Civil Liberties Act of 1988 – 28th Anniversary

US Japanese American Relocation Camp Map

Honouliuli Internment Camp, Kunia, Hawai'i
Honouliuli Internment Camp, Kunia, Hawai’i

The Civil Liberties Act of 1988 (Pub.L. 100–383, title I, August 10, 1988, 102 Stat. 90450a U.S.C. § 1989b et seq.) is a United States federal law that granted reparations to Japanese Americans who had been interned by the United States government during World War II. The act was sponsored by California‘s Democratic Congressman Norman Mineta, an internee as a child, and Wyoming‘s Republican Senator Alan K. Simpson, who first met Mineta while visiting an internment camp. The third co-sponsor was California Senator Pete Wilson. The bill was supported by the majority of Democrats in Congress, while the majority of Republicans voted against it. The act was signed into law by President Ronald Reagan.

The act granted each surviving internee about US $20,000 in compensation (or, $40,000 after inflation-adjustment in 2016 dollars), with payments beginning in 1990. The legislation stated that government actions were based on “race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership” as opposed to legitimate security reasons. A total of 82,219 received redress checks.

Because the law was restricted to American citizens or legal permanent residents, the ethnic Japanese that had been taken from their homes in Latin America (mostly from Peru) were not covered in the reparations, regardless of whether they remained in the United States, returned to Latin America or were deported to Japan after the war. In 1996, Carmen Mochizuki filed a class-action lawsuit, and won a settlement of around $5,000 per person to those eligible from what was left of the funds from the CLA. 145 of those affected were able to receive the $5,000 settlement before the funds ran out. In 1999, funds were approved for the attorney general to pay out to the rest of the claimants.

For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Liberties_Act_of_1988

Japanese Americans Incarceration Camps

President Barack Obama signed S.1055, a bill to grant the Congressional Gold Medal, collectively, to the 100th Infantry Battalion and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, in recognition of their dedicated service during World War II. October 5, 2010
President Barack Obama signed S.1055, a bill to grant the Congressional Gold Medal, collectively, to the 100th Infantry Battalion and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, in recognition of their dedicated service during World War II. October 5, 2010

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US Minorities Civil Rights Timeline 1863-1963 (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

US Minorities Civil Rights Timeline 1964-2016 (ProPresObama.org Civil Rights Timelines ™)

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5 thoughts on “Civil Liberties Act of 1988 – 28th Anniversary

  1. WH

    Wednesday, August 10, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing
    Cape Cod, Massachusetts

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  2. Civil Liberties Act of 1988 – 28th Anniversary

    The Civil Liberties Act of 1988 (Pub.L. 100–383, title I, August 10, 1988, 102 Stat. 904, 50a U.S.C. § 1989b et seq.) is a United States federal law that granted reparations to Japanese Americans who had been interned by the United States government during World War II. The act was sponsored by California’s Democratic Congressman Norman Mineta, an internee as a child, and Wyoming’s Republican Senator Alan K. Simpson, who first met Mineta while visiting an internment camp. The third co-sponsor was California Senator Pete Wilson. The bill was supported by the majority of Democrats in Congress, while the majority of Republicans voted against it. The act was signed into law by President Ronald Reagan.

    The act granted each surviving internee about US $20,000 in compensation (or, $40,000 after inflation-adjustment in 2016 dollars), with payments beginning in 1990. The legislation stated that government actions were based on “race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership” as opposed to legitimate security reasons. A total of 82,219 received redress checks.

    Because the law was restricted to American citizens or legal permanent residents, the ethnic Japanese that had been taken from their homes in Latin America (mostly from Peru) were not covered in the reparations, regardless of whether they remained in the United States, returned to Latin America or were deported to Japan after the war. In 1996, Carmen Mochizuki filed a class-action lawsuit, and won a settlement of around $5,000 per person to those eligible from what was left of the funds from the CLA. 145 of those affected were able to receive the $5,000 settlement before the funds ran out. In 1999, funds were approved for the attorney general to pay out to the rest of the claimants.

    For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Liberties_Act_of_1988

  3. JOLTS ( Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey)

    Released On 8/10/2016 10:00:00 AM For Jun, 2016

    Prior Prior Revised Actual
    Job Openings 5.500 M 5.514 M 5.624 M

    Highlights
    Job openings rose 2.0 percent in June to a 5.624 million annualized rate from May’s comparatively soft revised rate of 5.514 million. Openings peaked in April at 5.845 million, averaging 5.682 million over the first four months of the year. The June hires rate rose 1 tenth to 3.6 percent.

    Openings in professional & business services, a sensitive category where gains point to general hiring strength ahead, rose 2.1 percent from May to 1.054 million. Construction and manufacturing were both higher.

    The breakup side of the report shows a decline in separations, down 1 tenth to a 3.4 percent rate, and a 1 tenth dip in the layoffs rate to 1.1 percent. The quits rate, which offers indications on worker confidence to shift jobs, is once again unchanged, at 2.0 percent. This report shows new punch on the hiring side and favorable conditions on the breakup side in what is the latest good news out of the labor market.

    Source: http://www.econoday.com/economic-calendar.aspx

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