2016 US Presidential Election Debate @ Washington University

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Hillary Clinton vs Donald Trump
Hillary Clinton vs Donald Trump

Hillary Clinton  – US Democratic Presidential Candidate

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Donald Trump  – US Republican Presidential Candidate
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https://twitter.com/TheEconomist/status/783970835300245504

October 9, 2016 @ 9:00 PM ET
US Presidential Election Debate
Washington University
St. Louis, Missouri
Moderators: Martha Raddatz & Anderson Cooper

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Live Stream: https://www.c-span.org/video/?414227-1/presidential-nominees-debate-washington-university

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11 thoughts on “2016 US Presidential Election Debate @ Washington University

  1. WH

    Saturday, October 8, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing in Chicago, IL

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  2. 2016 flag

    October 9, 2016 @ 9:00 PM ET
    US Presidential Election Debate
    Washington University
    St. Louis, Missouri
    Moderators: Martha Raddatz & Anderson Cooper

  3. The way ahead

    America’s president writes for us about four crucial areas of unfinished business in economic policy that his successor will have to tackle

    Oct 8th 2016 Barack Obama – TheEconomist

    WHEREVER I go these days, at home or abroad, people ask me the same question: what is happening in the American political system? How has a country that has benefited—perhaps more than any other—from immigration, trade and technological innovation suddenly developed a strain of anti-immigrant, anti-innovation protectionism? Why have some on the far left and even more on the far right embraced a crude populism that promises a return to a past that is not possible to restore—and that, for most Americans, never existed at all?

    It’s true that a certain anxiety over the forces of globalisation, immigration, technology, even change itself, has taken hold in America. It’s not new, nor is it dissimilar to a discontent spreading throughout the world, often manifested in scepticism towards international institutions, trade agreements and immigration. It can be seen in Britain’s recent vote to leave the European Union and the rise of populist parties around the world.

    Much of this discontent is driven by fears that are not fundamentally economic. The anti-immigrant, anti-Mexican, anti-Muslim and anti-refugee sentiment expressed by some Americans today echoes nativist lurches of the past—the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798, the Know-Nothings of the mid-1800s, the anti-Asian sentiment in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and any number of eras in which Americans were told they could restore past glory if they just got some group or idea that was threatening America under control. We overcame those fears and we will again.

    But some of the discontent is rooted in legitimate concerns about long-term economic forces. Decades of declining productivity growth and rising inequality have resulted in slower income growth for low- and middle-income families. Globalisation and automation have weakened the position of workers and their ability to secure a decent wage. Too many potential physicists and engineers spend their careers shifting money around in the financial sector, instead of applying their talents to innovating in the real economy. And the financial crisis of 2008 only seemed to increase the isolation of corporations and elites, who often seem to live by a different set of rules to ordinary citizens.

    So it’s no wonder that so many are receptive to the argument that the game is rigged. But amid this understandable frustration, much of it fanned by politicians who would actually make the problem worse rather than better, it is important to remember that capitalism has been the greatest driver of prosperity and opportunity the world has ever known.

    For more: http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21708216-americas-president-writes-us-about-four-crucial-areas-unfinished-business-economic?fsrc=scn/tw/te/pe/ed/thewayahead

  4. Remarks of President Barack Obama
    Weekly Address
    The White House

    October 8, 2016

    Hi, everybody. Eight years ago, we were in the early stages of what would become the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes. It was a scary time. We didn’t even know where the bottom would be.

    But thanks to your hard work and determination, and some smart decisions we made, today’s a different story. We turned a recession into a record streak of job growth, creating more than 15 million new private-sector jobs and cutting the unemployment rate in half.

    Getting wages to rise again was a harder task. Even before the recession, working Americans faced decades of slow wage growth. Between 1980 and 2007, real wages barely grew each year. But because the policies we’ve put in place are working, working families are finally seeing their wages and incomes rise, too. Since 2012, wages have grown around 20 times faster than they did over the almost three decades between 1980 and 2007.

    Last year, folks’ typical household income rose by $2,800. That’s the single biggest increase on record. And across every race and age group in America, incomes rose and poverty rates fell. We lifted 3.5 million people out of poverty – the largest one-year drop in the poverty rate since 1968.

    For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/10/08/weekly-address-continuing-strengthen-middle-class

  5. WH

    Sunday, October 9, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends a campaign event for Tammy Duckworth
    Chicago, IL

    President Obama departs Chicago, IL
    Chicago O’Hare International Airport

    President Obama arrives Joint Base Andrews

    President Obama arrives The White House
    South Lawn

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  6. *******************
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    Come on over to my newest post titled: ”Earth Science Week 2016 ″

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