Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day 2017

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day is a United States federal holiday marking the birthday of Rev. Dr.Martin Luther King, Jr.  King was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism in the civil rights movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law.

The national Martin Luther King Day of Service was started by former Pennsylvania U.S. Senator Harris Wofford and Atlanta Congressman John Lewis, who co-authored the King Holiday and Service Act. The federal legislation challenges Americans to transform the King Holiday into a day of citizen action volunteer service in honor of Dr. King. The federal legislation was signed into law by President Bill Clinton on August 23, 1994. Since 1996, the annual Greater Philadelphia King Day of Service.  has been the largest event in the nation honoring Dr. King. In honor of MLK, volunteers across the country donate their time to make a difference on this day.

Explore the mlkday.gov site to learn more about MLK Day and how you can participate.

1/13/17 Presidential Proclamation — Martin Luther King, Jr., Federal Holiday, 2017

 

MLK Day Twitter
MLK Day Facebook
MLK Day Instagram
MLK Day Snapchat

.

#MLKDay


New Natl Monuments: Civil War Reconstruction, Birmingham, Freedom Riders & Cascade-Siskiyou

Statement by the President on Designating Monuments Honoring Civil Rights History

Today, I am designating new national monuments that preserve critical chapters of our country’s history, from the Civil War to the civil rights movement.  These monuments preserve the vibrant history of the Reconstruction Era and its role in redefining freedom. They tell the important stories of the citizens who helped launch the civil rights movement in Birmingham and the Freedom Riders whose bravery raised national awareness of segregation and violence. These stories are part of our shared history. From designating Stonewall National Monument, our country’s first national monument honoring the LGBT movement, to recognizing the movement for women’s equality through the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument, I have sought to build a more inclusive National Park System and ensure that our national parks, monuments and public lands are fully reflective of our nation’s diverse history and culture.

I am also expanding existing areas for some of our country’s treasured and historic natural resources in Oregon and California today, including stretches of California’s scenic coast and unique wildlife habitat in rugged mountain ranges and forests in Oregon and California.  Over the last 8 years, I have sought to work with local communities, Tribal governments, businesses, sportsmen, members of Congress and others to protect the most important public lands for the benefit of future generations.  Today’s actions will help ensure that more of our country’s history will be preserved and celebrated, and that more of our outdoors will be protected for all to experience and enjoy.

.

Secretary Jewell Applauds President’s Designation of the National Monuments to Preserve Pivotal Civil Rights Sites and the First National Monument to Civil War Reconstruction

1/12/17 OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

Also Praises President’s Expansion of Existing National Monuments Protecting Natural & Cultural Resources in California & Oregon

WASHINGTON – As the country prepares to observe Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell and National Park Service Acting Director Michael T. Reynolds today applauded President Barack Obama’s designation of three new national monuments to recognize the nation’s journey from the Civil War to the modern Civil Rights Movement.

The President Obama also expanded the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in southwestern Oregon and the California Coastal National Monument to protect natural and cultural resources and areas of critical biodiversity, including highly important wildlife habitat.

Building on the Administration’s commitment to protecting places that are culturally and historically significant and that reflect the story of all Americans, President Obama today designated the Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument in Birmingham, Ala., the Freedom Riders National Monument in Anniston, Ala. and the Reconstruction Era National Monument in Beaufort County, S.C. to honor historic sites in both states that played an important role in American civil rights history.

“African-American history is American history and these monuments are testament to the people and places on the front-lines of our entire nation’s march toward a more perfect union,” said Secretary Jewell. “Now the National Park Service, America’s Storyteller, will forever be responsible for safeguarding the narrative of not only the sparks that ignited the Civil Rights movement but also the hope of the Reconstruction Era, which for far too long, has been neglected from our national conscience.  Current and future generations of Americans will benefit from learning about our painful past and can find inspiration to shape a brighter future.”

For more: https://www.doi.gov/pressreleases/secretary-jewell-applauds-presidents-designation-national-monuments-preserve-pivotal

.

.

Thursday, January 12, 2017
President Obama signs a proclamation establishing The Reconstruction Era National Monument, The Freedom Riders National Monument, The Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument & The California Coastal National Monument
.

#NationalMonuments

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Designation of 24 New National Historic Landmarks

Interior Department Announces 24 New National Historic Landmarks

1/11/17 OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY

Designations recognize places that depict a broad range of America’s rich, complex history

WASHINGTON – As the National Park Service enters its second century of service and strives to tell a more inclusive and diverse story of America’s history, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced the designation of 24 new National Historic Landmarks.

The National Historic Landmarks Program recognizes historic properties of exceptional value to the nation and promotes the preservation efforts of federal, state, and local agencies and Native American tribes, as well as those of private organizations and individuals. The program is one of more than a dozen administered by the National Park Service that provide states and local communities technical assistance, recognition and funding to help preserve our nation’s shared history and create close-to-home recreation opportunities.

“These 24 new designations depict different threads of the American story that have been told through activism, architecture, music, and religious observance,” said Secretary Jewell. “Their designation ensures future generations have the ability to learn from the past as we preserve and protect the historic value of these properties and the more than 2,500 other landmarks nationwide.”

If not already so recognized, properties designated as National Historic Landmarks are listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

“As the National Park Service kicks off its second century of stewardship of America’s natural and historic treasures, we look forward to connecting new generations of Americans to the places and stories recognized as National Historic Landmarks today,” said National Park Service Acting Director Michael T. Reynolds.

The 24 national historic landmarks announced today are:

For more: https://www.doi.gov/pressreleases/interior-department-announces-24-new-national-historic-landmarks

National Historic Landmarks Program

 

National Historic Landmarks (NHLs) are historic properties that illustrate the heritage of the United States. Today, just over 2,500 historic places bear this national distinction. NHLs come in many forms: historic buildings, sites, structures, objects, and districts. Each NHL represents an outstanding aspect of American history and culture. The program was formally inaugurated with a series of listings on October 9, 1960.

What are National Historic Landmarks?

National Historic Landmarks (NHLs) are historic places that possess exceptional value in commemorating or illustrating the history of the United States.  The National Park Service’s National Historic Landmarks Program oversees the designation of such sites.  There are just over 2,500 National Historic Landmarks.  All NHLs are also listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

NHLs come in many forms: buildings, sites, structures, objects, and districts.  A historic site may be important enough to receive designation as an NHL if it:

  • is the location with the strongest association with a turning point or significant event in American history.
  • is the best location to tell the story of an individual who played a significant role in the history of the United States.
  • is an exceptional representation of a particular building or engineering method, technique, or building type in the country.
  • provides the potential to yield new and innovative information about the past through archeology.

Most NHLs are owned by private individuals, universities, non-profit organizations, corporations, tribal entities, or local and state governments.  The Federal government owns fewer than 400 NHLs (16%).  The laws that govern property rights still apply to designated Landmarks.  Designation of a property as a National Historic Landmark does not give ownership of the property to the Federal government or the National Park Service.

For more: http://www.nps.gov/nhl/

..

Learn about:

..
.

#NationalMonuments

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Obama’s Legacy: His Army Of Campaign Volunteers Continues To Serve

 

respect-empower-include

South County 4 Obama
South County 4 Obama

stand-for-hope

 

Obama’s Legacy: His Army Of Campaign Volunteers Continues To Serve

January 5, 20174:34 AM ET Scott Horsley – NPR

On a cold night in January nine years ago, Barack Obama won the Iowa caucuses. That first big step on the young senator’s unlikely path to the White House was fueled by an army of campaign volunteers, which Obama later called one of his proudest legacies.

“That’s what America needs right now,” Obama told campaign workers a year later, after he was sworn in as president. “Active citizens like you, who are willing to turn towards each other, talk to people you’ve never met, and say, ‘C’mon, let’s go do this. Let’s go change the world.’ ”

There was nothing glamorous about the work those volunteers did for Obama: A lot of knocking on doors and making phone calls. But for many veterans of that first Obama campaign, it’s a time they’ll never forget.

“I’ll be friends with some of those people forever,” says Nathan Blake, who quit his job at a Des Moines law firm to work for the upstart campaign. “We’ve got that shared experience that was super-meaningful and historic and important, and good for our country.”

It wasn’t obvious at the time that the man they were knocking on doors for eventually would make his way to the White House, but even in those early days, Blake was a “true believer.”

He had plenty of company.

Brian Kirschling, who works at a Veterans Affairs hospital in Iowa City, was older than a lot of Obama campaign volunteers, and he’d never been politically active. But by 2007, Kirschling had decided it was time to roll up his sleeves — a decision he explains by quoting Dr. Seuss.

“His quote from The Lorax is, ‘Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, noting is going to get better. It’s not,'” Kirschling says.

Kirschling became a “precinct captain” for Obama. Children’s books and a Disney video were key parts of his caucus night toolkit for attracting parents with young children.

“In the Iowa caucus,” he says, “it’s about how many people are standing in your corner. I can tell you everybody in that room that had kids was in our corner.”

Aletheia Henry was just out of graduate school in 2007 when she heard a story on the radio about a training camp Obama was running for campaign volunteers. She packed her car and drove from Ohio to Chicago, listening to a tape of Obama’s book, The Audacity of Hope, along the way.

“By the time I got there I was really hooked,” Henry says.

She wound up working as a field organizer for Obama in eight different states.

“I would show up in a city and not know anyone,” Henry recalls. But she’d be given the name of someone who’d volunteered to let her sleep on their couch. “And they’d have me over and have dinner and talk a little and they’d let me stay there for weeks or months at a time and we’d work together on this democracy.”

After Obama was elected, campaign workers went their separate ways. Nathan Blake spent time in Washington, working for the Agriculture Department. He’s now back in Iowa, doing consumer protection work for the attorney general.

Brian Kirschling, who’d never done much before in politics, decided to run for his local school board. And in a crowded field of nine candidates he made a point of knocking on doors all over the city.

“Which is exactly what I remembered learning with the Obama campaign,” Kirschling says. “It was uncomfortable at times to go into parts of the district that don’t necessarily agree with my opinion. But it allowed me the opportunity to stand on doorsteps or sometimes come into their house and have those conversations.”

Aletheia Henry went on to run Obama’s successful reelection campaign in Pennsylvania. In 2016, she was an adviser to Hillary Clinton’s campaign there, which was not so successful.

“I think these next few years are going to take a lot of conversation,” Henry says, recalling the motto of Obama’s 2008 campaign: “Respect, Empower, Include.”

For the entire article and audio interview: http://www.npr.org/2017/01/05/507927467/obamas-legacy-his-army-of-campaign-volunteers-continues-to-serve

YesWeCanPOTUSflag- thumbnail

By ☮ CR of  OFA

#AlwaysWillBeMyPresident

#ThePeoplesPresident

#IStandWithPresObama

#FiredUpReadyToGo

#PresidentObama

#ThankYouObama

#ThankObama

#ProudOfObama

#ILoveObama

#YesWeCan

#Obama

#OFA

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Congressional Black Congress – 46th Anniversary

1977, 15 of the Congressional Black Caucus members L -R (front row) B Jordan of TX, R Nix, Sr., of PA, R Metcalfe of IL, C Collins of IL P Mitchell of MD, G Hawkins of CA, S Chisholm of NY; (middle row) J Conyers, Jr., of MI, C Rangel of NY, H Ford, Sr., of TN, Y Brathwaite Burke of CA, W Fauntroy of the DC; (back row) R Dellums of CA, L Stokes of OH, and C C. Diggs, Jr., of MI
1977, 15 of the Congressional Black Caucus members
L -R (front row) B Jordan of TX, R Nix, Sr., of PA, R Metcalfe of IL, C Collins of IL P Mitchell of MD, G Hawkins of CA, S Chisholm of NY; (middle row) J Conyers, Jr., of MI, C Rangel of NY, H Ford, Sr., of TN, Y Brathwaite Burke of CA, W Fauntroy of the DC; (back row) R Dellums of CA, L Stokes of OH, and C C. Diggs, Jr., of MI

.As the number of African Americans serving in Congress grew, a long-desired movement to form a more unified organization among black legislators coalesced. When Charles C. Diggs, Jr., of Michigan entered the House of Representatives in 1955, he joined black Members William Dawson of Illinois and Adam Clayton Powell—the largest delegation of African Americans on Capitol Hill since Reconstruction. “In Congress, there was little, if any communication between Dawson and Powell,” Diggs noted. “Their styles were different. In terms of exercise between them, there was not any.” Diggs keenly felt the isolation endured by black Members due to their small numbers in Congress and, in some cases, an inability to connect on a personal level. Frustrated that black Representatives lacked a forum to discuss common concerns and issues, Diggs proposed the organization of the Democratic Select Committee (DSC) at the opening of the 91st Congress (1969–1971), maintaining that the DSC would fill a significant void by fostering the exchange of information among the nine African Americans serving in Congress, as well as between black Representatives and House leadership. “The sooner we get organized for group action, the more effective we can become,” Diggs remarked.  The informal group held sporadic meetings that were mainly social gatherings and had no independent staff or budget.

Newly elected Members and beneficiaries of court-ordered redistricting, William (Bill) Clay, Sr., of Missouri, Louis Stokes of Ohio, and Shirley Chisholm embraced the concept of a group for black legislators to “seize the moment, to fight for justice, to raise issues too long ignored and too little debated”—all of which quickly translated into a more influential association for African-American Members.

For more:  http://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/BAIC/Historical-Essays/Permanent-Interest/Congressional-Black-Caucus/

.

Congressional Black Congress

Since its establishment in 1971, Members of the Congressional Black Caucus have joined together to empower America’s neglected citizens and to address their legislative concerns.For more than 40 years, the CBC has consistently been the voice for people of color and vulnerable communities in Congress and has been committed to utilizing the full Constitutional power, statutory authority, and financial resources of the Government of the United States of America to ensure that everyone in the United States has an opportunity to achieve their version of the American Dream.

The legislative agenda of universal empowerment that Members of the Congressional Black Caucus collectively pursue include but are not limited to: the creation of universal access to a world-class education from birth through post secondary level; the creation of universal access to quality, affordable health care and the elimination of racially based health disparities; the creation of universal access to modern technology, capital and full, fairly-compensated employment; the creation and or expansion of U.S. foreign policy initiatives that will contribute to the survival, health, education and general welfare of all peoples of the world in a manner consistent with universal human dignity, tolerance and respect and such other legislative action as a majority of the entire CBC Membership may support.

For more: http://cbc.fudge.house.gov

.

Congressional Black Congress Twitter
Congressional Black Congress Facebook
Congressional Black Congress YouTube

.

#CongressionalBlackCaucus

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Harry T. Moore, Pres. of FL NAACP Killing – 65th Anniversary

Harry Tyson Moore (November 18, 1905 – December 25, 1951) was an African-American educator, a pioneer leader of the Civil Rights Movement, and founder of the first branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in Brevard County, Florida.

Harry T. Moore and his wife, Harriette Vyda Simms Moore, also an educator, were the victims of a bombing of their home in Mims, Florida on Christmas night 1951. He died in an ambulance on the way to a hospital in Seminole County while she died January 3, 1952 at the hospital in Sanford, Florida. Forensic work in 2005-6 resulted in the naming of the probable perpetrators as four Ku Klux Klan members, all long dead by the time of the investigation. The Moores were the first NAACP members to be murdered for civil rights activism; Moore has been called the first martyr of the early stage of the Civil Rights Movement.

For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_T._Moore#Murder

Civil Rights Martyrs

.

#NAACPBombing

#CivilRights

Obama_Biden_thumbnail

Resistance Against the Trump Agenda

Mourn. Then Organize.

At a time like this, many liberals and progressive will recall the words of labor activist Joe Hill: “Don’t mourn, organize.”

But let’s be honest. We’re in shock. We need time to mourn. To recover from the trauma of this election.

I feel awful for my 19-year-old twin daughters, who voted for the first time this year and now have to spend their college years with Trump as president. They’re upset. They talked about moving to Canada. They were half serious. We talked and texted all night, trying to console ourselves. It was tough.

I reminded them that we’ve been through periods like this before. The Civil War. The Gilded Age. The Great Depression.

I told them that in 1968, when I was 20, America elected Richard Nixon. At the time, we thought that this was the apocalypse. I had worked for Bobby Kennedy’s campaign. His murder in June of that year was traumatic. He certainly would have beaten Nixon, brought together the civil rights, union, and anti-war movements, and pushed to end the war in Vietnam, escalate and war on poverty, and expand workers rights.

After Nixon won, I considered moving to Canada myself, not just out of fear of Nixon’s agenda but also to avoid the draft and Vietnam. I even submitted an application to the University of Toronto.

But I stayed. I didn’t want to abandon my country. Like many others of my generation, I wanted to change it.

After Nixon beat Hubert Humphrey in November 1968, a massive resistance movement emerged to make it harder for Nixon to govern. In 1970, we started electing anti-war candidates to Congress. We started a backyard revolution of community organizing in urban communities. Then activists also built the women’s movement, the consumer movement, and the environmental movement.

Nixon did great damage (including the invasion of Cambodia, the killings at Jackson State and Kent State, the government infiltration and surveillance of dissenters), but the country survived.

Yes, Trump is worse than Nixon. He’s a demagogue, a white supremacist, a psychopath. But we’ll resist again.

I reminded my daughters that probably 35 percent of eligible voters didn’t vote this year. Most of them are poor, people of color, and/or young. Had they voted, Clinton would have won a big victory. Don’t judge the whole country by the election returns. The American people, overall, are better than the people who voted.

There will be many post mortems trying to explain how and why Trump won. Among the key factors:

James Comey: No major election analyst tonight (not even Rachel Maddow) mentioned the impact of FBI director Comey’s outrageous intervention on the outcome of this election. That, more than anything else, stopped Clinton’s momentum, diverted attention away from Trump’s sex and other scandals, and refocused public attention on Clinton’s emails. More than 20 million people voted between his letter to Congress 11 days ago, and his statement two days ago that the FBI found nothing damning in the new wave of Clinton emails. Much damage was done. Comey, the rogue FBI director, was more responsible for Trump’s victory than anyone else. A Republican under pressure from GOP lawmakers, Comey intentionally caused the damage.

Voter Suppression: The Republicans’ voter suppression campaign (including voter ID and felon disenfranchisement laws) in key battleground states—particularly in poor and minority areas—gave Trump the margin of victory. This was true in Milwaukee, Philadelphia, Charlotte, and other cities. Republicans engaged in such fraudulent election activities as sending phony robocalls to black households with misinformation about voting locations and times. Our arcane election laws also played a role. If Election Day were a national holiday (as it is in most democracies), or if most states had same-day voter registration, turnout among those groups would have been higher, and Clinton would have won in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and other swing states, and won the presidency.

Media Bias: The mainstream media gave Trump a free ride for most of the past year; treating him like a normal candidate rather than a racist demagogue. That allowed him to win the GOP nomination and to gain traction after the Republican convention. The media’s obsession with Clinton’s emails obscured the much-more-serious Trump scandals—his failure to pay taxes, his sexism, his bogus and self-serving foundation, his lies about his fortune, his fraudulent and abusive business practices, his total ignorance about public policy, Only in the past month did the media wake up and begin serious reporting on the real Trump. But it was too little, too late.

Right-Wing Money: The Koch brothers didn’t back Trump, but their political empire—including other right-wing billionaires who joined forces with them—may have spent close to a billion dollars helping Republican candidates for House and Senate. That increased GOP turnout in battleground states, and helped Trump.

Other factors—WikiLeaks, Attorney General Loretta Lynch’s stupid meeting with Bill Clinton on the airport tarmac, and the persistence of racism and sexism among a significant segment of the American population—all also played a role.

How did so many pollsters get it wrong?

How did so many pollsters get it wrong? Trump benefited from what political scientists call the “Bradley effect.” Just before Election Day in November 1982, polls showed that Tom Bradley, the African American mayor of Los Angeles, was going to beat Republican George Deukmejian in the race for California governor. But on Election Day, Deukmejian won. It appeared that many voters had lied to pollsters (or even to themselves). They didn’t want to appear racist, so they told pollsters they favored Bradley, but they voted for Deukmejian. Apparently, a significant number of people this year told pollsters they were voting for Clinton, or were undecided, but wound up voting for Trump. Perhaps they didn’t want to admit to pollsters, or to themselves, that they preferred Trump over Clinton.

The future looks better. Although turnout was low among the under-30 generation, those who went to the polls voted overwhelmingly for Hillary Clinton and liberal Democrats for Congress. Latinos—the fastest-growing part of the electorate—voted overwhelmingly for Clinton. Within a few years, their growing numbers will determine elections in Florida, Arizona, Nevada, even Texas.

There were even some silver linings on Tuesday. Voters in Maricopa County, Arizona, defeated the right-wing immigrant-bashing Sheriff Joe Arpaio. Voters in Arizona, Colorado, Maine and Washington state approved ballot initiatives on Tuesday to increase their states’ minimum wages. Voters in Arizona and Colorado approved measures to require businesses to provide employees with paid sick days. California voters approved statewide ballot measures to extend current income tax rates for the wealthy to pay for public education, to raise tobacco tax by $2 a pack, to repeal the ban on bilingual education, to strengthen gun control laws, and to legalize marijuana. And some might find solace knowing that even though Trump beat Clinton in the Electoral College, she won the popular vote.

Moreover, all polls show that large majorities of Americans support a progressive policy agenda that links economic prosperity with fairness. They want higher taxes on the super-rich, stronger regulations on Wall Street, and big business to protect consumers, workers, and the environment, a significant increase in the federal minimum wage, some version of universal health insurance, a large-scale job-creating infrastructure program, and more affordable colleges and universities.

But public opinion, on its own, doesn’t bring about change. That’s what movements do. Americans need to join forces to resist where Trump, Mitch McConnell, Paul Ryan, the Koch brothers, and Wall Street want to take the country. We need to build on the momentum of the Black Lives Matter and Fight for $15 campaigns, and the movements to protect immigrants, block the Keystone and Standing Rock pipelines, divest from fossil fuels, and defend Planned Parenthood and women’s right to choose.

We need new Democratic Party leadership. We need a progressive like Senators Elizabeth Warren or Dick Durbin, or Congressman John Lewis as the next head of the Democratic National Committee.

For more: http://prospect.org/article/mourn-then-organize

Timeline of protests against Donald Trump (post presidency)

For the entire timeline: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_protests_against_Donald_Trump#Post-election_protests 

Sunday, Jan 15, the 88th birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
Interfaith Moral Action on Climate is organizing a spiritual assembly and walk to the White House.

 

Wednesday, Jan. 18
Build and Resist: Climate Convergence and Action at the Inauguration and Earth2Trump Roadshow of Resistance. The Climate Justice Alliance also plans trainings and mobilization.

 

Thursday, Jan. 19
Take action in the morning at FERC to Resist Trump’s FERC

 

Friday, Jan. 20, Inauguration Day

 

Saturday, Jan. 21
* The Women’s March on Washington will begin at Independence Ave and 3rd St. SW.

 

Wednesday, Jan. 25

Seven Greenpeace members climbed a construction crane belonging to Clark Construction and displayed a large banner saying “Resist”, blocking traffic and interrupting work

 

Saturday, Jan. 28

Protests occurred at airports across the US, including O’Hare International Airport in Chicago, JFK Airport in New York, SFO in San Francisco, LAX in Los Angeles and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

Sunday, Jan. 29

Protests against executive order 13769, banning travelers and refugees from certain countries continue at airports and public spaces, continue in the United States  and internationally.

 

Monday, Jan 30

A protest occurred at the U.S. Consulate in TorontoCanada in the wake of Trump’s executive order on immigration. A demonstration by Democrats was held outside of the Supreme Court to protest the executive order. Across major cities in the United Kingdom, large crowds varying from over 200 people, protested against the Trump Administration’s order on banning travellers and refugees from certain countries, as well supporting the petition to ban the Trump state visit to the U.K, which gathered over one million signatures in two days.

 

Tuesday, January 31 

Protests against Executive Order 13769 continue. In Las Cruces, New Mexico, demonstrators showed up outside the Islamic Center to show support for the Muslim community.

 

Thursday, February 2

Yemeni business owners in New York City shut down their various businesses from noon until 8pm to protest executive order 13769.Thousands of Comcast employees in PortlandWashington, D.C., Philadelphia and Sunnyvale walked off the job in protest of executive order 13769.

 

Friday, February 3 

Mock vigils for the Bowling Green Massacre, a fictitious event accidentally created by Kellyanne Conway while defending executive order 13769 took place in Bowling Green, Kentucky and at Bowling Green train station in New York City.

Planned protests

Thursday, February 16 – A Day Without Immigrants strike

Monday, February 20 – ‘Not My Presidents Day’ protest

Wednesday, March 8Day Without a Woman

Saturday, April 15 – Tax Day March demanding that Donald Trump release his tax returns.

Saturdy, April 22 – Earth Day’s March for science protesting climate change denial.

Wednesday, May 1 – May Day aka International Worker’s Day 

Laws_thanks_to_Democrats

Proud to be a Democrat

Political positions of the Democratic Party

Economic policy:

Social policy:

For more: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democratic_Party_(United_States)#Political_positions

.

hope

Stop Trump Movement

Protests against Donald Trump

Planned demonstrations and boycotts of Inauguration of Donald Trump

.

#IlegitimatePresident

#NeverMyPresident

#NotMyPresident

#WomensMarchOnWashington

#WomensMarch

#DayWithoutImmigrants

#MarchForScience

#TaxMarch

#MayDay

#LoveConquersHate

#ProudLiberal

#Indivisible

#staystrong

 ☮ 

Forward For Equality_sml