2016 ASEAN Summit & EAS Summit

Asean Laos

Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) is a forum for 21 Pacific Rim member economies that seeks to promote free trade and economic cooperation throughout the Asia-Pacific region. It was established in 1989 in response to the growing interdependence of Asia-Pacific economies and the advent of regional trade blocs in other parts of the world; to fears that highly industrialized Japan (a member of G8) would come to dominate economic activity in the Asia-Pacific region; and to establish new markets for agricultural products and raw materials beyond Europe (where demand had been declining). APEC works to raise living standards and education levels through sustainable economic growth and to foster a sense of community and an appreciation of shared interests among Asia-Pacific countries. APEC includes newly industrialized economies, although the agenda of free trade was a sensitive issue for the developing NIEs at the time APEC founded, and aims to enable ASEAN economies to explore new export market opportunities for natural resources such as natural gas, as well as to seek regional economic integration (industrial integration) by means of foreign direct investment. Members account for approximately 40% of the world’s population, approximately 54% of the world’s gross domestic product and about 44% of world trade.

An annual APEC Economic Leaders’ Meeting is attended by the heads of government of all APEC members except Taiwan (which is represented by a ministerial-level official under the name Chinese Taipei as economic leader). The location of the meeting rotates annually among the member economies, and a famous tradition, followed for most (but not all) summits, involves the attending leaders dressing in a national costume of the host country.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asia-Pacific_Economic_Cooperation

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President Obama’s Travel Itinerary

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Tuesday, September 6th

President Obama participates in an arrival ceremony
Presidential Palace, Vientiane, Laos

President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Laotian President Bounnhang Vorachith
Presidential Palace, Vientiane, Laos

President Obama meets with Laotian Prime Minister Thongloun Sisoulith
Presidential Palace, Vientiane, Laos

President Obama attends an official state luncheon
Presidential Palace, Vientiane, Laos

President Obama delivers remarks to the People of Laos
Lao National Cultural Hall , Vientiane, Laos

President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with President Park of the Republic of Korea
Landmark Mekong Riverside Hotel, Vientiane, Laos

President Obama meets with Embassy personnel and families
Landmark Mekong Riverside, Vientiane, Laos

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Wednesday, September 7th

President Obama participates in an EAS family photo
National Convention Centre, Vientiane, Laos

President Obama holds a press conference
Landmark Mekong Riverside Hotel, Vientiane, Laos

President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India
Landmark Mekong Riverside, Vientiane, Laos

President Obama tours Wat Xieng Thong temple
Luang Prabang, Laos

President Obama Holds a YSEALI Town Hall
Luang Prabang, Laos

President Obama tours Cooperative Orthotic and Prosthetic Enterprise (COPE) Visitor Centre
Vientiane, Laos

President Obama participates in an ASEAN – EAS welcome dinner and cultural performance
National Convention Centre, Vientiane, Laos

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Thursday, September 8th

President Obama participates in an ASEAN – EAS family photo
National Convention Centre, Vientiane, Laos

President Obama Holds a Press Conference
National Convention Centre, Vientiane, Laos

President Obama departs Laos en route to Japan
Wattay International Airport, Vientiane, Laos

President Obama arrives in Yokota, Japan and Air Force One refuels
Yokota Air Base, Japan

President Obama departs Japan en route to Alaska
Yokota Air Base, Japan

President Obama arrives in Achorage, Alaska and Air Force One refuels
Ted Stevens International Airport, Anchorage, Alaska

President Obama departs Achorage en route to Joint Base Andrews
Ted Stevens International Airport, Anchorage, Alaska

President Obama arrives Joint Base Andrews

President Obama departs Joint Base Andrews en route to White House

President Obama arrives White House

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ASEAN Summit / EAS Summit
September 6-8, 2016
Vientiane, Laos

http://www.asean.org\

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#ASEANSummit

#EAS

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18 thoughts on “2016 ASEAN Summit & EAS Summit

  1. WH

    Tuesday, September 6, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    12:00 AM
    12:25 AM
    President Obama attends an official state luncheon
    Presidential Palace, Vientiane, Laos

    1:00 AM
    2:00 AM
    2:25 AM
    President Obama delivers remarks to the People of Laos
    Lao National Cultural Hall Vientiane, Laos

    3:00 AM
    3:45 AM
    The President participates in an Embassy meet and greet
    Landmark Mekong Riverside

    4:00 AM
    5:00 AM

    5:10 AM
    President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with President Park of the Republic of Korea
    Landmark Mekong Riverside Hotel, Vientiane, Laos

    6:00 AM
    7:00 AM
    President Obama meets with Laotian Prime Minister Thongloun Sisoulith
    Vientiane, Laos

    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  2. 2016 ASEAN Summit & EAS Summit

    Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) is a forum for 21 Pacific Rim member economies that seeks to promote free trade and economic cooperation throughout the Asia-Pacific region. It was established in 1989 in response to the growing interdependence of Asia-Pacific economies and the advent of regional trade blocs in other parts of the world; to fears that highly industrialized Japan (a member of G8) would come to dominate economic activity in the Asia-Pacific region; and to establish new markets for agricultural products and raw materials beyond Europe (where demand had been declining). APEC works to raise living standards and education levels through sustainable economic growth and to foster a sense of community and an appreciation of shared interests among Asia-Pacific countries. APEC includes newly industrialized economies, although the agenda of free trade was a sensitive issue for the developing NIEs at the time APEC founded, and aims to enable ASEAN economies to explore new export market opportunities for natural resources such as natural gas, as well as to seek regional economic integration (industrial integration) by means of foreign direct investment. Members account for approximately 40% of the world’s population, approximately 54% of the world’s gross domestic product and about 44% of world trade.

    An annual APEC Economic Leaders’ Meeting is attended by the heads of government of all APEC members except Taiwan (which is represented by a ministerial-level official under the name Chinese Taipei as economic leader). The location of the meeting rotates annually among the member economies, and a famous tradition, followed for most (but not all) summits, involves the attending leaders dressing in a national costume of the host country.

    Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asia-Pacific_Economic_Cooperation

    • President Obama’s Travel Itinerary

      Tuesday, September 6th
      ————————————

      President Obama participates in an arrival ceremony
      Presidential Palace, Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Laotian President Bounnhang Vorachith
      Presidential Palace, Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama meets with Laotian Prime Minister Thongloun Sisoulith
      Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama attends an official state luncheon
      Presidential Palace, Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama delivers remarks to the People of Laos
      Lao National Cultural Hall Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with President Park of the Republic of Korea
      Landmark Mekong Riverside Hotel, Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama meets with Embassy personnel and families
      Landmark Mekong Riverside, Vientiane, Laos

      • President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Laotian President Bounnhang Vorachith
        Presidential Palace, Vientiane, Laos

      • September 06, 2016

        Remarks of President Obama to the People of Laos

        Lao National Cultural Hall
        Vientiane, Laos

        2:04 P.M. ICT

        THE PRESIDENT: Thank you so much. (Applause.) Thank you. Sabaidii! Sabaidee bor?

        AUDIENCE: Sabaidii.

        To the government and the people of Laos, thank you so much for the kind welcome that you’ve extended to me and my delegation. I am very honored to be the first American president to visit Laos. (Applause.) Thank you.

        I am told that this hall is where you come together for the national singing contest. And I know that you celebrate your musical traditions, including kap lam. But I’m not going to sing today, so you should not worry. As you host leaders from across Southeast Asia and beyond, I do want to thank Laos for your leadership as this year’s chair of ASEAN.

        Today, the eyes of the world are on Laos. And I know that that may be a little unusual, because Laos is a small nation next to larger neighbors and, as a result, too often, the richness of your culture has not been fully appreciated. And that’s why, as part of my visit, I’m grateful for the opportunity to know Laos better, and to help share your story with the world.

        I know that here, you cherish the beauty of the land — the mist-covered mountains and sunsets over the Mekong. The achievements of ancient civilizations that echo in the ruins of Vat Phou, and palm leaf manuscripts that are preserved at your temples. Tomorrow, I’ll experience some of this heritage myself when I visit Luang Prabang. I only regret that — I know this is called the Land of a Million Elephants, but Secret Service will not let me ride an elephant. (Laughter.) But maybe I’ll come back when I’m no longer President.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/09/06/remarks-president-obama-people-laos

      • September 06, 2016

        Remarks by President Obama and President Park of the Republic of Korea After Bilateral Meeting

        Landmark Mekong Riverside Hotel
        Vientiane, Laos

        5:01 P.M. ICT

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: It is always a pleasure to meet with my friend and partner, President Park of the Republic of Korea, and her delegation. As we all know, the ROK is one of America’s oldest and closest allies. Our alliance remains the lynchpin of peace and security not just on the Korean Peninsula, but across the region.

        In recent years, we’ve worked together to strengthen our alliance, and to ensure our readiness against any threat. For instance, our missile defense cooperation — THAAD — is a purely defensive system to deter and defend against North Korean threats. And today, I want to reaffirm that our commitment to the defense and security of North South Korea, including extended deterrence, is unwavering.

        We had extensive discussions about the recent provocations by the DPRK, and we are united in condemning North Korea’s continued missile launches, including this week while China was hosting the G20. These launches are provocative. They’re a violation of North Korea’s obligations internationally. Its nuclear and missile programs are a threat to not only the ROK, but to Japan, other allies in the region, partners in the region, and to the United States.

        So we are going to work diligently together with the most recent U.N. sanctions that are already placing North Korea under the most intense sanctions regime ever. We’re going to work together to make sure that we’re closing loopholes and making them even more effective. And President Park and I agreed that the entire international community needs to implement these sanctions fully and hold North Korea accountable.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/09/06/remarks-president-obama-and-president-park-republic-korea-after

    • President Obama’s Travel Itinerary

      Wednesday, September 7th
      —————————————-

      President Obama participates in an EAS family photo
      National Convention Centre, Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama holds a press conference
      Landmark Mekong Riverside Hotel, Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama holds a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India
      Landmark Mekong Riverside, Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama tours Wat Xieng Thong temple
      Luang Prabang, Laos

      President Obama Holds a YSEALI Town Hall
      Luang Prabang, Laos

      President Obama tours Cooperative Orthotic and Prosthetic Enterprise (COPE) Visitor Centre
      Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama participates in an ASEAN – EAS welcome dinner and cultural performance
      National Convention Centre, Vientiane, Laos

      • September 07, 2016

        Remarks by President Obama at the Cooperative Orthotic and Prosthetic Enterprise (COPE) Centre

        COPE Visitor Centre
        Vientiane, Laos

        10:44 A.M. ICT

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: Good morning, everybody. As you saw, we just had the opportunity to learn more about the very important work that’s being done here at the COPE Center, and about the magnitude of the challenge posed by unexploded ordnance.

        For many people, war is something that you read about in books — you learn the names of battles, the dates of conflicts, and you look at maps and images that depict events from long ago. For the United States, one of the wars from our history is the conflict called the Vietnam War. It’s a long and complicated conflict that took the lives of many brave young Americans. But we also know that despite its American name, what we call it, this war was not contained to Vietnam. It included many years of fighting and bombing in Cambodia and here in Laos. But for all those years in the 1960s and ‘70s, America’s intervention here in Laos was a secret to the American people, who were separated by vast distances and a Pacific Ocean, and there was no Internet, and information didn’t flow as easily.

        For the people of Laos, obviously, this war was no secret. Over the course of roughly a decade, the United States dropped more bombs on Laos than Germany and Japan during World War II. Some 270 million cluster bomblets were dropped on this country. You can see some of these displays showing everything that landed on relatively simple homes like this, and farms and rural areas. By some estimates, more bombs per capita were dropped on Laos than any other country in the world.

        For the people of Laos, war was also something that was not contained to a battlefield. In addition to soldiers and supply lines, bombs that fell from the sky killed and injured many civilians, leaving painful absences for so many families.

        For the people of Laos, the war did not end when the bombs stopped falling. Eighty million cluster munitions did not explode. They were spread across farmlands, jungles, villages, rivers. So for the last four decades, Laotians have continued to live under the shadow of war. Some 20,000 people have been killed or wounded by this unexploded ordnance, or UXO.

        For the people of Laos, then, these are not just statistics. These bomblets have taken the lives of farmers working in the fields, traders gathering scrap metal, children playing outside who thought these small, metal balls could be turned into a toy.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/09/07/remarks-president-obama-cooperative-orthotic-and-prosthetic-enterprise

      • September 07, 2016

        Remarks by President Obama at YSEALI Town Hall

        Souphanouvong University
        Luang Prabang, Laos

        1:49 P.M. ICT

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: Thank you! (Applause.) Thank you so much! Sabaidii!

        AUDIENCE: Sabaidii!

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: Well, it is such a pleasure to be here. Can everybody please give Om a big round of applause for that great introduction? (Applause.)

        So it is wonderful to be in Luang Prabang. I’ve always wanted to visit. It is said that this is where the Buddha smiled when he rested during his travels. And I can see why — because it is beautiful and relaxed. I’ve just come from seeing Wat Xieng Thong. Did I say that right? Sort of. And it was beautiful. And the entire area is spectacular. I want to thank everyone at Souphanouvong for hosting me here today. And I want to thank the people of Laos. I’ve been deeply touched by the hospitality you’ve shown me.

        This is my 11th visit to Asia as President of the United States, but it’s my first visit to Laos. And in fact, I’m the first United States President ever to come here. And with the kindness that you’ve shown me, I’m sure I will not be the last. Other Presidents will want to come as well. And I promise you I will come back when I’m no longer President. (Applause.) And the good thing about when I come back and I’m not President I won’t have so much security. (Laughter.) And I can sit and relax and have some food, and I won’t be so busy.

        Now, whenever I travel around the world, I spend a lot of time doing business with world leaders, and I meet with the presidents of big companies. But I try to balance spending time with young people like you. And I gave a long speech yesterday, so I’m not going to do a long speech today. I want to have a conversation with you. I want to hear what you have to say. But I’m just going to make a few remarks.

        I think you know that this part of the world means a lot to me because I lived in Indonesia as a boy. And my sister is half-Indonesian. She was born there. She married a man whose parents were from Malaysian. My mother worked in Southeast Asia most of her life, working with women in villages to try to help them get more money through selling handicrafts and developing small businesses. So as I drive around here, it’s very familiar to me. It reminds me of my childhood. And my commitment to deepening America’s ties to Southeast Asia is very real.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/09/07/remarks-president-obama-yseali-town-hall

    • President Obama’s Travel Itinerary

      Thursday, September 8th
      ———————————-

      President Obama participates in an ASEAN – EAS family photo
      National Convention Centre, Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama Holds a Press Conference
      National Convention Centre, Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama departs Laos en route to Japan
      Wattay International Airport, Vientiane, Laos

      President Obama arrives in Yokota, Japan and Air Force One refuels
      Yokota Air Base, Japan

      President Obama departs Japan en route to Alaska
      Yokota Air Base, Japan

      President Obama arrives in Achorage, Alaska and Air Force One refuels
      Ted Stevens International Airport, Anchorage, Alaska

      President Obama departs Achorage en route to Joint Base Andrews
      Ted Stevens International Airport, Anchorage, Alaska

      President Obama arrives Joint Base Andrews

      President Obama departs Joint Base Andrews en route to White House

      President Obama arrives White House

      • September 08, 2016

        Press Conference of President Obama after ASEAN Summit

        Landmark Mekong Riverside Hotel
        Vientiane, Laos

        4:23 P.M. ICT

        PRESIDENT OBAMA: Good afternoon, everybody. Once again, I want to thank the government and the people of Laos for their wonderful hospitality and for their leadership as host of the ASEAN and East Asia Summits. And I especially want to express my gratitude for the warmth and the kindness that they’ve shown to me as the first U.S. President to visit this nation. It has been a memorable and, at times, a very moving visit.

        We’re here because, as a region with more than 600 million people, several fast-growing economies, some vibrant democracies, but also countries transitioning to democracies, and given their strategic location along vital trade routes, the 10 nations of ASEAN are critical to peace and prosperity not only in the Asia Pacific but to the world. Indeed, the United States and ASEAN are among each other’s top trading partners. We’re the largest investors in this region, and ASEAN is one of our largest markets for U.S. exports, supporting hundreds of thousands of American jobs. So our trade and investment fuels jobs and prosperity across our countries.

        And that’s why, as part of my rebalance of American foreign policy to the Asia Pacific, I’ve deepened our engagement with the nations of Southeast Asia and with ASEAN as an institution. As the first U.S. President to meet with the leaders of all 10 ASEAN countries, I’ve sustained our cooperation throughout my presidency. Earlier this year, I was proud to host the first U.S.-ASEAN Summit in the United States, at Sunnylands, California. Our meeting here in Laos was our eighth meeting. And this visit marks my ninth to the ASEAN region — more than any U.S. President.

        Together, the United States and ASEAN have forged a strategic partnership guided by key principles, including that ASEAN will remain central to peace, prosperity and progress in the Asia Pacific. The United States is now firmly part of the East Asia Summit, and we have worked to make that organization the region’s leading forum for dealing with political and security challenges, including maritime security. And we’re guided by the shared vision of the region that we put forward at Sunnylands — open, dynamic and competitive economies; mutual security and the peaceful resolution of disputes; and respect for human rights — in short, a region where all nations play by the same rules. That’s a vision that we advanced here.

        For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/09/08/press-conference-president-obama-after-asean-summit

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