New Natl Monuments: Civil War Reconstruction, Birmingham, Freedom Riders & Cascade-Siskiyou

Statement by the President on Designating Monuments Honoring Civil Rights History

Today, I am designating new national monuments that preserve critical chapters of our country’s history, from the Civil War to the civil rights movement.  These monuments preserve the vibrant history of the Reconstruction Era and its role in redefining freedom. They tell the important stories of the citizens who helped launch the civil rights movement in Birmingham and the Freedom Riders whose bravery raised national awareness of segregation and violence. These stories are part of our shared history. From designating Stonewall National Monument, our country’s first national monument honoring the LGBT movement, to recognizing the movement for women’s equality through the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument, I have sought to build a more inclusive National Park System and ensure that our national parks, monuments and public lands are fully reflective of our nation’s diverse history and culture.

I am also expanding existing areas for some of our country’s treasured and historic natural resources in Oregon and California today, including stretches of California’s scenic coast and unique wildlife habitat in rugged mountain ranges and forests in Oregon and California.  Over the last 8 years, I have sought to work with local communities, Tribal governments, businesses, sportsmen, members of Congress and others to protect the most important public lands for the benefit of future generations.  Today’s actions will help ensure that more of our country’s history will be preserved and celebrated, and that more of our outdoors will be protected for all to experience and enjoy.

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Secretary Jewell Applauds President’s Designation of the National Monuments to Preserve Pivotal Civil Rights Sites and the First National Monument to Civil War Reconstruction

1/12/17 OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

Also Praises President’s Expansion of Existing National Monuments Protecting Natural & Cultural Resources in California & Oregon

WASHINGTON – As the country prepares to observe Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Park Service Acting Director Michael T. Reynolds today applauded President Barack Obama’s designation of three new national monuments to recognize the nation’s journey from the Civil War to the modern Civil Rights Movement.

The President Obama also expanded the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southwestern Oregon and the California Coastal National Monument to protect natural and cultural resources and areas of critical biodiversity, including highly important wildlife habitat.

Building on the Administration’s commitment to protecting places that are culturally and historically significant and that reflect the story of all Americans, President Obama today designated the Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument in Birmingham, Ala., the Freedom Riders National Monument in Anniston, Ala. and the Reconstruction Era National Monument in Beaufort County, S.C. to honor historic sites in both states that played an important role in American civil rights history.

“African-American history is American history and these monuments are testament to the people and places on the front-lines of our entire nation’s march toward a more perfect union,” said Secretary Jewell. “Now the National Park Service, America’s Storyteller, will forever be responsible for safeguarding the narrative of not only the sparks that ignited the Civil Rights movement but also the hope of the Reconstruction Era, which for far too long, has been neglected from our national conscience.  Current and future generations of Americans will benefit from learning about our painful past and can find inspiration to shape a brighter future.”

For more: https://www.doi.gov/pressreleases/secretary-jewell-applauds-presidents-designation-national-monuments-preserve-pivotal

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Thursday, January 12, 2017
President Obama signs a proclamation establishing The Reconstruction Era National Monument, The Freedom Riders National Monument, The Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument & The California Coastal National Monument
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#NationalMonuments

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14 thoughts on “New Natl Monuments: Civil War Reconstruction, Birmingham, Freedom Riders & Cascade-Siskiyou

  1. WH

    Friday, January 13, 2017

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    President Obama attends meetings at the White House

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    White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest briefs the press

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  2. Secretary Jewell Applauds President’s Designation of the National Monuments to Preserve Pivotal Civil Rights Sites and the First National Monument to Civil War Reconstruction

    1/12/2017 OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

    Also Praises President’s Expansion of Existing National Monuments Protecting Natural & Cultural Resources in California & Oregon

    WASHINGTON – As the country prepares to observe Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Park Service Acting Director Michael T. Reynolds today applauded President Barack Obama’s designation of three new national monuments to recognize the nation’s journey from the Civil War to the modern Civil Rights Movement.

    The President Obama also expanded the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southwestern Oregon and the California Coastal National Monument to protect natural and cultural resources and areas of critical biodiversity, including highly important wildlife habitat.

    Building on the Administration’s commitment to protecting places that are culturally and historically significant and that reflect the story of all Americans, President Obama today designated the Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument in Birmingham, Ala., the Freedom Riders National Monument in Anniston, Ala. and the Reconstruction Era National Monument in Beaufort County, S.C. to honor historic sites in both states that played an important role in American civil rights history.

    African-American history is American history and these monuments are testament to the people and places on the front-lines of our entire nation’s march toward a more perfect union,” said Secretary Jewell. “Now the National Park Service, America’s Storyteller, will forever be responsible for safeguarding the narrative of not only the sparks that ignited the Civil Rights movement but also the hope of the Reconstruction Era, which for far too long, has been neglected from our national conscience. Current and future generations of Americans will benefit from learning about our painful past and can find inspiration to shape a brighter future.”

    Acting Director of the National Park Service Michael T. Reynolds said, “These new national monuments are examples of public, private and philanthropic partnerships working toward a common goal to expand the American narrative we care for, support and share with park visitors. The cities of Birmingham and Anniston and Calhoun County in Alabama, Penn Center, Inc., the Brick Baptist Church, and private citizens in South Carolina, have donated interests in their property to the American people for inclusion in a national park unit for the benefit of all. In addition, the U.S. Navy has agreed to include historically significant portions of their lands in Port Royal, South Carolina, in the Reconstruction national monument. We look forward to working with everyone to develop the management plans for these sites, getting them open for visitors, and communicating their stories broadly.”

    For more: https://www.doi.gov/pressreleases/secretary-jewell-applauds-presidents-designation-national-monuments-preserve-pivotal

  3. Vernon F. Dahmer, SrVernon Ferdinand Dahmer, Sr. (March 10, 1908 – January 10, 1966)  was an African American Civil Rights leader and president of the Forrest County chapter of the NAACP in Hattiesburg, Mississippi.

    Early life

    Vernon Dahmer was born on March 10, 1908 in the Kelly Settlement, Forrest County, Mississippi to Ellen Louvenia (Kelly) and George Washington Dahmer. George Dahmer was a Caucasian man identified as being an honest, hardworking man with outstanding integrity. his occupation was a farmer. Ellen Kelly was biracial because of her mother, Henrietta. Henrietta was a biracial child born out of wedlock by a white slave owner, O.B Kelly, and one of his slaves. She was given to a black family, called the McCombs.

    Vernon Dahmer attended Bay Spring High School until the tenth grade; failing to graduate. Vernon was light-skinned enough to pass as a Caucasian man, but instead chose to forgo the privileges of living as a Caucasian man and faced the daily challenges of being an African American man in Mississippi during that time.

    Dahmer had three wives throughout the entirety of his life. His first wife was Winnie Laura Mott; they had ended their marriage of five years in divorce. In 1949, Dahmer had remarried to a woman named Aura Lee Smith. Unfortunately, Aura had died after a long illness. Ellie Jewel Davis was his third and final wife; she was a teacher from Rose HillMississippi, and had recently moved to Forrest County. The couple had met after working on the school board together and married in March 1952. The couple had two children of their own together to add to the six children Vernon had had with his first two wives; seven boys and one girl. The family and their home was located north of Forrest County and was part of the Kelly Settlement, close to the Jones County boarder; the settlement (named for Dahmer’s maternal grandfather). Ellie Dahmer taught for many years in Richton, Mississippi and retired in 1987 from the Forrest County school system.

    Dahmer was a member of Shady Grove Baptist Church where he served as a music director and Sunday School teacher. Dahmer was the owner of a grocery store, sawmill, planing mill, and also cotton farm. Dahmer’s main objective was to make a living for himself and to provide work for somebody else. Vernon would hire local individuals from the community to work for him and did not discriminate between black or white.

    Civil Rights Movement

    During the Civil Rights Movement Vernon served two terms as president of the Forrest County Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and led voter registration drives in the 1960s. His wife Ellie said “He was a good progressive Christian man. He wasn’t a mean, bitter Civil Rights worker, because he saw good in White as well as he did in Black.” As president of the Forrest County Chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Vernon had personally asked the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) to send workers to help aid the voter registrations efforts being made by African Americans in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. SNCC had sent two workers, Curtis Hayes and Hollis Watkins, to Hattiesburg. The act of calling SNCC to help aid the efforts made by the NAACP would eventually cost Vernon his NAACP presidency.

    in 1949 Dahmer was in the process of making out his new registration card when Luther Cox denied his attempts to re-register. Luther Cox was the authority figure in charge of registered voters in Forrest County and was a white segregationist. Cox would only authorize a registration of an African American if they could answer the question “How many bubbles are in a bar of soap?” In 1950, fifteen leaders of the Forrest County‘s black community, including Dahmer, filled a lawsuit against Cox for his administration of the voting laws; preliminary injunction. Twelve years late in March 1962, the preliminary injunction was in motion of being viewed by the court of law. Dahmer had testified in court against Luther Cox and his testimony helped demonstrate the pattern of discrimination in the county.

    In the 1950s Vernon Dahmer and Medgar Evers founded a youth National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) chapter in Hattiesburg. Unfortunately the student chapter did not last longer than a year. Dahmer continued to be supportive of the Student Nonviolence Coordinating Committee (SNCC) throughout the Civil Rights Movement. Vernon’s farm quickly became a home away from home for SNCC volunteers. The farm was also used for registration projects and helped employee the committee volunteers. Dahmer was also working closely with Coalition for Free and Open Election, COFO and the Delta Ministry.

    Dahmer kept a voter registration book in his grocery store in late 1965 to make it easier for African Americans to register. Dahmer also made a public service announcement over the radio stating that he would helped the local African American population pay a poll tax for the right to vote if they could not afford to do so themselves. His mantra was, “If you don’t vote, you don’t count,” and those words, which he repeated on his deathbed, were used as his epitaph.

    For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vernon_Dahmer

    • What One Family Sacrificed To Help Black People Vote In 1966

      January 13, 20175:02 AM ET NPR STAFF

      Vernon Dahmer was a civil rights leader in the mid-1960s, when Mississippians were still required to pay a poll tax in order to register to vote. In January 1966, the successful farmer and businessman publicly offered to pay that tax for black people who couldn’t afford it.

      That night his house was firebombed by the Ku Klux Klan. His wife and three of his children were at home.

      “We didn’t think anybody would bother the children, but we were wrong, they intended to get all of us January the 10th, 1966,” Vernon’s widow, Ellie Dahmer, told their daughter Bettie during a recent visit to StoryCorps.

      “That night, when I waked up, the house was on fire, and it was so bright and so hot. You was screaming to the top of your voice, ‘Lord have mercy. We’re going to get burned up in this house alive.’ I raised the windows up, and then your father was handing you out the window to me.”

      They escaped to the barn to hide, sitting on bales of hay.

      “I had burns over a good portion of my body, and I was screaming and crying because I was in pain,” recalled Bettie, who was 10 at the time. “Daddy was burned so much worse than I was — when he held up his arm the skin just hung down — but Daddy never did complain, he was just concerned about me. I remember us going to the hospital.”

      Vernon and Bettie shared a hospital room, with Ellie sitting between the two beds.

      “And he yelled my name real loud, and then he was gone,” she said. “He knew that he might get killed, and he was willing to take the risk, but it was not worth it to me. I miss him so much.”

      Bettie, who is now 61, looks at the situation differently.

      “Daddy wasn’t a man that wore a suit, he wore overalls. In Daddy’s world everybody had a job to do,” she said. “Black people couldn’t vote, so I do understand why he did what he did. It meant a lot to him.”

      For the entire article and audio interview: http://www.npr.org/2017/01/13/509495656/what-one-family-sacrificed-to-help-black-people-vote-in-1966

  4. January 13, 2017

    Presidential Proclamation — Religious Freedom Day, 2017

    RELIGIOUS FREEDOM DAY, 2017

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    BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

    A PROCLAMATION

    Believing that “Almighty God hath created the mind free,” Thomas Jefferson authored the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom after our young Nation declared its independence. This idea of religious liberty later became a foundation for the First Amendment, which begins by stating that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof…” On Religious Freedom Day, we rededicate ourselves to defending these fundamental principles, pay tribute to the many ways women and men of different religious and non-religious backgrounds have shaped America’s narrative, and resolve to continue forging a future in which all people are able to practice their faiths freely or not practice at all.

    Religious freedom is a principle based not on shared ancestry, culture, ethnicity, or faith but on a shared commitment to liberty — and it lies at the very heart of who we are as Americans

    For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/01/13/presidential-proclamation-religious-freedom-day-2017

  5. WH

    Saturday, January 14, 2017

    All Times Eastern

    President Obama receives the presidential daily briefing

    Vice President Joe Biden departs for Ukraine

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  6. https://twitter.com/hashtag/OurFirstStand?src=hash

    Health Care Day of Action

    Sanders, Dem leaders urge day of rallies to ‘save health care

    12/28/16 12:41 PM EST BY PETER SULLIVAN – TheHill

    Sanders, Dem leaders urge day of rallies to ‘save health care’

    Democratic leaders are calling for rallies across the country to fight Republican efforts to overhaul Medicare and repeal ObamaCare.

    The Democratic leaders, Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), as well as Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), wrote a letter to colleagues Wednesday calling for a “day of action” on Jan. 15.

    “Rallies will be held across the country to vigorously oppose the Republican plan to end Medicare as we know it and throw our health care system into chaos,” the letter states.

    The leaders dubbed the effort, “Our First Stand: Save Health Care.”

    The Democrats are warning against Republican plans to repeal ObamaCare, pointing to a study from the Urban Institute that found about 30 million people would lose health insurance once repeal goes into effect.

    They also point to plans to implement a Medicare “premium support” system that would change the program from an open-ended government commitment to a system where seniors receive a set amount of money to help them purchase coverage.

    Republicans like Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) say such a change is necessary to put the program on sound financial footing; Democrats say it would end the program “as we know it.”

    For more: http://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/312000-sanders-dem-leaders-urge-day-of-rallies-to-save-health-care

  7. January 13, 2017

    Weekly Address: The Honor of Serving You as President

    Remarks of President Barack Obama as Delivered
    Weekly Address
    The White House

    This week, I traveled to Chicago to deliver my final farewell address to the nation, following in the tradition of Presidents before me. It was an opportunity to say thank you. Whether we’ve seen eye-to-eye or rarely agreed at all, my conversations with you, the American people – in living rooms and schools; at farms and on factory floors; at diners and on distant military outposts – are what have kept me honest, kept me inspired, and kept me going. Every day, I learned from you. You made me a better President, and you made me a better man.

    Over the course of these eight years, I have seen the goodness, the resilience, and the hope of the American people. I’ve seen neighbors looking out for each other as we rescued our economy from the worst crisis of our lifetimes. I’ve hugged cancer survivors who finally know the security of affordable health care. I’ve seen communities like Joplin rebuild from disaster, and cities like Boston show the world that no terrorist will ever break the American spirit.

    I’ve seen the hopeful faces of young graduates and our newest military officers. I’ve mourned with grieving families searching for answers, and found grace in a Charleston church. I’ve seen our scientists help a paralyzed man regain his sense of touch, and our wounded warriors walk again. I’ve seen our doctors and volunteers rebuild after earthquakes and stop pandemics in their tracks. I’ve learned from students who are building robots and curing diseases and who will change the world in ways we can’t even imagine. I’ve seen the youngest of children remind us of our obligations to care for our refugees, to work in peace, and above all to look out for each other.

    That’s what’s possible when we come together in the hard, slow, sometimes frustrating, but always vital work of self-government. But we can’t take our democracy for granted. All of us, regardless of party, should throw ourselves into the work of citizenship. Not just when there’s an election, not just when our own narrow interest is at stake, but over the full span of a lifetime. If you’re tired of arguing with strangers on the internet, try to talk with one in real life. If something needs fixing, lace up your shoes and do some organizing. If you’re disappointed by your elected officials, then grab a clipboard, get some signatures, and run for office yourself.

    Our success depends on our participation, regardless of which way the pendulum of power swings. It falls on each of us to be guardians of our democracy; to embrace the joyous task we’ve been given to continually try to improve this great nation of ours. Because for all our outward differences, we all share the same proud title: Citizen.

    For more: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/01/14/weekly-address-honor-serving-you-president

  8. *******************
    THIS POST IS NOW CLOSED NBLB

    Come on over to my newest post titled: ” Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day 2017″

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