed, titled: “Dear Mom, Dad, Uncle, Auntie: Black Lives Matter to Us, Too.” It’s a collective effort of the Asian American community to have difficult conversations about the Black Lives Matter movement, in particular with the older generation. Christina Xu, an ethnographer and writer, and other Asian-American activists wrote the letter to their families. Within a few days, hundreds of people contributed and collaborated using Google Docs to write the letter, translate it into over 20 languages, self-organized to make videos of Asian Americans reading the letter, record audio versions of the letter and created a community on Facebook as well as a Slack group.

    The letter starts with:

    Mom, Dad, Uncle, Auntie, Grandfather, Grandmother: We need to talk.

    You may not have grown up around people who are Black, but I have. Black people are a fundamental part of my life: they are my friends, my classmates and teammates, my roommates, my family. Today, I’m scared for them.

    For more: http://www.forbes.com/sites/jeenacho/2016/07/10/asian-americans-take-a-stand-black-lives-matter-to-us-too/#374f24fe48f6

  3. July 12, 2016

    Remarks by the President at Memorial Service for Fallen Dallas Police Officers

    Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center
    Dallas, Texas

    1:46 P.M. CDT

    THE PRESIDENT: Mr. President and Mrs. Bush; my friend, the Vice President, and Dr. Biden; Mayor Rawlings; Chief Spiller; clergy; members of Congress; Chief Brown — I’m so glad I met Michelle first, because she loves Stevie Wonder — (laughter and applause) — but most of all, to the families and friends and colleagues and fellow officers:

    Scripture tells us that in our sufferings there is glory, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope. Sometimes the truths of these words are hard to see. Right now, those words test us. Because the people of Dallas, people across the country, are suffering.

    We’re here to honor the memory, and mourn the loss, of five fellow Americans — to grieve with their loved ones, to support this community, to pray for the wounded, and to try and find some meaning amidst our sorrow.

    For the men and women who protect and serve the people of Dallas, last Thursday began like any other day. Like most Americans each day, you get up, probably have too quick a breakfast, kiss your family goodbye, and you head to work. But your work, and the work of police officers across the country, is like no other. For the moment you put on that uniform, you have answered a call that at any moment, even in the briefest interaction, may put your life in harm’s way.

    Lorne Ahrens, he answered that call. So did his wife, Katrina — not only because she was the spouse of a police officer, but because she’s a detective on the force. They have two kids. And Lorne took them fishing, and used to proudly go to their school in uniform. And the night before he died, he bought dinner for a homeless man. And the next night, Katrina had to tell their children that their dad was gone. “They don’t get it yet,” their grandma said. “They don’t know what to do quite yet.”

    Michael Krol answered that call. His mother said, “He knew the dangers of the job, but he never shied away from his duty.” He came a thousand miles from his home state of Michigan to be a cop in Dallas, telling his family, “This is something I wanted to do.” Last year, he brought his girlfriend back to Detroit for Thanksgiving, and it was the last time he’d see his family.

    For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/07/12/remarks-president-memorial-service-fallen-dallas-police-officers

  4. WH

    Wednesday, July 13, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    12:30 PM
    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    2:45 PM
    President Obama hosts a “Conversation on Community Policing and Criminal Justice” with Academics, Activists, Civil Rights Leaders, Law Enforcement Officials, Local Political Leaders from across the country
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building

    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    4:45 PM
    Vice President Biden Delivers Remarks on Trade Enforcement
    San Diego, CA

    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  5. POTUS podium

    July 13, 2016

    WhiteHouse.gov http://www.whitehouse.gov/live

    12:30 PM ET
    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

    2:45 PM ET
    President Obama hosts a “Conversation on Community Policing and Criminal Justice” with Academics, Activists, Civil Rights Leaders, Law Enforcement Officials, Local Political Leaders from across the country
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building

    —-

    CSPAN http://www.cspan.org/

    12:30 PM ET
    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

    2:00 PM ET
    State Department Deputy Mark Toner briefs reporters and responds to their questions on a variety of international topics. https://www.c-span.org/video/?412677-1/state-department-briefing

    2:30 PM ET
    Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere, Transnational Crime, Civilian Security, Democracy, Human Rights and Global Women’s Issues
    Zika Virus Prevention Efforts
    Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control, testified along with State Department and USAID officials at a hearing on Zika virus prevention efforts.

    2:30 PM EDT
    Zika Virus Prevention Efforts Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control, testifies along with State Department and USAID officials at a Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee hearing on Zika virus prevention efforts. http://www.c-span.org/video/?412424-1/dr-tom-frieden-testifies-zika-virus-prevention-efforts

    2:45 PM ET
    President Obama hosts a “Conversation on Community Policing and Criminal Justice” with Academics, Activists, Civil Rights Leaders, Law Enforcement Officials, Local Political Leaders from across the country
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building

    2:45 PM EDT
    College Campus Safety Representatives from several universities, security experts, and advocates testify at a Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee hearing on college campus safety, including concerns about bullying, hazing, and sexual assault. http://www.c-span.org/video/?412640-1/hearing-focuses-college-campus-safety

  6. 2:45 PM ET
    President Obama hosts a “Conversation on Community Policing and Criminal Justice” with Academics, Activists, Civil Rights Leaders, Law Enforcement Officials, Local Political Leaders from across the country
    Eisenhower Executive Office Building

  7. *******************
    THIS POST IS NOW CLOSED NBLB

    Come on over to my newest post titled: ” President Obama Town’s Hall on Race & Policing″

    ********************

    To get to the newest post click on “HOME” at the top of the thread

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