Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 – 26th Anniversary

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) is a wide-ranging civil rights law that is intended to protect against discrimination based on disability. Enacted by the U.S. Congress in 1990, it affords similar protections against discrimination to Americans with disabilities as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which made discrimination based on racereligionsex, national origin, and other characteristics illegal. In addition, unlike the Civil Rights Act, the ADA also requires covered employers to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities, and imposes accessibility requirements on public accommodations.

In 1986, the National Council on Disability had recommended enactment of an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and drafted the first version of the bill which was introduced in the House and Senate in 1988. The final version of the bill was signed into law on July 26, 1990, by President George H. W. Bush. It was later amended in 2008 and signed by President George W. Bush with changes effective as of January 1, 2009.

For more:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americans_with_Disabilities_Act_of_1990

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The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in employment, transportation, public accommodation, communications, and governmental activities. The ADA also establishes requirements for telecommunications relay services.

The Department of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) provides publications and other technical assistance on the basic requirements of the ADA. It does not enforce any part of the law.

In addition to the Department of Labor, four federal agencies enforce the ADA:

For more: https://www.dol.gov/general/topic/disability/ada

#ADA26

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18 thoughts on “Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 – 26th Anniversary

  1. WH

    Wednesday, July 27, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    9:15 AM
    Vice President Biden greets the Delaware Delegation
    McGillin’s Olde Ale House, Washington DC

    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    8:50 PM
    President Obama departs White House
    South Lawn

    9:00 PM
    Vice President Biden delivers remarks at the 2016 Democratic National Convention
    Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    9:05 PM
    President Obama departs Joint Base Andrews

    9:50 PM
    President Obama arrives Philadelphia

    10:00 PM
    10:30 PM
    President Obama delivers remarks at the 2016 Democratic National Convention
    Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    11:00 PM
    11:40 PM
    President Obama departs Philadelphia
    12:00 AM
    12:30 AM
    President Obama arrives Joint Base Andrews

    12:35 AM
    President Obama arrives White House
    South Lawn

  2. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) is a wide-ranging civil rights law that is intended to protect against discrimination based on disability. Enacted by the U.S. Congress in 1990, it affords similar protections against discrimination to Americans with disabilities as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which made discrimination based on race, religion, sex, national origin, and other characteristics illegal. In addition, unlike the Civil Rights Act, the ADA also requires covered employers to provide reasonable accommodations to employees with disabilities, and imposes accessibility requirements on public accommodations.

    In 1986, the National Council on Disability had recommended enactment of an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and drafted the first version of the bill which was introduced in the House and Senate in 1988. The final version of the bill was signed into law on July 26, 1990, by President George H. W. Bush. It was later amended in 2008 and signed by President George W. Bush with changes effective as of January 1, 2009.

    For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americans_with_Disabilities_Act_of_1990

  3. Minorities in the U.S. Armed Forces

    Executive Order 9981 – Abolish Racial Discrimination in Armed Forces

    Executive Order 9981 is an executive order issued on July 26, 1948 by President Harry S. Truman (D). It abolished racial discrimination in the armed forces and eventually led to the end of segregation in the services.

    In 1947, A. Philip Randolph, along with colleague Grant Reynolds, renewed efforts to end discrimination in the armed services, forming the Committee Against Jim Crow in Military Service and Training, later renamed the League for Non-Violent Civil Disobedience Against Military Segregation.

    Truman’s Order expanded on Executive Order 8802 by establishing equality of treatment and opportunity in the Armed Services for people of all races, religions, or national origins.

    The Order’s operative statement is:

    It is hereby declared to be the policy of the President that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin. This policy shall be put into effect as rapidly as possible, having due regard to the time required to effectuate any necessary changes without impairing efficiency or morale.

    The order also established a committee to investigate and make recommendations to the civilian leadership of the military to implement the policy.

    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Executive_Order_9981

    ——————

    African Americans Military History: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_history_of_African_Americans

    Asian Americans Military History: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_history_of_Asian_Americans

    Hispanic-Americans in the U.S. Army: http://bit.ly/1jXY4Fh

    Native Americans in the U.S. Army: http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq61-1.htm

  4. Fed Says Risks Have Diminished as It Leaves Rate Unchanged

    July 27, 2016 Craig Torres – bloomberg

    The Federal Reserve left interest rates unchanged while saying risks to the U.S. economy have subsided and the labor market is getting tighter, suggesting conditions are getting more favorable for an increase in borrowing costs.

    “Near-term risks to the economic outlook have diminished,” the Federal Open Market Committee said in its statement Wednesday after a two-day meeting in Washington, before repeating language from June that the panel “continues to closely monitor” inflation and global developments. Job gains were “strong” in June and indicators “point to some increase in labor utilization in recent months,” the Fed said.

    U.S. central bankers are taking stock of the economy’s progress in the wake of the U.K.’s vote last month to leave the European Union, as well as the large swing from May’s soft labor report to June’s rebound. While Chair Janet Yellen has repeatedly stated that the Fed is likely to raise interest rates gradually, market volatility and the unexpected dip in job gains have delayed such plans.

    “It’s kind of an upbeat statement, although guarded,” said Roberto Perli, partner at Cornerstone Macro LLC in Washington and former associate director for monetary affairs at the Fed Board. “It’s a sign of a little bit of confidence, if you want, in the outlook going forward.”

    For more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-07-27/fed-says-risks-have-diminished-as-it-leaves-main-rate-unchanged

    • 9:00 PM ET
      Vice President Biden delivers remarks at the 2016 Democratic National Convention
      Wells Fargo Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    • July 28, 2016

      Remarks by the President at the Democratic National Convention

      Wells Fargo Center
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

      10:57 P.M. EDT

      THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. (Applause.) Thank you so much. Thank you, everybody. (Applause.) Thank you. (Applause.)

      AUDIENCE: Obama! Obama! Obama!

      AUDIENCE MEMBER: We love you!

      THE PRESIDENT: I love you back! (Applause.)

      Hello, America! Hello, Democrats! (Applause.)

      So 12 years ago tonight, I addressed this convention for the very first time. (Applause.) You met my two little girls, Malia and Sasha — now two amazing young women who just fill me with pride. (Applause.) You fell for my brilliant wife and partner Michelle — (applause) — who has made me a better father and a better man; who’s gone on to inspire our nation as First Lady — (applause) — and who somehow hasn’t aged a day. (Applause.)

      I know, the same can’t be said for me. (Laughter.) My girls remind me all the time. Wow, you’ve changed so much, Daddy (Laughter.) And then they try to clean it up — not bad, you’re just more mature. (Laughter.)

      And it’s true — I was so young that first time in Boston. (Applause.) And look, I’ll admit it, maybe I was a little nervous, addressing such a big crowd. But I was filled with faith; faith in America — the generous, big-hearted, hopeful country that made my story — that made all of our stories — possible.

      A lot has happened over the years. And while this nation has been tested by war, and it’s been tested by recession and all manner of challenges — I stand before you again tonight, after almost two terms as your President, to tell you I am more optimistic about the future of America than ever before. (Applause.)

      How could I not be — after all that we’ve achieved together? After the worst recession in 80 years, we fought our way back. We’ve seen deficits come down, 401(k)s recover, an auto industry set new records, unemployment reach eight-year lows, and our businesses create 15 million new jobs. (Applause.)

      After a century of trying, we declared that health care in America is not a privilege for a few, it is a right for everybody. (Applause.) After decades of talk, we finally began to wean ourselves off foreign oil. We doubled our production of clean energy. (Applause.) We brought more of our troops home to their families, and we delivered justice to Osama bin Laden. (Applause.) Through diplomacy, we shut down Iran’s nuclear weapons program. (Applause.) We opened up a new chapter with the people of Cuba, brought nearly 200 nations together around a climate agreement that could save this planet for our children. (Applause.)

      We put policies in place to help students with loans; protect consumers from fraud; cut veteran homelessness almost in half. (Applause.) And through countless acts of quiet courage, America learned that love has no limits, and marriage equality is now a reality across the land. (Applause.)

      By so many measures, our country is stronger and more prosperous than it was when we started. And through every victory and every setback, I’ve insisted that change is never easy, and never quick; that we wouldn’t meet all of our challenges in one term, or one presidency, or even in one lifetime.

      So, tonight, I’m here to tell you that, yes, we’ve still got more work to do. More work to do for every American still in need of a good job or a raise, paid leave or a decent retirement; for every child who needs a sturdier ladder out of poverty or a world-class education; for everyone who has not yet felt the progress of these past seven and a half years. We need to keep making our streets safer and our criminal justice system fairer
      — (applause) — our homeland more secure, our world more peaceful and sustainable for the next generation. (Applause.) We’re not done perfecting our union, or living up to our founding creed that all of us are created equal; all of us are free in the eyes of God. (Applause.)

      And that work involves a big choice this November. I think it’s fair to say, this is not your typical election. It’s not just a choice between parties or policies; the usual debates between left and right. This is a more fundamental choice — about who we are as a people, and whether we stay true to this great American experiment in self-government.

      For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/07/28/remarks-president-democratic-national-convention

  5. WH

    Thursday, July 28, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

    President Obama meet with his counterterrorism and homeland security teams as part of the Administration’s regular review of threats posed by ISIL, al-Qa’ida, and other terrorist groups to the United States

    Vice President Biden and Dr. Biden meet privately with the families of the fallen police officers and those who were injured
    Baton Rouge Healing Place Church, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    Vice President Biden, Dr. Jill Biden and Attorney General Loretta Lynchattend the vigil for the slain of Baton Rouge police officers

    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  6. International Trade in Goods

    Released On 7/28/2016 8:30:00 AM For June, 2016

    Prior Prior Revised Consensus Consensus Range Actual
    Balance $-60.6 B $61.1 B $-61.1 B $-62.7 B to $-60.2 B $-63.3 B
    Exports % change -0.2 %
    Imports % change 1.6 %

    Highlights
    Exports of goods improved in June though imports rose even more, making for a $63.3 billion goods deficit in the month. The mix will pull down tomorrow’s second-quarter GDP report, where exports are a subtraction, but nevertheless is a welcome sign of strength in cross-border demand.

    Exports rose 0.9 percent led by gains for foods and for consumer goods. Exports of capital goods, which have been weak, posted a solid monthly gain, also at 0.9 percent. The import side shows a big gain for industrial supplies where price inflation for oil is at play but also a 1.2 percent gain for capital goods imports and a second very strong gain for the leading component, consumer goods which rose 3.3 percent following May’s 2.7 percent. Gains in imports of consumer goods point to business confidence in consumer demand.

    Source: http://www.econoday.com/economic-calendar.aspx

  7. 3:00 PM ET
    Vice President Biden, Dr. Jill Biden and Attorney General Loretta Lynch attend the vigil for the slain of Baton Rouge police officers
    Baton Rouge Healing Place Church, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

  8. July 28, 2016

    Readout of the President’s Meeting with Counterterrorism and Homeland Security Officials

    The President today met with his counterterrorism and homeland security teams as part of the Administration’s regular review of threats posed by ISIL, al-Qa’ida, and other terrorist groups to the United States, U.S. persons overseas, and to our allies and partners. Noting the recent spate of heinous attacks in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia, the President directed his team to ensure we remain vigilant and best postured to defend against such attacks in the Homeland. He stressed the imperative of continuing to increase battlefield pressure on ISIL and other terrorist groups as well as making further progress against terrorist efforts to recruit, radicalize and mobilize individuals to violence. Additionally, the President’s team updated him on security preparations and U.S. support to the Government of Brazil as athletes and spectators from around the world travel to Rio de Janeiro for the upcoming Olympic Games. In this context, the President also was briefed on our efforts to protect against the spread of Zika.

  9. WH

    Friday, July 29, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

    Vice President Biden tapes an appearance on “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” on the rape kit backlog and efforts to end violence against women
    New York, New York

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    11:30 AM
    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    President Obama meets with Secretary of State Kerry

    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
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  10. Navy oiler to be named after gay rights activist Harvey Milk

    10:30 a.m. EDT July 29, 2016 Meghann Myers, Navy Times

    Editor’s note: This article first posted at 6:08 p.m. on July 28 and has been updated.

    Pioneering gay rights activist and former Navy diver Harvey Milk is set to have a fleet oiler named after him, according to a leaked congressional notification.

    Navy Secretary Ray Mabus sent a letter to Capitol Hill on July 14, according to a Navy official, to inform lawmakers that he intends to name a Military Sealift Command ship after the politician, who became the first openly gay person to hold public office in California in 1978.

    Mabus’ office declined to comment on the issue until an official ship-naming release is sent out, spokesman Lt. Eric Durie told Navy Times.

    Milk, the son of two Navy veterans, served as a diving officer aboard the submarine rescue ship Kittiwake during World War II, then served as a diving instructor at Naval Base San Diego before his honorable discharge as a lieutenant junior grade in 1955.

    A prominent member of San Francisco’s LGBT community during the 1970s, Milk was elected to represent the 5th district on the San Francisco board of supervisors, taking office in early 1978. In November that year, he was shot and killed along with San Francisco Mayor George Moscone by fellow supervisor Dan White.

    For more: http://www.navytimes.com/story/military/2016/07/28/navy-oiler-named-after-gay-rights-activist-harvey-milk/87666452/

  11. West Wing Week 7/29/16 or, “You Think I’m Spry Now”

    Published on Jul 29, 2016

    This week, we celebrated the 26th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The President welcomed another President – from Mexico, sat down for some candid interviews, and inspired our current class of interns. That’s July 22nd to July 28th or, “You Think I’m Spry Now.”

  12. *******************
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    Come on over to my newest post titled: ”Help in Finding Missing Persons ″

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