United States Bill of Rights – 225th Anniversary

US Bill of Rights - Pg1

The Bill of Rights is the collective name for the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution. Proposed following the often times bitter 1787–1788 battle over ratification of the Constitution, and crafted to address the objections raised by Anti-Federalists, the Bill of Rights amendments add certain safeguards of democracy—specific guarantees of personal freedoms and rights; clear limitations on the government’s power in judicial and other proceedings; and explicit declarations that all powers not specifically delegated to Congress by the Constitution are reserved for the states or the people—to the Constitution. The concepts codified in these amendments are built upon those found in several earlier documents, including the Virginia Declaration of Rights and the English Bill of Rights 1689, along with earlier documents such as Magna Carta (1215).

On June 8, 1789 Representative James Madison introduced a series of thirty-nine amendments to the constitution in the House of Representatives. Among his recommendations Madison proposed opening up the Constitution and inserting specific rights limiting the power of Congress in Article One, Section 9. Seven of these limitations would become part of the ten ratified Bill of Rights amendments. Ultimately, on September 25, 1789, Congress approved twelve articles of amendment to the Constitution and submitted them to the states for ratification.

For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Bill_of_Rights

 

 

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20 thoughts on “United States Bill of Rights – 225th Anniversary

  1. WH

    Wednesday, December 14, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    12:00 PM
    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs press

    12:30 PM
    President Obama delivers remarks at a My Brother’s Keeper summit
    South Court Auditorium

    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    3:00 PM
    3:50 PM
    President Obama and First Lady Michelle hosts an afternoon Hanukkah reception
    East Room

    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    7:35 PM
    President Obama and First Lady Michelle hosts an evening Hanukkah reception
    East Room

    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  2. US Bill of Rights – 240th Anniversary

    The Bill of Rights is the collective name for the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution. Proposed following the often times bitter 1787–1788 battle over ratification of the Constitution, and crafted to address the objections raised by Anti-Federalists, the Bill of Rights amendments add certain safeguards of democracy—specific guarantees of personal freedoms and rights; clear limitations on the government’s power in judicial and other proceedings; and explicit declarations that all powers not specifically delegated to Congress by the Constitution are reserved for the states or the people—to the Constitution. The concepts codified in these amendments are built upon those found in several earlier documents, including the Virginia Declaration of Rights and the English Bill of Rights 1689, along with earlier documents such as Magna Carta (1215).

    On June 8, 1789 Representative James Madison introduced a series of thirty-nine amendments to the constitution in the House of Representatives. Among his recommendations Madison proposed opening up the Constitution and inserting specific rights limiting the power of Congress in Article One, Section 9. Seven of these limitations would become part of the ten ratified Bill of Rights amendments. Ultimately, on September 25, 1789, Congress approved twelve articles of amendment to the Constitution and submitted them to the states for ratification.

    For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Bill_of_Rights

    • December 14, 2016

      Remarks by the President at Afternoon Hanukkah Reception

      East Room

      4:04 P.M. EST

      THE PRESIDENT: Hello, everybody! (Applause.) Hello, everybody. Welcome to the White House. Michelle and I want to be the first to wish all of you a happy Hanukkah. I figure we’ve got to be first because we’re about 10 days early. (Laughter.)

      We have some very special guests in the house to share some latkes with, so I want to call them out. We are, first of all, honored to be joined by Rabbi Steven Exler, the outstanding senior rabbi of the Hebrew Institute of Riverdale. (Applause.) He also happens to be Secretary Jack Lew’s rabbi. (Laughter.) He taught my Director of Jewish Outreach, Chanan Weissman. So he obviously is doing something right. Also, let’s give it up for Koleinu, whose sound might be the most beautiful thing to come out of Princeton since the woman standing next to me. (Applause.) That was a good one, right?

      MRS. OBAMA: That was a good one. (Laughter.)

      THE PRESIDENT: Today in the White House, as you will soon do in your homes, we recall Hanukkah’s many lessons: How a small group can make a big difference. That’s the story of the Maccabees’ unlikely military victory, and of great moral movements around the globe and across time. How a little bit can go a long way, like the small measure of oil that outlasted every expectation. It reminds us that even when our resources seem limited, our faith can help us make the most of what little we have. The small State of Israel and the relatively small Jewish population of this country have punched far above their weight in their contributions to the world. So the Festival of Lights is also a reminder of how Isaiah saw the Jewish people, as a light unto the nations.

      For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/12/14/remarks-president-afternoon-hanukkah-reception

    • December 14, 2016

      Remarks by the President at Afternoon Hanukkah Reception

      East Room

      4:04 P.M. EST

      THE PRESIDENT: Hello, everybody! (Applause.) Hello, everybody. Welcome to the White House. Michelle and I want to be the first to wish all of you a happy Hanukkah. I figure we’ve got to be first because we’re about 10 days early. (Laughter.)

      We have some very special guests in the house to share some latkes with, so I want to call them out. We are, first of all, honored to be joined by Rabbi Steven Exler, the outstanding senior rabbi of the Hebrew Institute of Riverdale. (Applause.) He also happens to be Secretary Jack Lew’s rabbi. (Laughter.) He taught my Director of Jewish Outreach, Chanan Weissman. So he obviously is doing something right. Also, let’s give it up for Koleinu, whose sound might be the most beautiful thing to come out of Princeton since the woman standing next to me. (Applause.) That was a good one, right?

      MRS. OBAMA: That was a good one. (Laughter.)

      THE PRESIDENT: Today in the White House, as you will soon do in your homes, we recall Hanukkah’s many lessons: How a small group can make a big difference. That’s the story of the Maccabees’ unlikely military victory, and of great moral movements around the globe and across time. How a little bit can go a long way, like the small measure of oil that outlasted every expectation. It reminds us that even when our resources seem limited, our faith can help us make the most of what little we have. The small State of Israel and the relatively small Jewish population of this country have punched far above their weight in their contributions to the world. So the Festival of Lights is also a reminder of how Isaiah saw the Jewish people, as a light unto the nations.

      For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/12/14/remarks-president-afternoon-hanukkah-reception

  3. WH

    Thursday, December 15, 2016

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

    7:00 AM
    8:00 AM
    9:00 AM
    10:00 AM
    11:00 AM
    11:30 AM
    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

    12:00 PM
    1:00 PM
    2:00 PM
    2:15 PM
    First Lady Michelle Obama delivers remarks at the screening of the film Hidden Figures
    White House

    3:00 PM
    4:00 PM
    5:00 PM
    6:00 PM
    7:00 PM
    8:00 PM
    9:00 PM
    10:00 PM

  4. Hidden Figures film recounts the story of the African-American mathematician Katherine Johnson and her two colleagues, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, who, while working in the segregated West Area Computers division of Langley Research Center, helped NASA catch up in the Space Race. Using their calculations, John Glenn became the first American astronaut to make a complete orbit of the Earth.

    For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hidden_Figures

    • December 15, 2016

      Remarks by the First Lady at a Screening of the Film “hidden Figures”

      South Court Auditorium

      2:31 P.M. EST

      MRS. OBAMA: My goodness! Hey, everybody. What’s going on? What have you all been doing? You’ve been hanging out a little bit? You guys, sit, sit, sit. Sit down, rest yourselves.

      AUDIENCE MEMBER: You look so good!

      MRS. OBAMA: You guys look so good, too! My goodness, what a good-looking room.

      Well, let me get started, because you all have had a pretty full day I understand — movie-watching, conversation, hanging out with A-listers in the White House. Doesn’t get much better than that, right? This makes math and science look pretty good, doesn’t it? Just remember that. Remember that feeling as you work on those problem sets and in those labs.

      But I am so proud to be a part of showing this remarkable movie, “Hidden Figures,” here at the White House. This is where it belongs, right? Because if you want to talk about hidden figures, this is the room where a lot of that did happen, for sure. And we’re so honored to have so many of the folks who were part of making this movie come to life.

      And I want to start by thanking one of those people, my introducer, Margot Lee Shetterly. Thank you so much, Margot — (applause) — for telling this extraordinary story and for being such an extraordinary woman in your own right. Thank you for being here, and congratulations.

      I also want to thank a few people who you all have been spending a little time with. We’ve got Taraji in the house. (Applause.) Taraji is so shy. (Laughter.) I keep telling her, girl, you’ve got to come out of your shell! (Laughter.) But Taraji has been all over the place just doing her thing, and we are so glad that you are here with us today. Our girl Janelle Monáe. (Applause.) This is like my little child here, my other one. Congratulations. You, too, are all over the place. I’m so proud of you.

      We have the great Octavia Spencer, who is here. (Applause.) And she’s just collecting all the stuff. (Laughter.) All the accolades and all that. We are extremely proud of you and honored to have you back here with us. We have the Kevin Costner, who my — (applause) — who is still as handsome as ever. I said that after my husband left. (Laughter.) He’s not watching.

      Mimi is here, as well, who is responsible for making this film a reality. (Applause.) And our director, Ted — Ted is in the house, as well. (Applause.) And I know that there were many, many, many more people who played a part in making this film such a tremendous statement.

      Now, as you all saw, because you guys got to see the film, “Hidden Figures” is about one of our greatest American stories: How we did what for so long had seemed impossible — we put a man into space, and then we put a man on the moon. And we did this long before we had any of the advanced technologies that we have today. In fact, the smartphones that many of you have in your pockets right now and are holding up — because that’s what you do — (laughter) — right now, they have more computing power than the technology that NASA used to send astronauts into space back then. Just imagine that. You have more power at your fingertips today than they had to do what they did.

      For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/12/15/remarks-first-lady-screening-film-hidden-figures

  5. Jobless claims drop 4,000 to 254,000

    Dec 15, 2016 8:49 a.m. ET By Jeffry Bartash – marketwatch

    WASHINGTON (MarketWatch) — The number of Americans who applied for unemployment benefits in early December fell by 4,000 to 254,000, reflecting the extremely low level of layoffs taking place in the economy.

    Economists polled by MarketWatch had forecast initial claims to total a seasonally adjusted 250,000 in the week running from Dec. 4 to Dec. 10.

    New claims usually swing up and down during the holiday season that stretches from Thanksgiving to early January. But they have been remarkably stable for months at levels last seen in the early 1970s.

    Initial claims fell under 300,000 in early 2015 and have remained below that key threshold for 93 straight weeks, the longest streak since 1970.

    For more: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/jobless-claims-drop-4000-to-254000-2016-12-15

  6. *******************
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