Help in Finding Missing Persons

NamUs pdf

National Missing and Unidentified Persons System

About NamUs

Although the problem of missing persons and unidentified human remains in this country has existed for a long time, significant progress has been made in recent years. In 2003, the DNA Initiative was launched. The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice (NIJ) began funding major efforts to maximize the use of DNA technology in our criminal justice system. Much of NIJ’s work has focused on developing tools to investigate and solve the cases of missing persons and unidentified decedents.

The NamUs databases are just one element of a broader program to improve the Nation’s capacity to address these cases. For example, NIJ also funds free testing of unidentified human remains and provides family reference-sample kits, at no charge, to any jurisdiction in the country. Other efforts include training law enforcement officers, medical examiners, judges, and attorneys on forensic DNA evidence.

In the spring of 2005, NIJ assembled Federal, State, and local law enforcement officials, medical examiners and coroners, forensic scientists, key policymakers, and victim advocates and families from around the country for a national strategy meeting in Philadelphia. The meeting, called the “Identifying the Missing Summit,” defined major challenges in investigating and solving missing persons and unidentified decedent cases. As a result of that summit, the Deputy Attorney General created the National Missing Persons Task Force and charged the U.S. Department of Justice with identifying every available tool—and creating others—to solve these cases. The National Missing Persons Task Force identified the need to improve access to database information by people who can help solve missing persons and unidentified decedent cases. NamUs was created to meet that need.

The NamUs reporting and searching system will improve the quantity and quality of—and access to—data on missing persons and unidentified human remains. Through NamUs, a diverse community of criminal justice professionals, medical examiners and coroners, victim advocates, families of missing persons, and the general public now can contribute to solving these cases.

For more: http://www.namus.gov/about.htm

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ICMP banner

ICMP works with governments, civil society organizations, justice institutions, international organizations and others throughout the world to address the issue of people who have gone missing as a result of armed conflict, human rights abuses, disasters, organized crime and other causes.

As the only international organization that is exclusively dedicated to this issue, ICMP is actively engaged in developing institutions and civil society capacity, promoting legislation, fostering social and political advocacy, and developing and providing technical expertise to locate and identify the missing.

ICMP works with governments to develop their institutional capacity to address the issue of missing persons efficiently and impartially.

ICMP helps governments develop legislation to safeguard the rights of families of the missing, and it works with civil society organizations to empower them to advocate for their rights.

ICMP assists the process of justice by ensuring that governments adhere to a rule of law-based approach to investigating disappearances and it provides evidence in criminal trials.

ICMP directly assists governments with fieldwork. It has been involved in the excavation of more than 3,000 mass and clandestine gravesites and has spearheaded the application of advanced forensic techniques to locate and recover missing persons.

ICMP maintains a unique, specialized online missing persons database (fDMS) that manages all data pertaining to its missing persons process.

It operates the world’s leading high-throughput DNA human identification facility. To date, more than 19,000 missing persons from around the world have been identified with ICMP’s assistance.

For more: http://www.icmp.int/about-us/

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“As Commander-in-Chief, my highest responsibility is to provide for the safety and security of American citizens at home and abroad. My message to every American being held hostage and to their families is that we will spare no effort to secure the safety of our citizens. These policy and organizational changes will ensure that we are doing everything possible to safely recover Americans taken hostage overseas, while being responsive to the needs of their families. And no matter how long it takes, we will bring to justice those responsible for abducting Americans abroad.”

June 2015 President Barack Obama

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August 1 – 6, 2016
National Missing Persons Week 

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#missing

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8 thoughts on “Help in Finding Missing Persons

  1. WH

    Saturday, July 30, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

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  2. Help in Finding Missing Persons

    National Missing and Unidentified Persons System

    About NamUs

    Although the problem of missing persons and unidentified human remains in this country has existed for a long time, significant progress has been made in recent years. In 2003, the DNA Initiative was launched. The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice (NIJ) began funding major efforts to maximize the use of DNA technology in our criminal justice system. Much of NIJ’s work has focused on developing tools to investigate and solve the cases of missing persons and unidentified decedents.

    The NamUs databases are just one element of a broader program to improve the Nation’s capacity to address these cases. For example, NIJ also funds free testing of unidentified human remains and provides family reference-sample kits, at no charge, to any jurisdiction in the country. Other efforts include training law enforcement officers, medical examiners, judges, and attorneys on forensic DNA evidence.

    In the spring of 2005, NIJ assembled Federal, State, and local law enforcement officials, medical examiners and coroners, forensic scientists, key policymakers, and victim advocates and families from around the country for a national strategy meeting in Philadelphia. The meeting, called the “Identifying the Missing Summit,” defined major challenges in investigating and solving missing persons and unidentified decedent cases. As a result of that summit, the Deputy Attorney General created the National Missing Persons Task Force and charged the U.S. Department of Justice with identifying every available tool—and creating others—to solve these cases. The National Missing Persons Task Force identified the need to improve access to database information by people who can help solve missing persons and unidentified decedent cases. NamUs was created to meet that need.

    The NamUs reporting and searching system will improve the quantity and quality of—and access to—data on missing persons and unidentified human remains. Through NamUs, a diverse community of criminal justice professionals, medical examiners and coroners, victim advocates, families of missing persons, and the general public now can contribute to solving these cases.

    For more: http://www.namus.gov/about.htm

    • NamUs National Missing and Unidentified Persons System

      Published on Feb 22, 2015

      The staggering number of missing and unidentified person cases in the United States has been deemed our nation’s “Silent Mass Disaster.” The sheer volume of these cases poses a significant challenge to law enforcement, medical examiners, coroners and family members searching to locate missing loved ones.

  3. July 30, 2016

    Weekly Address: It’s Time to Fill the Vacancy on the Supreme Court

    Remarks of Vice President Joe Biden and Retired Federal Judge Timothy Lewis as Prepared for Delivery
    Weekly Address
    The White House

    July 30, 2016

    THE VICE PRESIDENT: Hi, folks. Joe Biden here and I’m sitting with Tim Lewis, a retired federal judge who was nominated to the bench by a Republican President and confirmed by a Democratic Senate—within four weeks of a presidential election.

    JUDGE LEWIS: Hello, everyone. That’s right. And I’m living proof that President Obama’s nominee to the Supreme Court—Chief Judge Merrick Garland—deserves similar consideration by today’s Senate.

    THE VICE PRESIDENT: Not only because Merrick Garland is recognized—without exception—by the right and the left as one of America’s sharpest legal minds and a model of integrity.

    JUDGE LEWIS: But also because that’s what the Constitution requires. The sitting President shall—not may—but shall nominate someone to fill a vacancy on the Supreme Court, with the advice and consent of the Senate. That includes consulting and voting.

    THE VICE PRESIDENT: Here’s how it works. For 17 years, I was chairman or ranking member of Senate Judiciary Committee, which overseas nominations to the Court. I presided over nine total nominations—more than anyone alive. Some I supported. Others I didn’t. But every nominee was greeted by committee members. Every nominee got a committee hearing. Every nominee got out of the committee to the Senate floor, even when a nominee did not receive majority support in my committee. And every nominee, including Justice Kennedy—in an election year—got an up or down vote by the Senate. Not much of the time. Not most of the time. Every single time. That’s the Constitution’s clear rule of Advice and Consent. And that’s the rule being violated today by Senate Republicans.

    Nobody is suggesting that Senators have to vote “yes” on a nominee. Voting “no” is always an option. But saying nothing, seeing nothing, reading nothing, hearing nothing, and deciding in advance simply to turn your backs—is not an option the Constitution leaves open.

    JUDGE LEWIS: And it has real consequences for all of us. In the four months since Merrick Garland’s nomination, we’ve already seen how the Senate’s refusal to act is preventing the Court from fulfilling its duty of interpreting what the law is and resolving conflicts in lower courts. Historic obstruction is leading to greater litigation costs and delays—the burden falling mostly on average Americans rather than corporations with endless resources. Unresolved decisions by the Supreme Court are leading to federal laws that should apply to the whole country being constitutional in some parts but unconstitutional in others. If this continues, our freedom of speech, our freedom to practice our faith, our right to vote, our right to privacy—all could depend on where we happen to live.

    THE VICE PRESIDENT: And the longer the vacancy remains unfilled, the more serious the problem—with greater confusion and uncertainty about our safety and security. If you have eight Justices on a case, Justice Scalia himself wrote, that it raises the, “possibility that, by reason of a tie vote, the Court will find itself unable to resolve the significant legal issue presented by the case.” And if Republican Senators fail to act, it could be an entire year before a fully staffed Supreme Court can resolve any significant issue before it.

    Folks, there’s enough dysfunction in Washington, D.C. Now is not the time for it to spread to the Supreme Court.

    For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/weekly-address

  4. WH

    Sunday, July 31, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

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    THIS POST IS NOW CLOSED NBLB

    Come on over to my newest post titled: ”WH State Dinner for Sinaporian Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong ″

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