Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day 2017

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is a United States federal holiday marking the birthday of Rev. Dr.Martin Luther King, Jr.  King was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism in the civil rights movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law.

The national Martin Luther King Day of Service was started by former Pennsylvania U.S. Senator Harris Wofford and Atlanta Congressman John Lewis, who co-authored the King Holiday and Service Act. The federal legislation challenges Americans to transform the King Holiday into a day of citizen action volunteer service in honor of Dr. King. The federal legislation was signed into law by President Bill Clinton on August 23, 1994. Since 1996, the annual Greater Philadelphia King Day of Service.  has been the largest event in the nation honoring Dr. King. In honor of MLK, volunteers across the country donate their time to make a difference on this day.

Explore the mlkday.gov site to learn more about MLK Day and how you can participate.

1/13/17 Presidential Proclamation — Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2017

 

MLK Day Twitter
MLK Day Facebook
MLK Day Instagram
MLK Day Snapchat

.

#MLKDay


New Natl Monuments: Civil War Reconstruction, Birmingham, Freedom Riders & Cascade-Siskiyou

Statement by the President on Designating Monuments Honoring Civil Rights History

Today, I am designating new national monuments that preserve critical chapters of our country’s history, from the Civil War to the civil rights movement.  These monuments preserve the vibrant history of the Reconstruction Era and its role in redefining freedom. They tell the important stories of the citizens who helped launch the civil rights movement in Birmingham and the Freedom Riders whose bravery raised national awareness of segregation and violence. These stories are part of our shared history. From designating Stonewall National Monument, our country’s first national monument honoring the LGBT movement, to recognizing the movement for women’s equality through the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument, I have sought to build a more inclusive National Park System and ensure that our national parks, monuments and public lands are fully reflective of our nation’s diverse history and culture.

I am also expanding existing areas for some of our country’s treasured and historic natural resources in Oregon and California today, including stretches of California’s scenic coast and unique wildlife habitat in rugged mountain ranges and forests in Oregon and California.  Over the last 8 years, I have sought to work with local communities, Tribal governments, businesses, sportsmen, members of Congress and others to protect the most important public lands for the benefit of future generations.  Today’s actions will help ensure that more of our country’s history will be preserved and celebrated, and that more of our outdoors will be protected for all to experience and enjoy.

.

Secretary Jewell Applauds President’s Designation of the National Monuments to Preserve Pivotal Civil Rights Sites and the First National Monument to Civil War Reconstruction

1/12/17 OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

Also Praises President’s Expansion of Existing National Monuments Protecting Natural & Cultural Resources in California & Oregon

WASHINGTON – As the country prepares to observe Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Park Service Acting Director Michael T. Reynolds today applauded President Barack Obama’s designation of three new national monuments to recognize the nation’s journey from the Civil War to the modern Civil Rights Movement.

The President Obama also expanded the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southwestern Oregon and the California Coastal National Monument to protect natural and cultural resources and areas of critical biodiversity, including highly important wildlife habitat.

Building on the Administration’s commitment to protecting places that are culturally and historically significant and that reflect the story of all Americans, President Obama today designated the Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument in Birmingham, Ala., the Freedom Riders National Monument in Anniston, Ala. and the Reconstruction Era National Monument in Beaufort County, S.C. to honor historic sites in both states that played an important role in American civil rights history.

“African-American history is American history and these monuments are testament to the people and places on the front-lines of our entire nation’s march toward a more perfect union,” said Secretary Jewell. “Now the National Park Service, America’s Storyteller, will forever be responsible for safeguarding the narrative of not only the sparks that ignited the Civil Rights movement but also the hope of the Reconstruction Era, which for far too long, has been neglected from our national conscience.  Current and future generations of Americans will benefit from learning about our painful past and can find inspiration to shape a brighter future.”

For more: https://www.doi.gov/pressreleases/secretary-jewell-applauds-presidents-designation-national-monuments-preserve-pivotal

.

.

Thursday, January 12, 2017
President Obama signs a proclamation establishing The Reconstruction Era National Monument, The Freedom Riders National Monument, The Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument & The California Coastal National Monument
.

#NationalMonuments

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Designation of 24 New National Historic Landmarks

Interior Department Announces 24 New National Historic Landmarks

1/11/17 OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

Designations recognize places that depict a broad range of America’s rich, complex history

WASHINGTON – As the National Park Service enters its second century of service and strives to tell a more inclusive and diverse story of America’s history, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced the designation of 24 new National Historic Landmarks.

The National Historic Landmarks Program recognizes historic properties of exceptional value to the nation and promotes the preservation efforts of federal, state, and local agencies and Native American tribes, as well as those of private organizations and individuals. The program is one of more than a dozen administered by the National Park Service that provide states and local communities technical assistance, recognition and funding to help preserve our nation’s shared history and create close-to-home recreation opportunities.

“These 24 new designations depict different threads of the American story that have been told through activism, architecture, music, and religious observance,” said Secretary Jewell. “Their designation ensures future generations have the ability to learn from the past as we preserve and protect the historic value of these properties and the more than 2,500 other landmarks nationwide.”

If not already so recognized, properties designated as National Historic Landmarks are listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

“As the National Park Service kicks off its second century of stewardship of America’s natural and historic treasures, we look forward to connecting new generations of Americans to the places and stories recognized as National Historic Landmarks today,” said National Park Service Acting Director Michael T. Reynolds.

The 24 national historic landmarks announced today are:

For more: https://www.doi.gov/pressreleases/interior-department-announces-24-new-national-historic-landmarks

National Historic Landmarks Program

 

National Historic Landmarks (NHLs) are historic properties that illustrate the heritage of the United States. Today, just over 2,500 historic places bear this national distinction. NHLs come in many forms: historic buildings, sites, structures, objects, and districts. Each NHL represents an outstanding aspect of American history and culture. The program was formally inaugurated with a series of listings on October 9, 1960.

What are National Historic Landmarks?

National Historic Landmarks (NHLs) are historic places that possess exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United States.  The National Park Service’s National Historic Landmarks Program oversees the designation of such sites.  There are just over 2,500 National Historic Landmarks.  All NHLs are also listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

NHLs come in many forms: buildings, sites, structures, objects, and districts.  A historic site may be important enough to receive designation as an NHL if it:

  • is the location with the strongest association with a turning point or significant event in American history.
  • is the best location to tell the story of an individual who played a significant role in the history of the United States.
  • is an exceptional representation of a particular building or engineering method, technique, or building type in the country.
  • provides the potential to yield new and innovative information about the past through archeology.

Most NHLs are owned by private individuals, universities, non-profit organizations, corporations, tribal entities, or local and state governments.  The Federal government owns fewer than 400 NHLs (16%).  The laws that govern property rights still apply to designated Landmarks.  Designation of a property as a National Historic Landmark does not give ownership of the property to the Federal government or the National Park Service.

For more: http://www.nps.gov/nhl/

..

Learn about:

..
.

#NationalMonuments

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Obama’s Legacy: His Army Of Campaign Volunteers Continues To Serve

 

respect-empower-include

South County 4 Obama
South County 4 Obama

stand-for-hope

 

Obama’s Legacy: His Army Of Campaign Volunteers Continues To Serve

January 5, 20174:34 AM ET Scott Horsley – NPR

On a cold night in January nine years ago, Barack Obama won the Iowa caucuses. That first big step on the young senator’s unlikely path to the White House was fueled by an army of campaign volunteers, which Obama later called one of his proudest legacies.

“That’s what America needs right now,” Obama told campaign workers a year later, after he was sworn in as president. “Active citizens like you, who are willing to turn towards each other, talk to people you’ve never met, and say, ‘C’mon, let’s go do this. Let’s go change the world.’ ”

There was nothing glamorous about the work those volunteers did for Obama: A lot of knocking on doors and making phone calls. But for many veterans of that first Obama campaign, it’s a time they’ll never forget.

“I’ll be friends with some of those people forever,” says Nathan Blake, who quit his job at a Des Moines law firm to work for the upstart campaign. “We’ve got that shared experience that was super-meaningful and historic and important, and good for our country.”

It wasn’t obvious at the time that the man they were knocking on doors for eventually would make his way to the White House, but even in those early days, Blake was a “true believer.”

He had plenty of company.

Brian Kirschling, who works at a Veterans Affairs hospital in Iowa City, was older than a lot of Obama campaign volunteers, and he’d never been politically active. But by 2007, Kirschling had decided it was time to roll up his sleeves — a decision he explains by quoting Dr. Seuss.

“His quote from The Lorax is, ‘Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, noting is going to get better. It’s not,'” Kirschling says.

Kirschling became a “precinct captain” for Obama. Children’s books and a Disney video were key parts of his caucus night toolkit for attracting parents with young children.

“In the Iowa caucus,” he says, “it’s about how many people are standing in your corner. I can tell you everybody in that room that had kids was in our corner.”

Aletheia Henry was just out of graduate school in 2007 when she heard a story on the radio about a training camp Obama was running for campaign volunteers. She packed her car and drove from Ohio to Chicago, listening to a tape of Obama’s book, The Audacity of Hope, along the way.

“By the time I got there I was really hooked,” Henry says.

She wound up working as a field organizer for Obama in eight different states.

“I would show up in a city and not know anyone,” Henry recalls. But she’d be given the name of someone who’d volunteered to let her sleep on their couch. “And they’d have me over and have dinner and talk a little and they’d let me stay there for weeks or months at a time and we’d work together on this democracy.”

After Obama was elected, campaign workers went their separate ways. Nathan Blake spent time in Washington, working for the Agriculture Department. He’s now back in Iowa, doing consumer protection work for the attorney general.

Brian Kirschling, who’d never done much before in politics, decided to run for his local school board. And in a crowded field of nine candidates he made a point of knocking on doors all over the city.

“Which is exactly what I remembered learning with the Obama campaign,” Kirschling says. “It was uncomfortable at times to go into parts of the district that don’t necessarily agree with my opinion. But it allowed me the opportunity to stand on doorsteps or sometimes come into their house and have those conversations.”

Aletheia Henry went on to run Obama’s successful reelection campaign in Pennsylvania. In 2016, she was an adviser to Hillary Clinton’s campaign there, which was not so successful.

“I think these next few years are going to take a lot of conversation,” Henry says, recalling the motto of Obama’s 2008 campaign: “Respect, Empower, Include.”

For the entire article and audio interview: http://www.npr.org/2017/01/05/507927467/obamas-legacy-his-army-of-campaign-volunteers-continues-to-serve

YesWeCanPOTUSflag- thumbnail

By ☮ CR of  OFA

#AlwaysWillBeMyPresident

#ThePeoplesPresident

#IStandWithPresObama

#FiredUpReadyToGo

#PresidentObama

#ThankYouObama

#ThankObama

#ProudOfObama

#ILoveObama

#YesWeCan

#Obama

#OFA

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Congressional Black Congress – 46th Anniversary

1977, 15 of the Congressional Black Caucus members L -R (front row) B Jordan of TX, R Nix, Sr., of PA, R Metcalfe of IL, C Collins of IL P Mitchell of MD, G Hawkins of CA, S Chisholm of NY; (middle row) J Conyers, Jr., of MI, C Rangel of NY, H Ford, Sr., of TN, Y Brathwaite Burke of CA, W Fauntroy of the DC; (back row) R Dellums of CA, L Stokes of OH, and C C. Diggs, Jr., of MI
1977, 15 of the Congressional Black Caucus members
L -R (front row) B Jordan of TX, R Nix, Sr., of PA, R Metcalfe of IL, C Collins of IL P Mitchell of MD, G Hawkins of CA, S Chisholm of NY; (middle row) J Conyers, Jr., of MI, C Rangel of NY, H Ford, Sr., of TN, Y Brathwaite Burke of CA, W Fauntroy of the DC; (back row) R Dellums of CA, L Stokes of OH, and C C. Diggs, Jr., of MI

.As the number of African Americans serving in Congress grew, a long-desired movement to form a more unified organization among black legislators coalesced. When Charles C. Diggs, Jr., of Michigan entered the House of Representatives in 1955, he joined black Members William Dawson of Illinois and Adam Clayton Powell—the largest delegation of African Americans on Capitol Hill since Reconstruction. “In Congress, there was little, if any communication between Dawson and Powell,” Diggs noted. “Their styles were different. In terms of exercise between them, there was not any.” Diggs keenly felt the isolation endured by black Members due to their small numbers in Congress and, in some cases, an inability to connect on a personal level. Frustrated that black Representatives lacked a forum to discuss common concerns and issues, Diggs proposed the organization of the Democratic Select Committee (DSC) at the opening of the 91st Congress (1969–1971), maintaining that the DSC would fill a significant void by fostering the exchange of information among the nine African Americans serving in Congress, as well as between black Representatives and House leadership. “The sooner we get organized for group action, the more effective we can become,” Diggs remarked.  The informal group held sporadic meetings that were mainly social gatherings and had no independent staff or budget.

Newly elected Members and beneficiaries of court-ordered redistricting, William (Bill) Clay, Sr., of Missouri, Louis Stokes of Ohio, and Shirley Chisholm embraced the concept of a group for black legislators to “seize the moment, to fight for justice, to raise issues too long ignored and too little debated”—all of which quickly translated into a more influential association for African-American Members.

For more:  http://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/BAIC/Historical-Essays/Permanent-Interest/Congressional-Black-Caucus/

.

Congressional Black Congress

Since its establishment in 1971, Members of the Congressional Black Caucus have joined together to empower America’s neglected citizens and to address their legislative concerns.For more than 40 years, the CBC has consistently been the voice for people of color and vulnerable communities in Congress and has been committed to utilizing the full Constitutional power, statutory authority, and financial resources of the Government of the United States of America to ensure that everyone in the United States has an opportunity to achieve their version of the American Dream.

The legislative agenda of universal empowerment that Members of the Congressional Black Caucus collectively pursue include but are not limited to: the creation of universal access to a world-class education from birth through post secondary level; the creation of universal access to quality, affordable health care and the elimination of racially based health disparities; the creation of universal access to modern technology, capital and full, fairly-compensated employment; the creation and or expansion of U.S. foreign policy initiatives that will contribute to the survival, health, education and general welfare of all peoples of the world in a manner consistent with universal human dignity, tolerance and respect and such other legislative action as a majority of the entire CBC Membership may support.

For more: http://cbc.fudge.house.gov

.

Congressional Black Congress Twitter
Congressional Black Congress Facebook
Congressional Black Congress YouTube

.

#CongressionalBlackCaucus

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Harry T. Moore, Pres. of FL NAACP Killing – 65th Anniversary

Harry Tyson Moore (November 18, 1905 – December 25, 1951) was an African-American educator, a pioneer leader of the Civil Rights Movement, and founder of the first branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in Brevard County, Florida.

Harry T. Moore and his wife, Harriette Vyda Simms Moore, also an educator, were the victims of a bombing of their home in Mims, Florida on Christmas night 1951. He died in an ambulance on the way to a hospital in Seminole County while she died January 3, 1952 at the hospital in Sanford, Florida. Forensic work in 2005-6 resulted in the naming of the probable perpetrators as four Ku Klux Klan members, all long dead by the time of the investigation. The Moores were the first NAACP members to be murdered for civil rights activism; Moore has been called the first martyr of the early stage of the Civil Rights Movement.

For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_T._Moore#Murder

Civil Rights Martyrs

.

#NAACPBombing

#CivilRights

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Resistance Against the Trump Agenda

 

How Liberals Can Use the Tea Party Playbook to Stop Trump

An interview with one of the authors of “A Practical Guide for Resisting the Trump Agenda.”

Since the election, progressives have been huddling on social media to plan ways to stymie, if not stop, President-elect Donald Trump. Last week, new inspiration came in the form of a link leading to a 23-page Google document titled “Indivisible: A Practical Guide for Resisting the Trump Agenda.” In clear, confident prose, it lays out a well-reasoned, step-by-step strategy for building a grassroots movement to challenge Trump and his Republican allies in Congress. And it openly acknowledges that its playbook is cribbed from a surprising source: the tea party.

The guide was put together as a side project of a largely anonymous group of former Democratic congressional staffers who sought to help fellow progressives do something more constructive than signing online petitions. “Hill staffers don’t have a lot of skills—that’s why so many become lobbyists,” explains 31-year-old Ezra Levin, the collaboration’s unofficial spokesman, whose day job is at an anti-poverty think tank. “The one thing that we have is knowledge of how Congress works.”

Some of that knowledge was earned the hard way. “We know what worked when we were in Congress. We saw the tea party adopt a very effective strategy that effectively slowed down Congress and defeated many progressive priorities,” says Levin, who previously worked as deputy policy director for Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-Texas). “Indivisible” explains how the tea party did it, and how progressives can do the same—without the vitriol. (“The Tea Party’s ideas were wrong and their behavior was often horrible,” it states. “We are better than this.”) The guide explains how to effectively pressure lawmakers—exploiting their political self-interest to get them to do the right thing—or at least not do the wrong thing.

Since it was published, the guide has been read thousands of times. (Exactly how many isn’t clear; Google doesn’t track how many people view public documents. You can now download it here.) It’s been shared by liberal celebrities such as former Labor Secretary Robert Reich and Star Trek‘s George Takei. “There have been some high-profile folks—it’s nice to see that,” Levin says. “But I think that’s less important and heartwarming than the people in rural districts in California or Georgia or Florida saying, ‘Oh my gosh this is exactly what I’ve been looking for.'”

For more: http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2016/12/progressives-tea-party-tactics-stop-trump

.

Stop Trump Movement

Protests against Donald Trump

Planned demonstrations and boycotts of Inauguration of Donald Trump

.

#IlegitimatePresident

#NeverMyPresident

#NotMyPresident

#WomensMarchOnWashington

#WomensMarch

#LoveConquersHate

#ProudLiberal

#staystrong

Obama_Biden_thumbnail